Garden Photo of the Day

READER PHOTOS! Jan’s garden in Ohio, revisited

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Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Jan Meissner

We featured Jan Meissner’s Avon, Ohio, garden last spring (here, here, & here). She’s back again this year with this selection of photos that are having her longing for spring (we know how she feels, right?).

Jan says of the first photo, “I thought you might like this blue/black/pink combo. Black mondo grass (Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’, USDA Hardiness Zones 6-11) is so slow to sprout new leaves here in zone 6a, but just about the time I’m ready to replace it, it redeems itself.”

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Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Jan Meissner

Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Jan Meissner
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Jan Meissner
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Jan Meissner
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Jan Meissner

Jan included a few more shots from around her garden, but had this to say about the gorgeous chartreuse chair: “While I was in my color combo mood last year, I painted a $12 chair in a bright green to match hostas ‘Spritzer’ and ‘Guacamole’, and the variegated Hakone grass (Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’, Zones 5-9). The side of my house is so shady–these hot pops of green really liven things up. Even the newly emerging cicada coordinates.”

Thanks, Jan, for bringing us back to your garden again!

Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Jan Meissner
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Jan Meissner

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Comments

  1. Steepdrive 02/28/2012

    Love those hostas. Mine haven't even broken the ground yet this spring but it won't be long. Thanks for the reminder of these to come.

  2. User avater
    meander_michaele 02/28/2012

    After seeing the previous photos as well as the ones featured today, I am forced to come to the conclusion that Jan is a Gardener Extraordinaire! Her beds are beautiful and impeccably maintained with interesting and harmonious plant combinations. I love her whimsical touches. The pop of color with the chartreuse chair is perfect.
    The succulent filled birdcage from an earlier posting is amazing.

  3. User avater
    Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 02/28/2012

    Stunning perfection. Wonderful sense of composition and plant selection. Is that awesome stone and copper(?) structure a gate? How does it work? Michelle, thanks for adding the links to the past posts! Incredible!

  4. tractor1 02/28/2012

    As is "Vojt" I too am intrigued by the oddly bent metal rod and stone steles that appears to be some sort of stile; perhaps an intergallactic transporter port for the ET gardeners among us... ah, I see one of you aliens in that last picture! Very appetizing chair, just don't sit in it lest you get swept away by little green beings/beans.
    Very interesting garden, thanks.

  5. greenthumblonde 02/28/2012

    @Vojt Yes that stone structure is a gate. A landscape designer I know and admire designed the structure for a Cleveland Home and Garden show feature garden. The metal portion is steel and was bent and fabricated in their shop. Shorter pieces of steel were inserted into drilled holes in the stone and "glued" into the stone with cement that is used in underwater applications. The gate swings on a simple pin type hinge and latches in a style similar to a keychain ring that opens. The steel was originally painted a beautiful hydrangea blue. It appears to pass through the stone and emerges out the other side. In it's original installation the metal continued throughout the garden undulating through trees, disappearing into the ground and emerging a few feet away. It was quite beautiful. After the home and garden show, I painted the steel with copper paint for a more subtle effect in my garden. The large stones are planted about 2 1/2 feet in the ground. The gate is one of my favorite finds. I'm glad you enjoyed it too.

  6. gottagarden 02/28/2012

    What I like about the gate is how it frames the lovely stone path. The moss between the stones is so soothing, and I know how hard it is to keep that weed free, so well done!

  7. pattyspencer 02/29/2012

    Lovely garden! I especially like the first picture and the painted chair. I was confused tho by the iron - I first thought it was portraying a jumping rope when it's doing the double dutch but after reading other responses I see that it's a gate.

  8. tractor1 02/29/2012

    pattyspencer: To be perfctly honest at very first glance I thought, gee, someone forgot to put their garden hose away. Then when I realized what it is I thought it would be better had it been the garden hose, I see nothing attactive about that mangled metal, and I can't see how it's a gate, anyone can walk right through. The stone steles are kind of attractive but I'd remove that twisted metal, I see no need for a gate there... in fact someone is liable to go through without paying attention and mangle their face, I can envision some child dashing through, tripping on the bottom portion, smashing their head on the flagstone and ending up a cripple, or worse. To me it's a trap, it presents a hazard... either install a proper gate or nothing at all... that's a big fat law suit waiting to happen.

  9. pattyspencer 03/01/2012

    To Tractor1 - I see your points. Artistic - maybe but it's just not my cup of tea either.

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