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Fine Gardening – Issue 191

    Articles

  • Create Garden Rooms That Draw You In

    When designing a garden, I like to include at least one outdoor room that will tempt my clients to spend more time outside. A strong connection between indoor and outdoor…

  • A Cozy Covered Porch Garden Room

    Our U-shaped covered porch is the place to be in winter and early spring. The house itself blocks the north wind, and the space’s southern exposure makes it perfect for…

  • How to Design a Secluded Seating Area

    To the north, accessed through our dining room door, is the most formal of our garden rooms. A paved patio creates a nice space for entertaining as it gently contains…

  • How to Create a Relaxed Kitchen Garden Retreat

    Our kitchen garden has evolved over the years into a homegrown three-room space with a vegetable garden, two dining areas, and a firepit. Set apart from the house, it feels…

  • Everything You Need to Know About Euphorbia

    I’ve grown a fair share of hardy and tender plants from the genus Euphorbia, but truth be told, I’ve only scratched the surface. Comprising one of the largest plant families…

  • Great Euphorbias

    I’ll never forget my first visit to England thirty years ago. It was April, and the first garden I set foot in was the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew. The…

  • Euphorbia Care and Quirks

    Euphorbias, commonly known as spurges, are very easy to grow. They all need at least six hours of full sun, but more is generally better. Plants that don’t get enough…

  • How to Propagate Euphorbia

    Most of the evergreen types of euphorbias will self-sow when the correct conditions present themselves. New seedlings can be removed  from the plant when young. The non-evergreen types can be…

  • The Dos and Don’ts of Pruning Euphorbia

    Euphorbia growth is either caulescent (having stems above ground all year) or acaulescent (having only seasonal stems above ground). A third group of spurges, less common, stays woody year-round. These…

  • Growing Tips for Variegated Conifers

    Although generally low-maintenance, variegated conifers have a few extra needs. Here’s what you should do to keep them looking their best. See 9 cool variegated conifers here. Reject reverted branches…

  • A Blueberry by Any Other Name

    Of the roughly 100 species of Agapetes (Himalayan lanterns), most are epiphytes that grow in trees across the Himalayas to China and down the Malay Peninsula. The reason these unique…

  • A California Treasure, Now for Cooler Zones

    If you’ve ever visited the West Coast and fallen in love with the magical blue flowers of Agapanthus, you are not alone. And if you’ve ever been crestfallen at learning…

  • Seedling Aftercare

    Once your seeds have germinated, how do you give your young plants the best possible start? Read the Science of Seed Starting. Keep a careful watch. We can help seeds…

  • How to Tell If a Shrub is a Show-Stopper

    To some gardeners, in order for a plant to reach showstopper status it has to do everything—continuously—for 12 months of the year. Think spring blooms of a Himalayan magnolia (Magnolia…

  • The Science of Seed Starting

    Seeds are little miracles that transform the world. In the wild, these tiny amalgamations of DNA can be stored away for years, waiting for the right conditions to turn a…

  • How to Design a Functional Kitchen Patio Garden

    On the east side of our house, adjacent to the kitchen, a screened porch connects to an open patio with a built-in grill. Having a screened area for bug-free dining…

  • Little Moments Create Interest to the Shade Garden

    If adding interest is proving difficult, focus on smaller vignettes and combinations to add charm to your shady situation. See the full garden. Add something ornamental I use garden features…

  • Show-Stopping Shrubs

    Show-stopping shrubs—you know the kind. You’re leading a group of friends around the garden, and they’re politely following you with gin and tonic in hand, oooing and aaahing in slightly…

  • Secrets to Growing Citrus

    Growing citrus is achievable. Granted, these plants don’t fall into the indestructible category, but they are among the few fruiting plants that are within the realm of reality. You can…

  • Root Washing: Why and How to Wash Roots

    By now you’ve undoubtedly heard fellow gardeners talking about “root washing” their trees, shrubs, or even perennials before planting. The thought of removing all the protective coverings from the root…

  • Seed Starters Make the Best Friends | Letter from the Editor

    Myths and fairy tales are often grounded in reality, so when I hear the story of Jack swapping the family cow for a couple of magic beans, it rings true.…

  • Beauty in the Shade

    When we moved to our little red house on one and a half acres in 1977, I was 26 years old, just married, and beginning to rediscover myself after my…

  • 9 Cool Variegated Conifers

    Any variegated plant creates an extra splash of color and drama, and variegated conifers are no exception. Although once thought of as appearing sickly or diseased, variegated conifers are steadily…

  • Squeeze in Some Citrus

    Homegrown citrus is every indoor gardener’s Mount Everest. Who doesn’t dream of walking by the kitchen window, leaning over, and plucking a ripe lemon from their very own tree? Actually,…

    Edible Gardening

  • Great Citrus for Growing Indoors

    Not all citrus are easily adaptable for houseplant purposes. Kumquats (if you can find them) lend themselves to windowsill cultivation whereas grapefruits are notoriously difficult to grow in the average…

    Regional Reports

  • Regional Picks: Showy Shrubs – California

    1. Yellow Bells Tecoma stans Zones: 7–11 Size: 6 to 20 feet tall and 5 to 15 feet wide (grows smaller in inland areas) Conditions: Full sun; well-drained soil Native…

  • Regional Picks: Showy Shrubs – Mid-Atlantic

    1. Brandywine™ Possumhaw Viburnum Name: Viburnum nudum ‘Bulk’ Zones: 5–9 Size: 8 feet tall and 4 feet wide Conditions: Full sun to partial shade; average to moist soil Native range:…

  • Regional Picks: Showy Shrubs – Midwest

    1. ‘Pusch’ Norway Spruce Name: Picea abies ‘Pusch’ Zones: 3–7 Size: 2 feet tall and 3 feet wide Conditions: Full sun, tolerates partial shade; average to moist, well-drained soil Native…

  • Regional Picks: Showy Shrubs – Northeast

    1. Highbush Blueberry Name: Vaccinium corymbosum and cvs. Zones: 5–8 Size: 6 to 12 feet tall and 8 to 12 feet wide Conditions: Full sun to partial shade; moist, acidic…

  • Regional Picks: Showy Shrubs – Northwest

    1. Paloma Blanca Euonymus  Euonymus japonicus ‘Lankveld03’ Zones: 6–9 Size: 3 to 4 feet tall and 2 to 3 feet wide in 10 years Conditions: Partial shade; moist, fertile, well-drained…

  • Regional Picks: Showy Shrubs – Southeast

    1. ‘Hummingbird’ Summersweet Name: Clethra alnifolia ‘Hummingbird’ Zones: 3–9 Size: 3 feet tall and 4 feet wide Conditions: Full sun to partial shade; consistently moist soil Native range: Maine to…

  • Regional Picks: Showy Shrubs – Southern Plains

    1. Sapphire Surf™ Bluebeard Caryopteris x clandonensis ‘Blauer Splatz’ Zones: 5–9 Size: 1 to 2 feet tall and 2 to 3 feet wide Conditions: Full sun; average, well-drained soil Native…

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