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Browse Plants

Narrowed By:Type: Trees+ Zone: 6+ Botanical Name: P - R
Displaying 1 - 13 of 13 listings   Sort By: Sort
Parrotia persica Parrotia persica
(Persian parrotia tree, Persian ironweed)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Parrotia persica has one of the most beautiful foliage displays, in addition to year-round eye appeal and ease of maintenance. Reddish-purple when unfolding in spring, the leaves are a lustrous dark green in summer, and yellow to orange or scarlet in fall. Leaves hold their color for a long period. Older branches and trunks develop an exfoliating gray, green, white, and brown color that is a welcome asset in the winter garden. It grows successfully in Zones 4 to 8, tolerates sun and partial shade, and is easy to transplant. Often, vegetatively propogated forms offer more reliable fall color.

Paulownia tomentosa Paulownia tomentosa
(Empress tree, Foxglove tree, Princess tree, Royal pawlonia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This deciduous tree has thick shoots and large, lobed, bright green leaves. Fragrant pinkish lilac flowers appear in late spring with the foliage. When grown as a perennial, its robust shoots become sturdy stems 2 inches in diameter, with mammoth leaves as much as 2 feet across. Paulownia tomentosa can grow to 12 feet tall in a single season.

no image available Phellodendron amurense
(Amur cork tree)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This spreading tree with a graceful habit bears glossy, dark green leaflets. Thick shoots grow quickly when young—and more slowly as the tree reaches maturity. In fall, foliage turns a handsome shade of yellow and the tree bears clusters of blue-black berries. Deeply corrugated, pale gray-brown bark is a striking feature; unfortunately, it doesn’t develop until the tree matures.

Picea omorika ‘Nana’ Picea omorika ‘Nana’
(Dwarf Serbian spruce)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A compact plant with a mature height of 8 feet, this conifer is densely globe-shaped when young, becoming pyramidal as it ages. Needles are soft green on top, bluish green at the bottom.

no image available Picea pungens ‘Procumbens’
(Colorado blue spruce)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Procumbens' is similar to 'Pendula' in color but prostrate in habit, with cascading branches sometimes staying stiffly horizontal. Makes a spreading, undulating, mounding ground cover of silvery white needles.

Pinus densiflora 'Oculus Draconis' Pinus densiflora 'Oculus Draconis'
(Dragon's-eye Japanese red pine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This pine's needles are marked with bands of yellow and green. The buttery yellow variegation on the 3- to 5-inch needles is present year-round, but intensifies as summer turns to fall and persists into winter. The scaly, fissured bark is lovely, ranging in color from gray to rich rusty orange. This is a graceful tree when mature, with an irregular branching habit and tilted trunk.

Pinus nigra Pinus nigra
(Austrian pine, European black pine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Dark green, 4- to 6-inch-long needles and furrowed bark (on mature trees) make Austrian pine an attractive large specimen tree. It can also be used as screening, although its growth habit becomes more open with age.

no image available Pinus resinosa
(Red pine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The yellow-green leaves of this pine are 4 to 6 inches long. The bark is densely branched and flaky and reddish in the upper crown, scaly and pink-gray at the base. The tree has thick orange to red-brown shoots, chestnut-brown female cones, and purple male cones.

no image available Pinus strobus 'Fastigiata'
(Eastern white pine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This robust evergreen tree has a narrowly columnar crown with ascending branches, slender gray-green leaves, and smooth gray bark. Tapered green female cones ripen to brown.

Prunus virginiana 'Schubert' Prunus virginiana 'Schubert'
('Schubert' choke cherry)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Schubert' choke cherry, with its vivid foliage and pyramidal form, makes a fine focal point. Ephemeral, light pink flowers are followed by abundant, dark red-purple fruit that birds love. (Don't plant it near patios or walks, as they'll quickly be covered by bird droppings.) If the tree you buy isn't grafted onto nonsuckering rootstock; otherwise, suckers could become problematic as the years go by. -Ron Smith, Regional Picks: Upper Plains, Fine Gardening issue #120

Pseudolarix kaempferi Pseudolarix kaempferi
(Golden larch)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The golden larch is a lovely deciduous conifer whose lacy foliage turns golden in autumn. Its bright green needles are slightly larger than those of the European larch. Golden larch becomes a large pyramidal tree with an ultimate height of about 50 feet in cultivation. Its broad, horizontal branches are arranged in an open growth habit. In a big garden, it makes a neat specimen that never fails to attract attention.

Rhus typhina 'Tigereye Bailtiger' Rhus typhina 'Tigereye Bailtiger'
(Tiger eyes sumac, Staghorn sumac, Velvet sumac)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Lemon-lime foliage, fuzzy stems, and intense fall color make this sumac cultivar a standout. It grows into an upright, rounded form about 6 feet tall and as wide. New growth emerges chartreuse. Fall brings leaves of yellow, scarlet, and orange. Flowers are yellowish green and followed, on female plants, by hairy, dark red fruit. This plant spreads by suckers and can be invasive. The species is native to North America.

Robinia pseudoacacia 'Frisia' Robinia pseudoacacia 'Frisia'
(Golden locust)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This large, fast-growing tree has droopy leaves that stay sunny yellow from spring until frost, spiny shoots, and fragrant white flowers in late spring and early summer on pendent racemes. The flowers are followed by smooth brown seed pods that are also interesting. 'Frisia' is one of the cultivars that is grown more for foliage than for its flowers and it does not flower as freely as the species.


Displaying 1 - 13 of 13 listings   Sort By: Sort