• Adapting English Elegance: Plant IDs

    From issue #167, January/February 2016:It took about five years and two road trips through England before Anne Campodonico was ready to start her garden. True, the Kentfield, California mother of…

  • Designing a Tranquil Garden: Plant IDs

    Find out what some of the plants in this garden are!

  • Snowdrops

    Passions are born in strange ways, and serendipity often plays a part. In December 1983, my husband and I purchased our home, not knowing that a treasure trove of snowdrops…

  • Adapting English Elegance

    It took about five years and two road trips through England before Anne Campodonico was ready to start her garden. True, the Kentfield, California, mother of three wasn’t in a…

  • Grow Your Own Microgreens

    Since I have been growing microgreens commercially, I have seen their popularity take off. Countless fine restaurants have added them to their menus, and customers have started seeking them out…

  • Designing a Tranquil Garden

    My ideal garden is a serene place, one in which I feel connected to the natural world through rich, sensory experiences. It is a place that generates a sense of…

  • The Best Fruit For Containers

    Fruit trees and shrubs, unlike many other edibles, can take up a lot of space when grown in the ground. An average semidwarf apple tree, for example, takes up anywhere…

  • Stealing the Scene

    It is easy to dismiss the garden of Adrian Bloom as having no relevance for us normal American gardeners. First, the garden is in England, where, as everyone knows, the…

  • Falling in Love with Conifers | Letter from the Editor

    Everyone enjoys seeing snowdrops in early spring, but some people love them so much they are known as galanthophiles, and it makes me jealous. I want to love a group…

  • Magnolias

    Magnolias (Magnolia spp.and cvs., USDA Hardiness Zones 3–9) have been appreciated as garden subjects for centuries. The Chinese planted magnolias at their temples as early as the seventh century, and…

  • Regional Picks for Late-Winter Interest

    While most gardeners can find interest in things like bare branches and seed heads, we all get to a point where we want a dose of garden color in the…

  • Regional Picks: Late-Winter Interest - California

        1. ‘Mickie’ Rock Rose Name: Cistus × hybridus ‘Mickie’ USDA hardiness zones: 7 to 10 Size: 18 inches tall and 3 feet wide Conditions: Full sun; needs good…

  • Regional Picks: Late-Winter Interest – Mid-Atlantic

        1. Northern Bayberry Name: Myrica pensylvanica USDA Hardiness Zones: 3 to 6 Size: 9 feet tall and 5 to 12 feet wide Conditions: Full sun to partial shade;…

  • Regional Picks: Late-Winter Interest – Midwest

        1. ‘Berry Poppins’ Winterberry Name: Ilex verticillata ‘FarrowBPop’ USDA Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9 Size: 3 to 4 feet tall and wide Conditions: Full sun to partial shade;…

  • Regional Picks: Late-Winter Interest - Northwest

        1. ‘Onyx Odyssey’ Hellebore Name: Helleborus hybridus ‘Onyx Odyssey’ USDA Hardiness Zones: 4 to 8 Size: 12 to 15 inches tall and 18 to 24 inches wide Conditions: Best…

  • Regional Picks: Late-Winter Interest - Northeast

        1. Weeping Norway Spruce Name: Picea abies ‘Pendula’ USDA Hardiness Zones: 3 to 7 Size: Up to 5 feet tall; width is variable and controllable Conditions: Sun to partial…

  • Regional Picks: Late-Winter Interest - Southeast

        1. Japanese Forest Grass Name: Hakonechloa macraand cvs. USDA Hardiness Zones: 5 to 9 Size: 12 to 18 inches tall and wide Conditions: Partial shade; consistently moist, humus-rich…

  • Regional Picks: Late-Winter Interest – Southern Plains

        1. 'HGC Pink Frost' Hellebore Name: Helleborus ballardiae ‘HGC Pink Frost’ USDA Hardiness Zones: 5 to 9 Size: 12 to 15 inches tall; 24 inches wide Conditions: Full…

  • When Not to Prune

    An old boss of mine used to say that “the best time to prune is when the knife is sharp.” His logic was, basically, prune when you have the time.…

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