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Garden Photo of the Day

More from Jeanne’s garden in Washington

Just a quiet place to sit

Photo/Illustration: All photos courtesy of Jeanne Cronce
The tri-colored beech, which is so bright in the spring and of course every garden needs a little whimsy
The golden chain tree
The aggressive wisteria vine, but they are so beautiful and it’s a must-have for me
A poor example of color mixing. I have since moved the red azalea
The bloom of our gunnera, which is such a great plant if you have the room. I made a few cement leaves from this plant that are quite dramatic.
Some tulips that the rabbits missed. Looking at this makes me long for spring.
In front of our house on a peaceful morning
Great colors–using maples here really puts on a show
A young pic of our front yard
Just a quiet place to sit

Photo/Illustration: All photos courtesy of Jeanne Cronce
The tri-colored beech, which is so bright in the spring and of course every garden needs a little whimsy
The golden chain tree
The aggressive wisteria vine, but they are so beautiful and it’s a must-have for me
A poor example of color mixing. I have since moved the red azalea
The bloom of our gunnera, which is such a great plant if you have the room. I made a few cement leaves from this plant that are quite dramatic.
Some tulips that the rabbits missed. Looking at this makes me long for spring.
In front of our house on a peaceful morning
Great colors–using maples here really puts on a show
A young pic of our front yard

We visited Jeanne Cronce’s Port Orchard, Washington, garden twice last month (HERE & HERE), and today she’s back with some shots from more seasons! She saves all her commentary for the captions–check them out. And woohoo! Jeanne plans on being at the Northwest Flower & Garden Show on one of the days I’ll be there (Feb. 6-9)! I hope I get to meet you, Jeanne. Come search me out either at my talk or at the Fine Gardening booth! Anybody else going to be there? Let me know!

——Winter is the perfect time to take a photographic stroll through the photos you took in your garden this year……and then send some in to me at GPOD@taunton.com!

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Comments

  1. Jeff Goodearth 01/10/2014

    as always just GREAT. all the plants i love and many that i want but can't have here. envy your wisteria but i'm just too slow (or lazy) to keep up with it. the gunnera is impressive but i fear mine probably died this past monday night even with lots of protection

  2. flowerladydi 01/10/2014

    Lovely Jeanne,, Just lovely! Love the Tri-color,,,,especially in spring,,, WISH that I could do the wisteria,,,, just do not have enough room or strong support, but always wish I had when I see those as great as yours.,,,,Also love the gunnera!,, again, another plant that I need more room for,, but so nice to see it in other's yards! Love all the different things going on everywhere!,,, and your stone path is soooo very charming!

  3. User avater
    Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 01/10/2014

    Such rich and varied textures and colors! It really is a winner based on foliage alone; the flowers are icing on the cake. If It were my garden, I'd have moved the red azalea, too, but my first reaction to the photo was, "how cool is that?"

  4. gloriaj 01/10/2014

    Okay what plant don't you have. LOL. Everything is just beautiful. I love how each plant compliment each other. The chain tree is new to me, but would love to have one because yellow is my favorite color. I'll have to look that up. My favorite is a quiet place to sit.

  5. User avater
    meander1 (Michaele ) 01/10/2014

    Jeanne, you certainly have a delightful selection of ornamental trees. The picture featuring the golden chain tree is pure magic...the wondrous glowing panicles from the tree reaching down to almost meet the perfect compliment of purple in the allium. And, be still my beating heart, is that also a purple clematis twining its way up into the tree?! Love it, love it, love it! I also adore your tri-color beech. Jeff, is that a tree that does well here in TN or are our hot, humid summers too much for it?

  6. Jeff Goodearth 01/10/2014

    meander1, the tri color beech does well here for me but man is it slow! i have had some scorch in hot/dry summers so afternoon shade might not be a bad thing and watch out for those borers. i'm envious of all of Jeanne's garden

  7. wGardens 01/10/2014

    Wonderful! That is a great chain tree... always wanted to try one but have no room. (Wisteria, too!) Love yur variety of plant materials and you have some great combinations!And your flock of flamingos is fun! Okay... so now I need to see your cement gunnera leaves!

  8. lovemyyard 01/10/2014

    in 5 words:texture, color, stunning, stunning, stunning

  9. lovemyyard 01/10/2014

    in 5 words:texture, color, stunning, stunning, stunning

  10. Jeff Goodearth 01/10/2014

    jeanne, what is the green clump under the wisteria, i can't quite make it out and "in front of our house on a peaceful morning" what is the silver/almost white plant in front of what i think is a Phormium

  11. GardenersWK 01/10/2014

    What a beautiful collection of shrubs, trees, grasses! I love how the various textures play on each other!
    Thanks for sharing! Can we see your vegetables and fruit gardens too?

  12. HelloFromMD 01/10/2014

    Hi Jeanne,

    You have a beautiful palette of plants! Loving that Golden Chain tree with the purple accents from allium and clematis.

  13. tractor1 01/10/2014

    I love all the colors and textures. And that's a gorgeous path by the wisteria... btw, wisteria does not need a lot of room or even something to climb on, simply keep it well pruned, in fact it produces more flowers when kept small, prune severely after its leaves fall, remove like 80%, prune similarly to grape vines. I had a wisteria at my last house, at the rear garage door next to the AC unit, I kept it as a shrub 6' high and wide, did very well for 20 years... can't find a photo of it in flower but there it is in early spring. Thank you, Jeanne, great garden and I love that last photo of your front yard.

  14. quinquek 01/10/2014

    Wonderful plants, wonderful combinations, wonderful compositions! Love the wisteria (but not for me). The quiet place to sit, I admit, I envy! Thank you for sharing!

  15. GrannyMay 01/10/2014

    Jeanne yours is one of my favourite gardens! I could happily sit in that quiet place for hours and study the beauty all around. You have so many of my favourites and many that I never thought of trying, but will read up on now, like the tri-colour beech. Reading Jeff's comment that it is slow, I'm thinking it might be a candidate for container growing. Maybe the colours would complement the red banana I want to try after seeing yours. What do you think? Thanks again, Jeanne!

  16. JaneEliz 01/10/2014

    What a gorgeous garden , Jeanne! Love your plant combinations...colors and shapes, unusual and dramatic plant selections including some of the most beautiful trees and vines...It's spectacular! Would love to see it in person.

  17. greengenes 01/10/2014

    Hey tractor1, thanks so much for the info on wisteria. I have wondered if there was a tree variety but it seems all you do is prune to a bush or small tree. Iam definitely going to try one. There are a couple other colors that are so nice.
    tntreeman. I sure hope your gunnera makes it! The green plant under the wisteria is a maiden hair fern that seemed to just show up on its own. Its about 3 years old. And the white shrub in the other pic is called a dappled willow. Thanks everyone for the nice comments. We all will be back to pulling weeds and digging in the dirt, real soon!

  18. Annek 01/10/2014

    Outstanding. I can't decide which photo is the most impressive, but the golden chain tree is currently leading the pack. And I'm curious about how your gardens are placed around your house. (Even though this isn't a Fine Homes website, the curiosity is still there).

    I've revisited and restudied your photos....Now the 'front of the house on a peaceful morning' is edging up to first place..no wait, the maple shot...no wait..... :-) Thanks for the morning shot of beauty.

  19. irina_iaco 01/10/2014

    Hello,

    I am writing to you with a question regarding my 9-year old Calamondin tree which apparently is dying...

    I followed as much as I could all the instructions given to me regarding the watering, the fertilizer and the size of the pot the tree should grow in. For more than 6 months, it was OK. I stopped giving it the fertilizer in October, as instructed.

    It blossomed, grew, then fruit showed up and started to ripe.
    But at some point, with fruit still growing, it started to shed leaves - first the old ones and now even the new ones.

    They just fell of the branches, still green. I decided to harvest the fruit, hoping it will get better. Nothing new happened, the leaves continued to fall.

    I decided to put the tree in a bigger pot (15 inches wide), changed the soil with a citrus-only mixture and gave it only one round of fertilizer, approximately 10 days ago. Leaves still fell off.

    At the moment, it has only 10 to 15 leaves left and quite a few branches have a brownish color at the top.

    My question is: what can I do to make it feel better? It obviously is not doing well. The other Calamondin tree I have (4 year old) is doing quite well, growing etc.

    I hope you can tell me something that will help. I know you are the best!

    Thanks so much,
    Irina Iacovescu

  20. Jeff Goodearth 01/10/2014

    irina, have you checked it for spider mites?

  21. Meelianthus 01/10/2014

    Hi Jeanne ~ MORE beautiful pictures of your wonderful gardens. I can't wait to see them this summer. L

    Michelle, yes I will be there at NWGS to cheer you on ^_^
    Looking forward to meeting you and enjoying your talk. LS

  22. irina_iaco 01/10/2014

    @tntreeman: no, I didn't. Any advice on how can this be done?

    Thanks!

  23. irina_iaco 01/10/2014

    @tntreeman: I searched for it and looked once again at the leaves, more carefully this time. They are fine, green and with no sign o damage on them.
    I can't understand what's wrong...

  24. Jeff Goodearth 01/10/2014

    irina, hold a sheet of white paper underthe remaining leaves, tap them sharply then look at the white paper. if you see tiny pinpoint spots moving about, not pin head but pinpoint,,, those are the mites. they don't eat leaves, they are on the undersides of the leaves and very small. the leaves can have an "off color" and sometimes a grayish look. i have a Citrus/ Pink Lemonade doing the same thing , i blame it on low humidity inside my house

  25. irina_iaco 01/10/2014

    @tnttreeman: Ok, I'll do it in the morning. And if the test is positive, what's the next step?

  26. Jeff Goodearth 01/10/2014

    i would probably cut off the remaining leaves , spray off all branches with a forcefull blast of water, let dry , then mist with rubbing alcohol. i don't know if that's the recommended method but it's always worked for me.
    sorry Jeanne for "butting in" but we wanted to save this orange tree!
    where are you irina?

  27. cwheat000 01/11/2014

    Beautiful autumn colors, wonderful array of textures and I kind of like the red azalea where it is.

  28. greengenes 01/11/2014

    Hi Irina, Jeanne cronce here. I just read your response and iam so sorry to say that I really don't know what is going on with your calamondon tree. tntreeman has recommended to you about the mites. It could very well be this. I had a Colorado blue spruce that had them and I was able to find out by placing a white piece of paper under a branch and shaking it a little and what do you know... there were some bugs. They are so small you can hardly notice anything until it starts to die back. Thanks tntreeman for stepping in! Its always great to have people who want to help eachother! I hope this plant will get back on track, Irina...

  29. irina_iaco 01/11/2014

    @tntreeman: yes, unfortunately the test was positive. I didn't want to "shake" the tree too hard, since there are only 10 leaves left that will fall anyway... and soon. :)

    So it's just water and alcohol and that's it, nothing more?

    I have another 4 year old Calamondin tree right next to the sick one and it's doing great... For now. Should I move it, in order to prevent the spread of spider mites?

    Out of courtesy for Jeanne, I think it's best if we discuss the matter further via e-mail. Would you mind sending your answer to irina.iacovescu@gmail.com?

    Thanks so much for all your help!

    PS: I'm from Romania and so far I wasn't able to find a decent answer to my problem on the Romanian web sites... An American friend told me about this site and I didn't hesitate to write...

  30. irina_iaco 01/11/2014

    Hi, Jeanne and Happy New Year!

    Thanks for your reply and for the opportunity to tell the story about my tree. I really had no idea what's going on and tntreeman feeling was right.

    What did you do with your tree? You gave it the same "treatment" tntreeman mentioned? I will do as he says because I really think that's the last resort.

    Once again, thanks!

  31. Jeff Goodearth 01/11/2014

    Jeanne, thanks for not taking offense at my discussion with Irina concerning spider mites. I knew you wouldn't when we started because gardeners are 9 times out of 10 always friendly, warm and willing to help and share experiences with everybody. i'm back again this morning to enjoy your garden photos on a very very rainy morning but at least it's warm here!

  32. greengenes 01/12/2014

    Hi Irina.. Well I must say that I ended up using a bug spray because my tree I about 5ft tall. I think what tntreeman suggested is great. I would for sure try that. I have orchids and they ended up getting a scale bug problem and I used rubbing alcohol with a swab and went over the plant and it cleared it all up and it didn't hurt the orchids at all!
    tntreeman, you are so gracious..glad to hear that its raining there and not snow or ice. Weve been 80% behind our rain for the fall and winter but yesterday was the grand entrance for our rain. Its been nonstop and heavy. I never thought I would be praying for rain! Its always something to see how much I take rain for granted around here.. anyway it will keep us all green here! And how beautiful the mountains are with the snow on them! Happy gardening!

  33. Jeff Goodearth 01/12/2014

    jeanne, i suggested the water bath and alcohol because i sort of assumed the trees were/are small and i didn't know if she ate the fruit and i'm always uneasy about using chemicals on food stuff or in the house.
    still raining here! slow and steady

  34. AnneinQC 01/15/2014

    I just love your style Jeanne! it really inspires me, I will be coming back to look at your pics in the spring for sure!

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