Facebook LinkedIn Email Pinterest Twitter Instagram YouTube Icon Navigation Search Icon Main Search Icon Video Play Icon Audio Play Icon Headphones Icon Plus Icon Minus Icon Check Icon Print Icon Note Icon Heart Icon Filled Heart Icon Single Arrow Icon Double Arrow Icon Hamburger Icon TV Icon Close Icon Sorted Hamburger/Search Icon

This member-only article is part of our All Access subscription.

Member only
Southeast Regional Reports

The Fight Against Japanese Beetles

How to recognize and control these early summer pests

A Japanese beetle eating the flower of a rose (Rosa cv., Zones 3–9). Photo: Paula Gross.

When summer begins in your garden, whether on the patio or in the landscape, an ecosystem of living organisms brings insects to the front and center. The appearance of Japanese beetles, Popillia japonica, marks the month of June in the upper Southeast. With the beetles come the conversations: “Will they be bad this year?,” “Don’t bother with the traps, you know,” “I think I’m just going to get rid of my roses if I have to look at one more beetle orgy ruining my blooms!”

Take a closer look

You may already be more familiar than you would like to be with the Japanese beetle, an accidentally introduced pest that is now a permanent resident in the eastern and midwestern United States. Japanese beetles are a species of Asian scarab beetles, about half an inch long with metallic green heads and bodies, coppery wing shields, and six short…

This article is only available to All Access members

This article is available online for the first time ever exclusively for All Access members. Sign up for a free trial to access our entire collection of articles, videos, and plant records.

Start Free Trial

View Comments

Comments

Log in or become a member to post a comment on this article.

Related Articles

Member Exclusives

The Latest

Magazine Cover

Take your passion for plants to the next level

Subscribe today and save up to 44%

"As a recently identified gardening nut I have tried all the magazines and this one is head and shoulders above the pack."

Video

View All