Dutch crocus

Crocus vernus

Photo/Illustration: 
David Cavagnaro
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Dutch crocus (Crocus vernus)
KROW-kus VER-nus
Genus:  Crocus
Dutch crocus is one of the hardiest, if not the hardiest, crocus species readily available to home gardeners. A true harbinger of spring, it can be planted in borders, rock gardens, and even lawns. After flowering, the foliage must be left intact until it withers, which may cause lawn-mower anxiety in some gardeners. Often sold as "mixed crocus," cultivars of this species are typically white, lilac, or purple and white striped.
Noteworthy Characteristics:  Very early blooming; naturalizes in lawn.
Care:  Provide full sun to light shade and average, well-drained soil. In fall, plant corms four inches deep in groups of six or more. Lift and separate them after four or five years, discarding the mother corm.
Propagation:  Divide every four or five years.
Problems:  Nothing serious, but squirrels and mice may eat the corms.

Overview

Height
Less than 6 in.
Spread
Less than 6 in.
Growth Habit
Clumps
Growth Pace
Moderate Grower
Light
Full Sun to Part Shade
Moisture
Medium Moisture
Maintenance
Low
Characteristics
Showy Flowers
Bloom Time
Early Spring,
Spring
Flower Color
Purple/Lavender Flower,
White Flower
Uses
Beds and Borders,
Container,
Formal Garden,
Naturalizing,
Woodland Garden
Style
Cottage Garden,
Rock Garden
Seasonal Interest
Spring Interest
Type
Bulbs

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