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Podcast: Let's Argue About Plants

Episode 31: Plants for Privacy

Whether you need subtle separation from the neighbors or to completely block an ugly view, we’ve got the shrubs for you

Many years ago, at a previous home, Danielle had neighbors who liked to use their in-plain-view hot tub in the buff. Memories of that prompted this week’s podcast discussion on great varieties of plants for privacy. We’ll explore evergreen and deciduous options and how both types can be used to provide unobtrusive separation or to create a wall of total exclusion. So if you’re looking for ways to block out the nosy—or nude—neighbors, we’ve got some great recommendations.

 

 

Expert: Ed Gregan, Northeast field representative for Carlton Plants in Dayton, Oregon.

 

 

One of the least expensive and fastest-growing options for an evergreen privacy screen is white pine (Pinus strobus and cvs., Zones 3–8). Even though their bases can get a bit spindly over time, they’re still a long-lived option that offers a lot of versatility.

 

Although in a previous episode we ragged on beautybush (Kolkwitzia amabilis, Zones 4–8) for having a short-flowering period in spring, it does form an impenetrable mass of dense branches, making it an ideal candidate for informal screening.

 

Another deciduous option, winter hazel (Corylopsis pauciflora, Zones 6–8), also forms a thicket of stems that is dense enough to obscure the view of the neighbors beyond. When it bursts into bloom in early spring, the small buttercup flowers are just about as charming as it gets.

 

Steve and Danielle can never remember which type of arborvitae is deer-resistant, but luckily this week’s expert, Ed Gregan, can. Western arborvitae (Thuja plicata and cvs., Zones 5–7) grows quickly, is evergreen, and has a more natural and relaxed habit than its deer-prone cousin, Eastern arborvitae (Thuja occidentalis, Zones 2–7).

 

 

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Comments

  1. User avater
    KennethNguyen 01/23/2019

    amazing

  2. User avater
    SamBaker 01/23/2019

    wonderful

  3. User avater
    CynthiaDow 01/24/2019

    great

  4. User avater
    LouisJimenez 01/28/2019

    nice

  5. User avater
    devinkoblas 01/28/2019

    wonderful

  6. User avater
    MarkParker 02/02/2019

    great

  7. Musette1 02/06/2019

    you guys! these podcasts are always so informative and also charming! I have a dense hedge of Japanese Willow along my back fence - except for the fact that I have to rip bindweed out of it every year, it provides a lovely, multicolored screen in my 5b garden. and one plant will make 40 plants, if you let it - just cut & root!

  8. User avater
    JimmyCox 02/21/2019

    i like it

  9. User avater
    KevinHuggins 03/02/2019

    graceful

  10. User avater
    RonaldTague 03/08/2019

    like it

  11. User avater
    BenjaminShaw 04/15/2019

    Good one!

  12. User avater
    LauraWilliams 05/01/2019

    Very Nice!

  13. User avater
    JohnPrice6 05/15/2019

    amazing

  14. User avater
    ArmandLewis 05/16/2019

    i like it

  15. User avater
    AnnaMartinez 06/03/2019

    Amazing!

  16. User avater
    PatrickMclaren 08/14/2019

    wonderful

  17. User avater
    RodgerMckinley 09/19/2019

    Really Awesome!

  18. User avater
    AshlieDPerron 10/12/2019

    Very nice!

  19. User avater
    JakeHouck 11/09/2019

    Nature lovers! good job

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