previous
  • Pantone Color of the Year 2014: Radiant Orchid
    Pantone Color of the Year 2014: Radiant Orchid
  • Seed Starting in Speedling Trays
    Seed Starting in Speedling Trays
  • Pick Plants for Fragrance
    Pick Plants for Fragrance
  • Plant Finder: Spring Plants
    Plant Finder: Spring Plants
  • 3 Ways to Design with Containers
    3 Ways to Design with Containers
  • How to Grow Mustard
    How to Grow Mustard
  • 10 Seed-Starting Tips
    10 Seed-Starting Tips
  • Go Green on the Patio
    Go Green on the Patio
  • Homegrown / Homemade
    Homegrown / Homemade
  • Garden Design Basics
    Garden Design Basics
  • Bold and Beautiful Zinnias
    Bold and Beautiful Zinnias
  • NEW Video Series: There's a Better Way
    NEW Video Series: There's a Better Way
  • Black Plants Done Right
    Black Plants Done Right
  • 20 Gardenworthy Self-Sowers
    20 Gardenworthy Self-Sowers
  • DIY A-Frame Veggie Trellis
    DIY A-Frame Veggie Trellis
  • Planting the Right Way
    Planting the Right Way
  • Using Containers as Elements of a Design
    Using Containers as Elements of a Design
  • 10 Combinations for Shade
    10 Combinations for Shade
  • Rex Begonias
    Rex Begonias
  • Indoor Seed Starting Materials List
    Indoor Seed Starting Materials List
  • Building Better Borders
    Building Better Borders
  • Get your FREE Everyday Roses download now!
    Get your FREE Everyday Roses download now!
next

Genus Zauschneria (California fuchsia)

zowsh-NER-ee-ah Common Name: California fuchsia
From the dry slopes and chaparral of western North America come four species of subshrubby, evergreen or deciduous perennials commonly called California fuschia. They are grown for their ability to provide late season color in the form of scarlet, tubular flowers in terminal racemes. Hummingbirds love them. Use California fuchsia in a rock garden, border, or in a dry-stone wall. They need very little watering.
Noteworthy characteristics: Funnel-shaped scarlet flowers in late summer and fall. Very attractive to hummingbirds.
Care: Grow in a sheltered spot in moderately fertile, well-drained soil in full sun. They need little watering.
Propagation: Sow seed in a cold frame or root basal cuttings in spring, with bottom heat.
Problems: Slugs may eat new growth.

Species, varieties and cultivars for genus Zauschneria

no image available Zauschneria arizonica
(Hardy hummingbird trumpet, Arizona fuchsia, Firechalice, Wild fuchsia)
Be the first to rate this plant
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This heat-loving native Southwestern species has gray-green leaves and grows to 3 feet tall and 2 feet wide. Orangey red, tubular blossoms cover the plant in late summer and early fall.