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Hydrangea quercifolia (Oakleaf hydrangea)

Hydrangea quercifolia Photo/Illustration: Michelle Gervais

(Based on 2 user reviews)

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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Botanical Name: Hydrangea quercifolia hy-DRAIN-jah kwer-sih-FOE-lee-ah Common Name: Oakleaf hydrangea Genus: Hydrangea
Oakleaf hydrangeas originated along the sandy streams of the southeastern United States, and they are more drought tolerant than many other hydrangeas. Their matte green leaves are coarsely textured and deeply lobed, and in fall they turn red and purple. White flower heads form in spring, and as summer draws to a close they turn shades of pink, green, and ecru. -Nellie Neal, Regional Picks: Southeast, Fine Gardening issue #127
Care: Moist, well-drained soil.
Propagation: Sow seed in a cold frame in spring; take softwood cuttings in early summer, hardwood cuttings in winter. 
Problems:  Gray mold, slugs, powdery mildew, rust, ringspot virus, leaf spots.
Height 3 ft. to 6 ft.;6 ft. to 10 ft.
Spread 6 ft. to 10 ft.
Growth Pace Moderate Grower
Light Full Sun to Part Shade
Moisture Medium Moisture
Maintenance Low
Characteristics Showy Fall Foliage; Showy Flowers
Bloom Time Early Summer; Late Spring; Spring; Summer
Flower Color Pink Flower; Purple/ Lavender Flower; White Flower
Uses Hedge, Naturalizing
Style Shade, Woodland Garden
Seasonal Interest Spring Interest, Summer Interest, Fall Interest
Type Shrubs,Natives

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