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Asarum europaeum (European wild ginger)

Asarum europaeum Photo/Illustration: Michelle Gervais

(Based on 2 user reviews)

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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Botanical Name: Asarum europaeum ah-SAR-um yur-oh-PAY-um Common Name: European wild ginger Genus: Asarum
European wild ginger is a low-growing groundcover with glossy, evergreen, heart-shaped leaves. Its unusual purple-brown flowers lie mostly concealed beneath foliage.
Noteworthy characteristics: This plant makes a great groundcover.
Propagation: Sow seed in containers as soon as ripe. Some species self sow. Divide carefully in early spring.
Problems: Slugs and snails. Rust and leaf gall.
Height Less than 6 in.
Spread 6 in. to 12 in.
Growth Habit Spreads
Light Part Shade to Full Shade
Moisture Medium Moisture
Maintenance Low
Characteristics Showy Foliage
Bloom Time Late Spring; Spring
Foliage Color Evergreen
Flower Color Purple/ Lavender Flower
Uses Beds and Borders
Style Container, Herb Garden, Cottage Garden, Woodland Garden
Seasonal Interest Winter Interest, Spring Interest, Summer Interest, Fall Interest
Type Perennials

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