Dutch crocus

Crocus vernus

Photo/Illustration: 
David Cavagnaro
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Dutch crocus (Crocus vernus)
KROW-kus VER-nus
Genus:  Crocus

Dutch crocus is one of the hardiest, if not the hardiest, crocus species readily available to home gardeners. A true harbinger of spring, it can be planted in borders, rock gardens, and even lawns. After flowering, the foliage must be left intact until it withers, which may cause lawn-mower anxiety in some gardeners. Often sold as "mixed crocus," cultivars of this species are typically white, lilac, or purple and white striped.

Noteworthy Characteristics: 

Very early blooming; naturalizes in lawn.

Care: 

Provide full sun to light shade and average, well-drained soil. In fall, plant corms four inches deep in groups of six or more. Lift and separate them after four or five years, discarding the mother corm.

Propagation: 

Divide every four or five years.

Problems: 

Nothing serious, but squirrels and mice may eat the corms.

Overview

Height
Less than 6 in.
Spread
Less than 6 in.
Growth Habit
Clumps
Growth Pace
Moderate Grower
Light
Full Sun to Part Shade
Moisture
Medium Moisture
Maintenance
Low
Characteristics
Showy Flowers
Bloom Time
Early Spring,
Spring
Flower Color
Purple,
White
Uses
Beds and Borders,
Container
Style
Cottage Garden,
Rock Garden
Seasonal Interest
Spring Interest
Type
Bulbs