Swamp haw

Viburnum nudum

Photo/Illustration: 
J. Paul Moore
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Swamp haw (Viburnum nudum)
vy-BURN-um new-dum
Genus:  Viburnum

This plant produces a myriad of tiny white flowers set in wide, stalked flower heads. The white flowers appear in early summer, then mature to egg-shaped berries that turn from green to creamy-pink, deepening throughout the summer and ending in a blue-black hue in autumn. Plants grow 12-15 feet tall and 6 feet wide.

Care: 

Provide rich, moist, and very acidic soil. It tolerates wet soils. It does well in shade but blooms best in almost full sun.

Propagation: 

Take greenwood cuttings in summer.

Problems: 

Viburnum beetle, gray mold (Botrytis), rust, downy mildew, powdery mildew, wood rot, Verticillium wilt, leaf spots, and dieback. Aphids, scale insects, weevils, Japanese beetles, mealybugs, and tree hoppers.

Overview

Height
10 ft. to 15 ft.
Spread
10 ft. to 15 ft.
Growth Pace
Moderate Grower
Light
Full Sun to Part Shade
Moisture
Medium Moisture
Maintenance
Low
Characteristics
Attracts Song Birds,
Native,
Showy Fruit
Bloom Time
Early Summer
Flower Color
White
Uses
Beds and Borders
Style
Cottage Garden,
Woodland Garden
Seasonal Interest
Summer Interest
Type
Shrubs