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Fine Gardening – Issue 148

  • A Tiny Courtyard Makeover

    This once-neglected patio gets a lively lift thanks to a few designer tricks

  • Clever storage for coiled hoses

    An inexpensive and easy way to keep these popular hoses neat and tidy

  • Filling the topiary void

    Use burlap to create a polished topiary display

  • A Barrier of Poisonous Plants Deters Voles

    Use voles' appetites to their disadvantage

  • How to Plant Tulips in Pots

    Growing these spring classics in pots lets you dodge most of their drawbacks

  • How to Divide Peonies

    You seldom hear someone complain about a big, fragrant peony blooming in spring. You often hear, however, gardeners bemoaning the retail price of a new peony plant. The good news…

  • A Border Worth Waiting For

    If the only thing “fall color” means to you is that it’s time to get out your rake, you are missing what can be the best season in the garden.…

  • Uncommon Grasses

    A couple of old-school gardeners I admire believe that ornamental grasses belong in meadows or along the shore, not in the garden. I reluctantly agree that grasses can dress the…

  • Troubleshooting Viburnums

    It’s easy to understand why gardeners love viburnums (Viburnum spp. and cvs., USDA Hardiness Zones 2–9). They have lustrous leaves and large (sometimes fragrant) blossoms, and many produce magnificent berries…

  • Dare to Divide Your Peonies

    Would you like to have a few more peonies in your garden but hesitate because of the cost? If you already have a large herbaceous peony, you can divide its…

  • Focus on Seasonality

    On a scale of one to 10—with 10 being the greatest concern—seasonality should rank about eight or nine when it comes to designing a garden. But developing a year-round powerhouse…

  • Regional Picks: Four Season Interest - Northeast

    1. Purple Wood Spurge Name: Euphorbia amygdaloides ‘Purpurea’ USDA Hardiness Zones: 6 to 9 Size: Up to 22 inches tall and wide Conditions: Full sun to partial shade; fertile, sandy,…

  • Regional Picks: Four Season Interest - Midwest

    1. Gold Moss Sedum Name: Sedum acre and cvs. USDA Hardiness Zones: 3 to 8 Size: Up to 3 inches tall, spreading indefinitely Conditions: Full sun to light shade; well-drained…

  • Regional Picks: Four Season Interest - Southern Plains

    1. Bountiful Blue® Blueberry Name: Vaccinium corymbosum ‘FLX–2’ USDA Hardiness Zones: 6 to 10 Size: 3 to 4 feet tall and wide Conditions: Full sun; acidic, moist, well-drained soil This…

  • Regional Picks: Four Season Interest - Northern Plains

    1. Pigsqueak Name: Bergenia spp. and cvs. USDA Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9 Size: Up to 18 inches tall and 2 feet wide Conditions: Full sun to partial shade; moist,…

  • Regional Picks: Four Season Interest - Southern California

    1. ‘Safari Sunset’ Leucadendron Name: Leucadendron ‘Safari Sunset’ USDA Hardiness Zones: 9 to 11 Size: 8 feet tall and 6 feet wide Conditions: Full sun; poor, well-drained soilFor a colorful…

  • Regional Picks: Four Season Interest - Northwest

    1. Strawberry Tree Name: Arbutus unedo USDA Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11 Size: 15 to 20 feet tall and 10 to 15 feet wide Conditions: Full sun to partial shade;…

  • Create a Laid-Back Allée

    Using oakleaf hydrangeas is the key to building an inexpensive, year-round focal point

  • Elephant's Ears

    Elephant's Ears

    For a look you can’t ignore, broaden your foliage palette with these big bold leaves

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