Garden Photo of the Day

READER PHOTOS! Julie’s garden in Pennsylvania

2 WAYS TO ENLARGE!Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window. A wide view of our shade path and circle lawn where you can see Sedum 'Frosty Morn' on the corner of the circle. Click on each photo on the left individually to access enlarging tools and captions.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Julie Witmer

Today’s photos are from Julie Witmer from her Zone 5 Pennsylvania garden. She says, “I am quite surprised and pleased with myself at how good everything is still looking in October. Our first freeze will be here in a couple of weeks so I am trying to soak it up!” So pretty, Julie! Thanks for sharing! 

2 WAYS TO ENLARGE!Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Our hill garden (Rosa ‘The Fairy’, Stachys byzantina, Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, Canna ‘King Humbert’, Echinacea purpurea and Perovskia ‘Little Spire’).
Click on each photo on the left individually to access enlarging tools and captions.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Julie Witmer
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE!Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Our hill garden (Rosa ‘The Fairy’, Stachys byzantina, Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, Canna ‘King Humbert’, Echinacea purpurea and Perovskia ‘Little Spire’).
Click on each photo on the left individually to access enlarging tools and captions.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Julie Witmer
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE!Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
This is the walk from our driveway to our back door (Aster ‘Peter III’ to the left).
Click on each photo on the left individually to access enlarging tools and captions.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Julie Witmer
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE!Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Dahlia ‘Heat Wave’ with Canna ‘King Humbert’ and pink Japanese anemones.
Click on each photo on the left individually to access enlarging tools and captions.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Julie Witmer
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE!Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Sedum ‘Frosty Morn’ with Japanese forest grass (Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’).
Click on each photo on the left individually to access enlarging tools and captions.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Julie Witmer
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE!Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
The new English ivy topiary balls I am training which are sitting by our garage door.
Click on each photo on the left individually to access enlarging tools and captions.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Julie Witmer
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE!Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Sedum ‘Frosty Morn’ under northern sea oats (Chasmanthium latifolium) near our Circle Lawn.
Click on each photo on the left individually to access enlarging tools and captions.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Julie Witmer

As I said yesterday, keep those photos coming, folks! While I can’t post everything that comes in (please don’t be offended if I don’t feature your photos–they’re all beautiful!), I’ll do my best to feature as many of your gardens as I can.

Thanks! —Michelle

 

Welcome to the Fine Gardening GARDEN PHOTO OF THE DAY blog! Every weekday we post a new photo of a great garden, a spectacular plant, a stunning plant combination, or any number of other subjects. Think of it as your morning jolt of green.

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READER PHOTOS: We love featuring your photos, too. If you think you have a photo that we should share on the Garden Photo of the day, email us. Send hi-res images if possible. We’ll only respond if we plan to use your photo.

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Comments

  1. JulieBW 10/18/2011

    Sooo lovely! I tire quickly of hearing peoples comments who think that gardens are gone after July...

  2. grayjohnson 10/18/2011

    This is what I've been looking for... other people's gardens. REAL gardens, from REAL people who love their dirt! Love the placement of their plants and share the beauty. Thank you!

  3. User avater
    meander_michaele 10/18/2011

    I wouldn't have thought that a tropical like Canna could give off such a great autumn vibe but the colors in your 'King Humbert' are perfect for fall.

  4. smesq 10/18/2011

    This is a beautiful garden! I agree, I love seeing gardens from REAL people! She has done a wonderful job.

  5. tractor1 10/18/2011

    It's very unfair/shallow to denigrate those who do a labor of love in the public gardens... they are REAL people too... most of whom are volunteers, individuals and groups from local gardening clubs. For more years than I care to remember, since grade school, I volunteered at The Brooklyn Botanic Gardens, and now I give of my time, efforts, and personal funds helping to beautify our small rural village, and I also volunteer my gardening skills along with many other volunteers at the local golf course... what is this REAL people business, ALL gardeners are REAL people and all gardens are REAL gardens. Differentiate by calling them public/private gardens, but stop it with this infantile REAL business. Thank you for your understanding.

  6. elizk 10/18/2011

    It's really gorgeous. Love the sedum and the pumpkins along the pathway.

  7. User avater
    forloveofflowers 10/18/2011

    Absolutely beautiful! Love these photos for inspiration!

  8. MichelleGervais 10/18/2011

    I could not agree more, tractor1! I've worked for a public garden in the past, have many friends who work in public gardens, and have met oodles of gardeners at public gardens around the country. Lemme tell ya, they're not in it for the money. They just happen to do what they love for a living, and they're thrilled to share what they've learned with me and our readers (they get just as excited as you guys do when their work is featured here). They and the gardens they create are unmistakably real, and really, public gardens exist for the public's inspiration and enjoyment, thanks to the generous people who have funded them throughout the years.

    That said, I love today's garden, too! Julie, that canna and anemone combo is KILLER.

  9. greenthumblonde 10/18/2011

    Mmmm. All I need is a hot cup of tea.

  10. soilgoil 10/18/2011

    I come from a family of avid gardeners, including a young professional with advanced degrees in horticulture. I myself am a veteran Master Gardener. But like tractor1, I want to give credit to the volunteers who give so much time, talent and energy at public gardens. My sister is one of them. When budget cuts forced layoffs at the University of California, Santa Cruz arboretum, she and another RN jumped in to renovate several of the overgrown and sadly neglected gardens. The results of their many hours of labor are evident. These ladies, and a host of other volunteers, have made the difference between a weedy jungle and a tranquil oasis where everyone may enjoy the glory of nature. That being said, I want to commend Julie for her lush, lovely October garden. And thank you, Michelle, for giving ALL gardeners their due.

  11. MichelleGervais 10/18/2011

    Volunteers are truly amazing. Thanks for spotlighting them, tractor1 & soilgoil!

  12. user-7006900 10/18/2011

    Thanks everybody for your very kind comments on our garden!

    As a mommy to three little ones, I do most of my gardening during afternoon times. But it really is my reading about all sorts of gardens - public and private - that fuels me to keep trying to better my plant combinations and succession plantings.

    It is so encouraging to us home gardeners to see other home gardens done in spare time with limited funds! (My plants all come from our small-town nursery and from searching big-box stores bargains, for example.) But it is also so valuable for us to look, and spend time, at public gardens and see what we can learn from them. We are all in the pursuit of creating Beauty, after all!

    Thanks,
    Julie Witmer

  13. user-7006885 10/18/2011

    Maybe regular people as opposed to professional gardeners would make for a better distinction between the two.

    In general, professionals with degrees in horticulture certainly have an edge as to knowledge about placement and color schemes as well as the varying cultural habits of plants. Also someone working for a public garden will have more money to spend on hardscaping and plant material that most home gardeners.

    Regular people for the most part just stumble along slowly gaining knowledge by trial and error and lots of reading in the meantime. It takes awhile to get there, and a lot never make it.

    As a result wonderful gardens like the one featured today demonstrate what can be accomplished by someone working with fewer tools than a professional and therefore are more encouraging to the general run of gardeners.

  14. Vespasia 10/18/2011

    So lovely, a really natural garden that makes the transition from summer into fall so well, gorgeous

  15. Neha4 07/27/2021

    Thank you to this beautiful and lovely post freerobuxnoverification i am very impressed with your all hard work.

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