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Browse Plants

Narrowed By:Type: Grasses, Trees+ Botanical Name: G - L
Displaying 1 - 20 of 22 listings   1 | 2View AllNext > Sort By: Sort
Ginkgo biloba Ginkgo biloba
(Maidenhair tree)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

One of the oldest tree species on the planet, ginkgo grows only about a foot a year, reaching 50 to 80 feet. Female trees set fleshy fruit that smell unpleasant as they decay; they contain edible nuts.

Gleditsia triacanthos Gleditsia triacanthos
(Honeylocust)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Honey locust grows in the wild from Pennsylvania to Iowa and south to Georgia and Texas. In the landscape, this large, spreading, deciduous tree is valuable for its elegant form and pinnate, ferny leaves that cast a dappled shade. Flowers are generally inconspicuous, but are followed by unusual large seed pods. Fall color can be a nice yellow, but leaves sometimes fall without noticeably changing colors. The species has a thorny trunk and shoots, but thornless cultivars are available.

Hakea laurina Hakea laurina
(Pincushion hakea)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Through the fall and into winter, pincushion hakea provides beautiful cut flowers for the holidays; the foliage and seedpods are also great for arrangements. You can prune it into a bushy shape or a slender, small tree. As a member of the Protea family, pincushion hakea does not like phosphorus fertilizer, and like most Australian plants, it prefers to be well mulched so that its specialized roots can extract nutrients from the mulch layer.

Hakonechloa macra 'Aureola’ Hakonechloa macra 'Aureola’
(Golden Japanese forest grass)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Brightly variegated golden foliage with green stripes near the leaf margins give this Japanese forest grass its distinctive look. Too much shade can cause the golden portion to fade to lime green. This slow-growing may not reach a mature size for three years, but it is definitely worth the wait. -Matt Griswold, Regional Picks: Northeast, Fine Gardening issue #127

Hakonechloa macra ‘Nicholas’ Hakonechloa macra ‘Nicholas’
(‘Nicolas’ Japanese forest grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Some gardeners love Japanese forest grass because it looks like a baby bamboo grove or a lush woodland carpet. I love it because of the graceful motion that it adds to the garden—even on windless days. Such evocative beauty coupled with overall garden vigor (notably disease and deer resistance) are what make it a popular garden choice. In response to demand for greater variety, plant breeders have been working hard at increasing the palette of available cultivars. Of these newer selections, ‘Nicolas’, a dwarf variety that boasts lustrous green leaf blades with burgundy staining, is a notable standout.

 The pigment variegation of this plant pre­sents early in the season and intensifies to a vibrant reddish orange for a gorgeous late-season show. The long blades also add a nice texture to floral arrangements. Japanese forest grass is a versatile plant. It can stand alone as a ground cover or intermingle with other perennials, deciduous flowering shrubs, and spring bulbs. But because large varieties can sometimes swallow their perennial pairings and smother the lower foliage of shrubs, a dwarf cultivar, like ‘Nicolas’, offers a significant design benefit.

Halesia carolina Halesia carolina
(Carolina silverbell)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Carolina silverbell is a handsome tree with clean green foliage and an upright spreading habit. In mid- or late spring, hundreds of silvery-white bell-shaped flowers dangle from every branch before foliage emerges. The tree also has attractive bark, unusual four-winged seedpods, and yellow fall color.

Hamamelis × intermedia 'Pallida' Hamamelis × intermedia 'Pallida'
(Witch hazel)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

There are few better winter displays than the blossoms of 'Pallida' witch hazel. Bright green leaves line its flaring branches in spring and summer. After a display of yellow fall color, the plant shows its distinctive branch structure. Around the end of December, clusters of buds begin to open into spidery, pale yellow flowers. These cover the branches until early March, giving off a rich, fruity perfume. This small tree or large shrub grows up to 12 feet tall and wide.

Hamelia patens Hamelia patens
(Mexican fire bush, Scarlet bush, Firecracker shrub)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A tropical tree by design, the Mexican fire bush freezes to the ground in winter in Zones 8-11, but grows up to 5 feet tall by summer's end. The erect, branched, woody stems bear simple copper-toned leaves with small orange flowers bunched along the tips. It loves the heat, and the more you can give it, the more vigorous it will be.

Helictotrichon sempervirens Helictotrichon sempervirens
(Blue oat grass)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Dramatic powder blue foliage and spiky architecture are hallmarks of this plant. The leaves resemble rigid, tapering pieces of steel blue linguine collected in a porcupine-like dome.

Heptacodium miconioides Heptacodium miconioides
(Seven-son flower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The tiered branches of this fast-growing species are covered with white blossoms for over a month, starting in late summer. The flowers fade to reveal fuchsia calyxes that persist well into autumn. The pale, peeling bark can be exposed by pruning the lower branches of the interior. Although the form of the species is variable (single or multi-stemmed), it can usually be pruned into an elegant vase-shaped specimen, or maintained as a shrub.

Ilex aquifolium Ilex aquifolium
(English holly)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This tall, pyramidal, evergreen tree may be grown as a large shrub. Its evergreen, spiny foliage is leathery and glossy. Insignificant, though fragrant, flowers bloom in spring followed by red, orange, or yellow drupes that attract birds. Many cultivars are available.

Ilex crenata Ilex crenata
(Japanese holly)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This dense, evergreen holly reaches 6 to 10 feet tall and at least as wide. The species is rarely used in landscapes, but there are many cultivars available with more interesting shape and color. This plant grows slowly, but can be invasive. Its dark green leaves are lustrous and the black fruit is hidden beneath them, so it is not obvious as in other hollies. Use Japanese holly in foundation plantings, hedges, beds and borders, or formal gardens.

Ilex opaca Ilex opaca
(American holly)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This erect, evergreen large shrub or tree reaches 40 to 50 feet in height and 20 to 40 feet wide. Leathery dark green leaves have pointy, scalloped edges. Small green berries appear in late summer, maturing to crimson by autumn and persisting through the winter. Some ripen to yellow or orange. Use American holly as a specimen tree or in a woodland garden.

Imperata cylindrica and cvs. Imperata cylindrica and cvs.
(Japanese blood grass)
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This small ornamental grass is grown for its smooth, red-flushed leaves. Blooms are tan.

Isolepis cernua Isolepis cernua
(Fiber-optic grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This eye-catching sedge has silvery flower heads on the ends of its stems, making it appear like a tuft of fiber optic threads. It needs moist or wet soil and grows to about a foot tall and wide. Use it at waterside or in a container.

no image available Laburnum × watereri
(Golden chain tree)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Dense clusters of pendulous yellow flowers dangle from spreading branches in late spring. Leaves are dark green. Smooth green bark adds some winter interest.

Lagerstroemia fauriei Lagerstroemia fauriei
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a fast-growing, upright deciduous tree with delicate white flowers in early summer. As it matures, it develops a spectacular patchwork of bark in shades of gray, maroon, and brown. Oblong dark green leaves turn red-orange in autumn. Cultivar 'Fantasy' is vigorous and hardier than the species, with exceptional bark.

Lagerstroemia indica Lagerstroemia indica
(Crape myrtle)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Crape myrtle is an upright deciduous tree or large shrub. Dark green leaves emerge bronze. White, pink, red, or purple flowers appear from summer to autumn. Peeling gray-and-brown bark is attractive. 

Larix decidua and cvs. Larix decidua and cvs.
(European larch)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A deciduous conifer with a pyramidal growth habit, European larch has pendulous lower branches. In spring, needles emerge a shiny chartreuse, turning to deep green by summer and to sunset gold in late fall. Cultivars include 'Pendula', a weeping cultivar; 'Fastigiata', a narrow and upright variety; and 'Pyramidalis'.

no image available Larix kaempferi
(Japanese larch)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Fissured and scaly bark bark is tinted rust-brown in winter. Purplish red winter shoots are covered in a waxy bloom. Gray-green or bluish green leaves grow to 1.5 inches long.


Displaying 1 - 20 of 22 listings   1 | 2View AllNext > Sort By: Sort