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Browse Plants

Narrowed By:Type: Shrubs+ Flower Color: Yellow+ Seasonal Interest: Spring+ Height: 6 - 10 ft.
Displaying 1 - 11 of 11 listings   Sort By: Sort
Berberis thunbergii f. atropurpurea Berberis thunbergii f. atropurpurea
(Red Japanese barberry)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Red Japanese barberry is a deciduous shrub with multi-season interest. Most striking are the deep reddish purple inch-long leaves. In spring, scented yellow flowers appear on arching stems. This barberry is an excellent hedge pland, and it also looks good in the middle to rear of beds and borders. Watch out for the brittle, three-pronged thorns. -Gerald Gibbens, Regional Picks: Northwest, Fine Gardening issue#120

Cotinus coggygria 'Ancot' Cotinus coggygria 'Ancot'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This specimen is grown for its stunning golden leaves, which turn to brilliant shades of orange and red in autumn. It may or may not produce the smoke-like plumes typical of the genus. 

Kerria japonica 'Pleniflora' Kerria japonica 'Pleniflora'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant is a double-flowered cultivar of a suckering shrub from China and Japan. 'Pleniflora' is a very vigorous grower and bears large, fluffy yellow flowers in spring. It is slightly less hardy than the species. Leaves are sharply toothed and bright green. Grow in a shrub border or an open woodland area.

Kolkwitzia amabilis Kolkwitzia amabilis
(Beautybush)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Deciduous, suckering shrub bearing a profusion of bell-shaped flowers, pale to deep pink with a yellow throat, in late spring and early summer. Dark-green foliage adds appeal when not in bloom.

Lindera benzoin Lindera benzoin
(Spicebush)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This dioecious shrub has much to offer the garden. Male plants have showier, tiny, pale yellow flowers in early spring, but the female counterparts take center stage in early fall, when they're laden with half-inch-diameter berries that turn from green to yellow to high-gloss crimson. About the same time, the leaves turn a hypnotic soft yellow and make the red berries visually pop. Spicebush becomes a large, 5- to 8-foot-tall shrub that is slightly wider than tall. It is the preferred food for the black and blue spicebush swallowtail butterfly larvae.

Mahonia bealei Mahonia bealei
(Leatherleaf mahonia, Beale's barberry)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Leatherleaf mahonia  is a thick shrub with a formal feel. Its stiff, green-blue foliage looks something like holly foliage, and in spring, airy clusters of tiny, golden yellow flowers appear. These are followed in fall by inky blue berries. Consider this plant for a a mixed-shrub foundation planting, or use it as a hedge plant. -Nellie Neal, Regional Picks: Southeast, Fine Gardening issue #127

Myrica pensylvanica Myrica pensylvanica
(Northern bayberry, Bayberry)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This North American coastal native exhibits quiet beauty and an easy-going habit. It grows to 10 feet tall, and spreads slowly to form colonies with glossy, semi-evergreen aromatic leaves.  It looks equally at home as a hedge, in an herb garden, or in a natural meadow.

Rhododendron calendulaceum Rhododendron calendulaceum
(Flame azalea)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant's leaves are mid-green, and softly hairy on both sides. In late midseason, as leaves emerge or just after, this plant bears lax trusses of yellow to dark reddish orange flowers. It grows to 8 feet tall and wide.

Rosa chinensis 'Mutabilis' Rosa chinensis 'Mutabilis'
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This beauty is prized for the unusual qualities of its flowers, which bloom continuously from spring until frost. The single cupped flowers open a honey-yellow, then they become coppery-pink, then watermelon, and finally a rich mahogany. The foliage is reddish purple, disease-resistant, and is evergreen in warm climates. This rose can be treated as a shrub or trained as a climber, reaching 10 feet high and 6 feet wide.

Sambucus racemosa ‘Sutherland Gold’ Sambucus racemosa ‘Sutherland Gold’
(European red elder, Golden elderberry)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This choice specimen has a graceful habit with finely divided golden foliage that emerges as bronze. It is less susceptible to sun scorch than the other gold varieties. It bears creamy white flowers that mature into red fruits. 

Ziziphus obtusifolia Ziziphus obtusifolia
(Graythorn)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Appropriately named, this open shrub has grayish green leaves and stiff, thorn-tipped branches. With inconspicuous, pale yellow-green flowers in late spring, the pea-size fruits that follow are a showy blue-black. These fruits appeal to birds, and the thorny branches are ideal protection for nesting. Graythorn is a fine backdrop for bold plantings of succulents.


Displaying 1 - 11 of 11 listings   Sort By: Sort