Garden Photo of the Day

Eve’s garden in Tennessee, Day 2: Containers

This hanging basket is filled with baby tears with a jewel vine mixed in.  It is planted in a calf basket with a metal spider at the top.  It hangs from a chain made of old metal tools and horse bits.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Eve J.

When Eve sent in all of the photos of her garden a couple of days ago, I knew I wanted to feature her containers all on their own. They may not be over-the-top flashy, but they’re awesome! I love how she uses found objects as both containers and as embellishments for her designs. Look closely, and you’ll see what I mean. The captions for each photo are explanations from Eve. Enjoy!

This pot was designed with different shades of green, including southern maidenhair fern, jewels of opar, and a rush.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Eve J.
This metal container is a repurposed deep fat fryer I pulled from the garbage at a construction site.  It contains begonias and salvia.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Eve J.

The blue pots contain a miniature horsetail reed with old rusted augers and a fiber optic grass with pieces of twisted copper metal.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Eve J.
An old crock is planted with a small variety of spathiphyllum and variegated basket grass.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Eve J.
The white of the crock was repeated in a white and green plant combination, containing carex ‘Evergold’ sedge, polka dot plant, and a corkscrew rush.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Eve J.
More white and green–I was into that one year.  I really like the look of the ‘Evergold’ sedge, shrimp plant, decorative corn, wire vine, and a rush.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Eve J.
This hanging basket is filled with baby tears with a jewel vine mixed in.  It is planted in a calf basket with a metal spider at the top.  It hangs from a chain made of old metal tools and horse bits.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Eve J.
This pot was designed with different shades of green, including southern maidenhair fern, jewels of opar, and a rush.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Eve J.
This metal container is a repurposed deep fat fryer I pulled from the garbage at a construction site.  It contains begonias and salvia.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Eve J.

The blue pots contain a miniature horsetail reed with old rusted augers and a fiber optic grass with pieces of twisted copper metal.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Eve J.
An old crock is planted with a small variety of spathiphyllum and variegated basket grass.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Eve J.
The white of the crock was repeated in a white and green plant combination, containing carex ‘Evergold’ sedge, polka dot plant, and a corkscrew rush.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Eve J.
More white and green–I was into that one year.  I really like the look of the ‘Evergold’ sedge, shrimp plant, decorative corn, wire vine, and a rush.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Eve J.

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Comments

  1. dukeofargy 02/08/2012

    Very attractive. I really like the use of the "found objects" as containers. Well done.

  2. tractor1 02/08/2012

    Outdoor potted plants are great, I just need to remember to water mine. Good use of salvage containers.

  3. Steepdrive 02/08/2012

    Love her container plantings. I wonder if Eve winters them over? I'm trying that for the first time this year.

  4. User avater
    meander_michaele 02/08/2012

    By not being overly dependent on annual flowers, Eve's planting choices look like they would continue to give their A game throughout the season (Of course, as long as they are watered). I really like the simplicity and blending of color choices. The more serene impression they impart fits in with the gentle calming energy of a shade garden.

  5. siesperanza 02/08/2012

    Very nice. Love the recycled parts. I'm going to be on the lookout for a deep fat fryer.

  6. pattyspencer 02/08/2012

    All are very nice arrangements. I have a ton of pots that I could be creative with - these pictures give me hope.

  7. GreenGrowler 02/08/2012

    Eve, your container compositions are stunning in their simplicity. I have learned that foliage in pots really shines for the long-term - no worries about fading flowers. Yours are definitely winners!

  8. KatyS 02/08/2012

    Love them all, but spathiphyllum/basket grass and begonia/salvia are my favorites. Beautiful work! When are you pouring the drinks?

  9. meemasbug5 02/08/2012

    Eve's gardens and containers are great. Her historic home sounds very interesting too. Is it possible to see outside pictures of her home? I'm sure the overall effect would be great! Thanks for sharing.

  10. sheilaschultz 02/08/2012

    Eve, your containers are so rich in texture, flowers are definitely not needed. Each one pictured is filled with so many interesting aspects, it's like going on a treasure hunt. Thanks!

  11. GarPho 02/08/2012

    I like the subtlety of these container arrangements. They are very calming and effective. Some speakers on this subject insist you pack containers with many different plants and I don't think that is always best. Simple is good. Thanks for sharing them.

  12. cstewart12 02/08/2012

    WOW!! Love your yard and the containers. The containers have a good mix of plants and they were not cramed in. I think sometimes there are toooooo many plants in a container and they don't get the water or space they need to grow. I can't wait to find a fryer basket.

    I do have a question though.....what is a calf basket?

    Thanks,
    Cathy

  13. terieLR 02/09/2012

    I spy house plants... and love it! The last couple of years we have been able to cut cost by doing the same. Love your look Eve. As busy as a garden may appear, simplicity can still be achieved by minimizing the color scheme. Well done!

  14. LucindaP 02/09/2012

    Fabulous containers! Do you know the latin names for 'baby tears' and 'jewel vine'? Those don't look like the baby tears I know. The trouble with common names is that they vary from region to region. Thanks for any plant ID. Eve really knows how to combine the plants!

  15. EveJ 02/09/2012

    I found the jewel vine is also called a porcelain vine. I know common names are hard but in the south that is what we called it. One site I found is http://www.daytonnursery.com/encyclopedia/vines/ampelopsis.htm.
    Eve J.

  16. EveJ 02/09/2012

    Sorry, link did not work. The scientific name is
    Ampelopsis brevipedunculata 'Elegans

    I found it at Port Kells nurseries.
    Eve J.

  17. jlittle14 02/16/2012

    I googled baby tears and all I come up with is Solerolia. Can anyone identify the plant?

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