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Stewartia pseudocamellia (Japanese stewartia)

Stewartia pseudocamellia Photo/Illustration: Steve Aitken

(Based on 1 user review)

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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Botanical Name: Stewartia pseudocamellia stew-AR-tee-ah soo-doe-kah-MEL-ee-ah Common Name: Japanese stewartia Genus: Stewartia
A multi-stemmed, deciduous tree with a rounded columnar form, stewartia features stunning bark that exfoliates in strips of gray, orange, and reddish brown once the trunk attains a diameter of 2 to 3 inches. Serrated foliage emerges bronzy purple in spring, develops into a dark green by summer, and turns red or orange in the fall. In midsummer, "glamorous" white camellia-like flowers open in random succession and are followed by pointed brown seed pods, which are persistent but not very ornamental.
Noteworthy characteristics: This tree grows somewhat slowly until established, eventually reaching up to 40 feet tall and 20 feet wide. It's an excellent specimen tree.
Care: Grow in moist, acidic, well-drained soil in full morning sun or partial shade. Avoid a site with hot afternoon sun. Does not do well in areas where temperatures remain high during the night.
Propagation: Take greenwood cuttings in early summer, or semiripe cuttings in mid- to late summer.
Problems: Infrequent.
Height Over 30 ft.
Spread 15 ft. to 30 ft.
Growth Pace Slow Grower
Light Full Sun to Part Shade
Moisture Medium Moisture
Characteristics Interesting Bark; Showy Fall Foliage; Showy Flowers; Showy Foliage
Bloom Time Summer
Flower Color White Flower
Uses Flowering Tree, Specimen Plant/ Focal Point
Seasonal Interest Winter Interest, Spring Interest, Summer Interest, Fall Interest
Type Trees

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