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Midwest Regional Reports

Regional Picks: Variegated Plants for Shade—Midwest

Fine Gardening - Issue 194
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Photo: millettephotomedia.com

1. ‘Purpurea Tricolor’ European Beech

Name: Fagus sylvatica ‘Purpurea Tricolor’

Zones: 4–7

Size: 20 to 30 feet tall and 10 to 20 feet wide

Conditions: Partial shade; well-drained soil

Native range: Central Europe to the Caucasus

This tree has been around for a while, but it is still a favorite of mine. If it is sited just right, where light can trickle through the upper canopy to backlight the leaves, the pink glow it gives off is just stunning. Its foliage has a dark rosy flush in spring that will fade to a softer pink as the summer progresses and the variegation starts to bleach toward white. In the Midwest, it performs best in a partially shaded location; the leaves will burn in full afternoon sun. It also needs very well-drained soil and will not tolerate heavy clay or wet feet.

Photo: millettephotomedia.com

2. ‘Banana Boat’ Broad-Leaved Sedge

Name: Carex siderosticha ‘Banana Boat’

Zones: 5–9

Size: 6 to 12 inches tall and wide

Conditions: Partial to full shade; medium to wet soil

Native Range: Woodland mountain areas in Japan, China, and Korea

Here’s a sweet little ground cover that will brighten up any shady spot. This sedge has a slight chartreuse and green variegation, but it will appear to be mostly chartreuse in the landscape. It is very easy to grow and is not a quick spreader. To make it shine, pair it with your favorite blue hosta (Hosta cvs., Zones 3–9) or Japanese painted fern (Athyrium niponicum var. pictum and cvs., Zones 3–8).

Photo: courtesy of Plant Delights Nursery Inc.

3. Penny’s Pink® Hellebore

Name: Helleborus ‘ABCRD01’

Zones: 5–8

Size: 14 inches tall and 20 inches wide

Conditions: Partial shade; average to dry, fertile, well-drained soil

Native range: Hybrid of European species

This sweet new addition to our English cottage garden has evergreen foliage that emerges heavily mottled in spring, fading to a soft silver mottle in summer. The rosy pink flowers have a long bloom time and are held on dark stems that accent the flowers quite nicely. Pair it with ‘Citronelle’ heuchera (Heuchera ‘Citronelle’, Zones 4–8) or golden-leaved bleeding heart (Lamprocapnos spectabilis ‘Gold Heart’, Zones 3–9) for a pop of color.

Photo: courtesy of Plant Delights Nursery Inc.

4. ‘Silver Center’ Japanese Cobra Lily

Name: Arisaema sikokianum ‘Silver Center’

Zones: 4–9

Size: 18 to 24 inches tall and wide

Conditions: Partial to full shade; moist but well-drained, humus-rich soil

Native Range: Japan

There are too many great plants in the genus Arisaema to choose from, so I threw a dart and decided this would be my pick. ‘Silver Center’ adds a unique, tropical fl air to any shady garden. In spring, as with many members of its family, the tuber produces a single stem containing a silver variegated pair of five-lobed leaves. From the center of the leaf stalks, it sends up a musky-smelling flower (or spathe). The flower is dark purple on the outside, pure white on the inside, and has a colorful hood streaked with purple, dark green, and white. You will need more than one plant if you are hoping these will spread, but really, why would you buy just one?

—Jennifer Smock manages the Kemper Center for Home Gardening at the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis.

From Fine Gardening #194

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