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Oxalis oregana (Redwood sorrel)

Oxalis oregana Photo/Illustration: Michelle Gervais


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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Botanical Name: Oxalis oregana Common Name: Redwood sorrel Genus: Oxalis
Redwood sorrel is a creeping native perennial with shamrock-shaped leaves and cup-shaped pink, lilac, or white flowers over a long period from spring to fall. It makes a nice groundcover.
Noteworthy characteristics: Native to the Northwestern U.S. and California. Long-blooming. Attractive shamrock-shaped leaves. Good substitute for English ivy (Hedera helix).
Care: Grow in moist, fertile, humus-rich soil in full or part shade.
Propagation: Sow seed at 55° to 64°F in late winter or early spring. Divide in spring. Small sections root easily if provided with bottom heat.
Problems: Rust, seed smut, powdery mildew, and fungal leaf spots are common, while leaf miners and spider mites are less common.
Height 6 in. to 12 in.
Growth Habit Runs
Growth Pace Moderate Grower
Light Part Shade to Full Shade
Moisture Medium Moisture
Maintenance Moderate
Characteristics Native; Showy Foliage
Bloom Time Fall; Spring; Summer
Flower Color Pink Flower; Purple/ Lavender Flower; White Flower
Uses Ground Covers, Naturalizing
Style Woodland Garden
Seasonal Interest Spring Interest, Summer Interest, Fall Interest
Type Perennials

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