HG/HM Series Introduction
HG/HM Series Introduction
Length: 01:11
How to Plant Strawberries
How to Plant Strawberries
Length: 04:41
How to Maintain Strawberries
How to Maintain Strawberries
Length: 02:01
How to Harvest Strawberries
How to Harvest Strawberries
Length: 03:10
Preserving Strawberries: How to Make Fruit Leather
Preserving Strawberries: How to Make Fruit Leather
Length: 06:40
Recipe: Classic Strawberry Shortcake
Recipe: Classic Strawberry Shortcake
Length: 08:13
How to Plant Onions
How to Plant Onions
Length: 03:29
How to Care for Onion Plants
How to Care for Onion Plants
Length: 02:18
How to Harvest and Cure Onions
How to Harvest and Cure Onions
Length: 02:32
How to Preserve Onions: Caramelized Onions
How to Preserve Onions: Caramelized Onions
Length: 07:40
Recipe: Roasted Onions Stuffed with Prosciutto and Parmesan
Recipe: Roasted Onions Stuffed with Prosciutto and Parmesan
Length: 05:54
How to Plant Tomatoes
How to Plant Tomatoes
Length: 05:28
How to Prune Tomato Plants
How to Prune Tomato Plants
Length: 04:07
How to Train Tomato Plants
How to Train Tomato Plants
Length: 02:11
How to Harvest Tomatoes
How to Harvest Tomatoes
Length: 02:54
How to Preserve Tomatoes: Fresh Tomato Purée
How to Preserve Tomatoes: Fresh Tomato Purée
Length: 06:11
Cooking with Tomatoes: Heirloom Tomato Napoleon with Parmesan Crisps
Cooking with Tomatoes: Heirloom Tomato Napoleon with Parmesan Crisps
Length: 07:04
How to Plant Basil
How to Plant Basil
Length: 02:51
How to Prune and Harvest Basil
How to Prune and Harvest Basil
Length: 03:09
How to Preserve and Store Basil: Pesto
How to Preserve and Store Basil: Pesto
Length: 04:43
Cooking with Basil: Thai Stir-Fry Chicken with Basil
Cooking with Basil: Thai Stir-Fry Chicken with Basil
Length: 05:04
How to Plant Squash
How to Plant Squash
Length: 03:47
How to Care for Squash Plants
How to Care for Squash Plants
Length: 03:20
How to Pollinate Squash
How to Pollinate Squash
Length: 01:59
How to Harvest Summer Squash
How to Harvest Summer Squash
Length: 02:06
Cooking with Squash: Summer Squash Linguine
Cooking with Squash: Summer Squash Linguine
Length: 04:26
Cooking with Summer Squash: Chocolate-Nut Zucchini Bread
Cooking with Summer Squash: Chocolate-Nut Zucchini Bread
Length: 07:24
How to Plant Carrots
How to Plant Carrots
Length: 03:49
How to Care for Carrot Plants
How to Care for Carrot Plants
Length: 02:46
How to Harvest Carrots
How to Harvest Carrots
Length: 02:27
How to preserve and store carrots
How to preserve and store carrots
Length: 06:58
Cooking with Carrots: Maple Pan-Roasted Baby Carrots
Cooking with Carrots: Maple Pan-Roasted Baby Carrots
Length: 04:19
How to Plant Blueberries
How to Plant Blueberries
Length: 05:34
How to Care for Blueberries
How to Care for Blueberries
Length: 04:46
How to Harvest Blueberries
How to Harvest Blueberries
Length: 03:20
How to Preserve and Store Blueberries: Blueberry Compote
How to Preserve and Store Blueberries: Blueberry Compote
Length: 04:47
Cooking with Blueberries: Blueberry Galette
Cooking with Blueberries: Blueberry Galette
Length: 07:48
How to Plant Potatoes
How to Plant Potatoes
Length: 05:10
How to Hill Potatoes
How to Hill Potatoes
Length: 04:07
How to Harvest Potatoes
How to Harvest Potatoes
Length: 02:54
How to Store and Prep Potatoes
How to Store and Prep Potatoes
Length: 03:50
Cooking with Potatoes: Roasted Red, White, and Blue Potatoes
Cooking with Potatoes: Roasted Red, White, and Blue Potatoes
Length: 05:12
How to Plant Arugula
How to Plant Arugula
Length: 03:10
How to Care for Arugula
How to Care for Arugula
Length: 03:37
How to Harvest Arugula
How to Harvest Arugula
Length: 02:29
How to prep and store arugula
How to prep and store arugula
Length: 04:49
Cooking with Arugula: Pasta with Arugula, Peas, and Prosciutto
Cooking with Arugula: Pasta with Arugula, Peas, and Prosciutto
Length: 06:10
How to Plant Peas
How to Plant Peas
Length: 05:44
How to Care For Peas
How to Care For Peas
Length: 05:09
How to Harvest Peas
How to Harvest Peas
Length: 02:18
How to Prep Peas
How to Prep Peas
Length: 04:12
Cooking with Peas: Fresh Pea and Mint Soup with Lemon Cream
Cooking with Peas: Fresh Pea and Mint Soup with Lemon Cream
Length: 07:02
How to Plant Watermelons
How to Plant Watermelons
Length: 04:33
How to Care for Watermelons
How to Care for Watermelons
Length: 03:33
How to Harvest Watermelons
How to Harvest Watermelons
Length: 02:47
How to Freeze and Preserve Watermelons
How to Freeze and Preserve Watermelons
Length: 09:19
Recipe: Watermelon Gazpacho Salsa
Recipe: Watermelon Gazpacho Salsa
Length: 07:22
How to Plant Eggplants
How to Plant Eggplants
Length: 04:26
How to Care for Eggplants
How to Care for Eggplants
Length: 02:54
How to Harvest Eggplants
How to Harvest Eggplants
Length: 02:30
How to Roast Eggplants
How to Roast Eggplants
Length: 06:33
Recipe: Eggplant Stacks
Recipe: Eggplant Stacks
Length: 06:42
How to Plant Garlic
How to Plant Garlic
Length: 04:20
How to Care for Garlic
How to Care for Garlic
Length: 02:40
How to Harvest Garlic
How to Harvest Garlic
Length: 02:46
Patch a Lawn with No Weeds
Patch a Lawn with No Weeds
Length: 01:37
How to Deep Plant Tomatoes
How to Deep Plant Tomatoes
Length: 02:32
Easy, Perfect Carrot Rows
Easy, Perfect Carrot Rows
Length: 01:09
Protecting Peonies
Protecting Peonies
Length: 01:11
Save Peonies for Later On
Save Peonies for Later On
Length: 01:50
Create Perfect Conditions for Roses
Create Perfect Conditions for Roses
Length: 02:16
Buy the Best Roses
Buy the Best Roses
Length: 01:07
Trick Plants with Different Needs into Sharing a Pot
Trick Plants with Different Needs into Sharing a Pot
Length: 01:05
Easy, Organic Apples are in the Bag
Easy, Organic Apples are in the Bag
Length: 01:16
Quickly Clean an Evergreen Grass
Quickly Clean an Evergreen Grass
Length: 01:05
Never Forget a Plant's Name Again
Never Forget a Plant's Name Again
Length: 00:39
Container Gardening Basics
Container Gardening Basics
Length: 01:55
Keep Herbicide Off the Plants You Love
Keep Herbicide Off the Plants You Love
Length: 01:46
Rows of Bulbs Come Tines at a Time
Rows of Bulbs Come Tines at a Time
Length: 01:19
An Easy Way to Repot a Cactus
An Easy Way to Repot a Cactus
Length: 01:13
Safely Remove Poison Ivy
Safely Remove Poison Ivy
Length: 01:31
How to Thin Peaches
How to Thin Peaches
Length: 02:32
Pruning Nepeta
Pruning Nepeta
Length: 00:57
How to Prune Panicle Hydrangeas
How to Prune Panicle Hydrangeas
Length: 01:33
How to Prune Mountain Laurel
How to Prune Mountain Laurel
Length: 04:34
How to Prune Crabapples
How to Prune Crabapples
Length: 04:27
How to Prune Shrub Roses
How to Prune Shrub Roses
Length: 03:55
How to Prune Beautyberry
How to Prune Beautyberry
Length: 02:14
How to Prune Smokebush
How to Prune Smokebush
Length: 02:47
The New Root Pruning Guidelines
The New Root Pruning Guidelines
Length: 02:19
Basic Pruning Tools
Basic Pruning Tools
Length: 04:41
Where to Cut
Where to Cut
Length: 01:25
Regular pruning helps to control the size and shape of your plants, and it's also a way to keep them healthy and productive. But it's important to know where to make your cuts. In this video, Lee Reich, author of The Pruning Book, published by The Taunton Press, demonstrates the right and wrong ways to cut.
Root Pruning Container Plants
Root Pruning Container Plants
Length: 06:23
If your container plant is rootbound—or just growing a little too vigorously for your liking—it may be a candidate for a process called root pruning. Watch as Lee Reich, author of Uncommon Fruits for Every Garden, demonstrates his technique.
Removing Root Suckers
Removing Root Suckers
Length: 05:04
Root suckers are vigorous vertical stems that ruin a tree's appearance. They also compete with, and eventually overgrow, tree trunks. In this video, Lee Reich, author of The Pruning Book, demonstrates how to remove root suckers.
Pruning Pines
Pruning Pines
Length: 04:44
Pines (Pinus spp. and cvs.), whether they are trees or shrubs, should be pruned during active shoot growth because this will allow sufficient time for the shoot to produce a new set of buds for next year’s growth. The current year’s new shoots, or "candles," can be cut with hand pruners or pinched off to the desired length. See it done in this video with Bert Cregg, an associate professor in the horticulture and forestry departments at Michigan State University.
Pruning Firs, Douglas Firs, and Spruces
Pruning Firs, Douglas Firs, and Spruces
Length: 04:39
The best time to prune these trees and shrubs is when they're dormant—either in late winter or late summer. You can prune to control height or to encourage fullness. Learn how to prune these single-needle conifers in this video with Bert Cregg, an associate professor in the horticulture and forestry departments at Michigan State University.
Pruning Conifers for Health
Pruning Conifers for Health
Length: 01:56
Pruning conifer trees and shrubs for health should be done anytime a problem pops up and can be safely corrected. Removing branches that have experienced winter damage, or branches that cross and could potentially rub against each other is important because these injuries can be an entry point for disease. Limbs that appear weak because of poor attachment angles (also called a narrow crotch) should also be pruned away. As the tree grows, excess bark accumulates in the crotch. This results in weakness because, over time, more bark and less wood holds the branch to the trunk. In this video, Bert Cregg, an associate professor in the horticulture and forestry departments at Michigan State University, demonstrates how to prune evergreen conifers (including arborvitae, junipers, chamaecyparis, yews, pines, hemlocks, firs, douglas firs, and spruces) for health.
Pruning Climbing Roses
Pruning Climbing Roses
Length: 04:24
Pruning climbing roses stimulates growth and flowering, and removes dead, weak or sickly canes that can drain energy from the rose and encourage disease. In this video, Peter Kukielski, curator of the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden at the New York Botanical Garden, demonstrates the best way to prune climbing roses.
Pruning Arborvitae, Junipers, and Chamaecyparis
Pruning Arborvitae, Junipers, and Chamaecyparis
Length: 02:08
Unlike some conifers, these trees will not form new buds on old wood. So if you cut back to the brown, aged stems, it won't grow back. Conifers with fan-like needles include arborvitae, junipers, and chamaecyparis. Learn how to prune these conifers in this video with Bert Cregg, an associate professor in the horticulture and forestry departments at Michigan State University.
How to Sharpen Pruners
How to Sharpen Pruners
Length: 04:37
There are a few good reasons to keep your pruning tools sharp. For one thing, it's easier to prune with a sharp blade than a dull one. But more important, a cleaner cut heals faster and more efficiently, resulting in a healthier plant that will be better prepared to fight disease and insect infestation. If you've ever wondered about how to sharpen pruners, then be sure to check out this video with Lee Reich. Reich is a horticultural consultant and the author of The Pruning Book, published by The Taunton Press.
How to Remove Dead Diseased Wood
How to Remove Dead Diseased Wood
Length: 03:25
Removing dead or diseased wood makes for more attractive trees and shrubs. It also helps to prevent disease from killing your plants. In this video, Lee Reich, author of The Pruning Book, published by The Taunton Press, demonstrates how to remove dead and diseased wood.
How to Prune Shrub Roses
How to Prune Shrub Roses
Length: 05:04
Pruning roses stimulates growth and flowering, and removes dead, weak or sickly canes that can drain energy from the rose and encourage disease. In this video, Peter Kukielski, curator of the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden at the New York Botanical Garden, demonstrates the best way to prune shrub roses. Related Videos: How to Prune Floribunda Roses How to Prune Hybrid Tea Roses Feeding and Mulching Roses Planting Garden Roses in Containers
How to Prune Hydrangeas
How to Prune Hydrangeas
Length: 03:43
Even the most experienced gardeners can be confused by pruning hydrangeas. Some are cut back in late summer; others are pruned in the spring or fall. And how do you know which ones you have? In this video, Clive Lodge, a professional gardener from Kent, Connecticut, provides a simple answer to the timing dilemma by dividing them into two categories: spring-blooming and fall-blooming. Then he demonstrates the right pruning techniques for both types. Read more about pruning hydrangeas.
How to Prune Hybrid Tea Roses
How to Prune Hybrid Tea Roses
Length: 04:53
Pruning roses stimulates growth and flowering, and removes dead, weak or sickly canes that can drain energy from the rose and encourage disease. In this video, Peter Kukielski, curator of the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden at the New York Botanical Garden, demonstrates the best way to prune hybrid tea roses. Related Videos: How to Prune Shrub Roses How to Prune Floribunda Roses Feeding and Mulching Roses Planting Garden Roses in Containers
How to Prune Floribunda Roses
How to Prune Floribunda Roses
Length: 04:50
Pruning roses stimulates growth and flowering, and removes dead, weak or sickly canes that can drain energy from the rose and encourage disease. In this video, Peter Kukielski, curator of the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden at the New York Botanical Garden, demonstrates the best way to prune shrub roses. Related Videos: How to Prune Shrub Roses How to Prune Hybrid Tea Roses Feeding and Mulching Roses Planting Garden Roses in Containers
A Survey of Pruning Tools
A Survey of Pruning Tools
Length: 09:24
Whether you are pruning hedges, shrubs, or fruit trees, the right tool makes all the difference. In this clip from the Fine Gardening Pruning DVD-ROM, horticulturist Lee Reich, Ph.D., of New Paltz, New York, and author of The Pruning Book, examines the key features on an array of pruning implements. You'll learn what the tools do, and what to consider when shopping for a new hand pruner, lopper, saw, pole pruner, or hedge shears.
Planting Roses
Planting Roses
Length: 04:06
How to Plant a Viburnum
How to Plant a Viburnum
Length: 02:37
How to Deep Plant Tomatoes
How to Deep Plant Tomatoes
Length: 02:32
Planting Ornamentals (Container-Grown)
Planting Ornamentals (Container-Grown)
Length: 04:56
Planting the right way can be the difference in a plant's survival. All too often we quickly dig a hole, plop in the plant, then kick dirt around it. No wonder so many plants never survive their first season. The best way to get a new plant off to a healthy start is to base your practices on how that plant is packaged. Packaging influences the condition of the roots and the root-ball soil, which, in turn, affects how to plant properly. So even if you know the basics, there is a good chance you will learn a trick or two in this video about planting container-grown ornamentals to increase the odds your plants will thrive. Related Videos Planting Balled and Burlapped Woodies Planting Bare-Root Plants
Planting Garden Roses in Containers
Planting Garden Roses in Containers
Length: 02:52
Select a rose that will stay in scale with the container without much heavy pruning. In terms of size, 24 to 36-inch-wide containers are ideal. For durability, lean toward cast stone or molded resin containers. While the popular half-whiskey barrels are a good size, they tend to decompose in wet climates unless they are heavily treated with preservatives. Andrew Schulman, a landscape designer and Fine Gardening author, shows how to plant roses in containers and adds a tip to aid in watering. Related Videos: How to Prune Shrub Roses How to Prune Hybrid Tea Roses How to Prune Floribunda Roses Feeding and Mulching Roses
Planting an Ornamental (Bare Root)
Planting an Ornamental (Bare Root)
Length: 04:18
Planting the right way can be the difference in a plant's survival. All too often we quickly dig a hole, plop in the plant, then kick dirt around it. No wonder so many plants never survive their first season. The best way to get a new plant off to a healthy start is to base your practices on how that plant is packaged. Packaging influences the condition of the roots and the root-ball soil, which, in turn, affects how to plant properly. So even if you know the basics, there is a good chance you will learn a trick or two in this video about planting bare-root plants to increase the odds your plants will thrive. Related Videos Planting Container-Grown Ornamentals Planting Balled and Burlapped Woodies
Plant an Easy-to-Water Strawberry Jar
Plant an Easy-to-Water Strawberry Jar
Length: 05:11
Keeping the soil in strawberry jars evenly moist can be challenging. Most jars are made of clay, which tends to dry out easily, and they're usually positioned in the sunniest spot in the garden. The design of the strawberry jar also makes it difficult to get water out to the sides of the container where the plants' roots are. In this video, Fine Gardening assistant editor Daryl Beyers demonstrates how to plant an easy-to-water strawberry jar to help these clay pots retain moisture.
Plant a Fall Asian Garden
Plant a Fall Asian Garden
Length: 06:12
Patti Moreno, the Garden Girl, experiments with a wide variety of vegetables, and one her favorites is her Asian kitchen garden. These fast-growing and cold hardy greens are a great solution to the fall and winter blues.
How to Plant Peonies
How to Plant Peonies
Length: 04:14
Peonies are among the most beloved herbaceous plants, but they can also be one of the most frustrating. It's not unusual for many gardeners to complain about their absence of blooms. While planting peonies in the proper conditions is important, most peonies hold back on blooming because they don’t like how they’ve been planted. To learn how to improve the odds of getting those glorious blooms, check out the following video on how to plant peonies.
How to Plant and Grow Garlic
How to Plant and Grow Garlic
Length: 02:44
We're pretty sure that once you taste homegrown garlic, you'll never again be satisfied with the mass-produced commercial varieties found in supermarkets. And garlic is ridiculously easy to grow. In this video, farmer Joe Smith, from Niantic, Connecticut, demonstrates how to plant garlic. Be sure to check out our in-depth articles on growing garlic: Garlic Begets Garlic and Grow Your Own Garlic.
How to Plant Alliums
How to Plant Alliums
Length: 01:27
Here are a few things you need to remember when planting alliums: - Plant them in the fall. - Get the root side down, with the pointy end up. - Get the planting depth right. If you plant your bulbs too deep, they may not have enough energy to make it to the soil’s surface. If you plant them too shallow, the blooms may topple over when it reaches its full height. In this video, Fine Gardening’s chief editor, Steve Aitken, demonstrates how to plant alliums.
How to Plant a Balled and Burlapped Tree
How to Plant a Balled and Burlapped Tree
Length: 03:38
Planting the right way can be the difference in a plant's survival. All too often we quickly dig a hole, plop in the plant, then kick dirt around it. No wonder so many plants never survive their first season. The best way to get a new plant off to a healthy start is to base your practices on how that plant is packaged. Packaging influences the condition of the roots and the root-ball soil, which, in turn, affects how to plant properly. So even if you know the basics, there is a good chance you will learn a trick or two in this video about planting balled-and-burlapped woodies to increase the odds your plants will thrive. Related Videos Planting Container-Grown Ornamentals Planting Bare-Root Plants
Selecting a Site For Your Vegetable Garden
Selecting a Site For Your Vegetable Garden
Length: 02:53
So you know you want to grow your own vegetables, but that's about all you know. Not to worry. Our video series, "How to Start a Vegetable Garden," will help you get your first veggie venture off to a good start. We’ll cover the basics: choosing a location, preparing the soil, starting your seedlings, and maintaining your garden for best results throughout the season.
Removing Sod and Vegetation
Removing Sod and Vegetation
Length: 03:06
When you're starting any kind of garden, you're going to need to remove the existing vegetation in the area. Some common methods you may read about are digging, tilling, smothering, and applying herbicides. We don't recommend applying herbicides, especially when you're starting a vegetable garden. Tilling has its pros and cons (which are outlined in the video), and digging, while simple, is exhausting for most people. In our opinion, smothering is the safest and easiest way to remove vegetation. Simply lay down newspaper where you want your bed to be, cover it with mulch, and wait a season for the newspaper to smother the grass and weeds.
How to Test Your Soil
How to Test Your Soil
Length: 02:14
One of the most important steps you can take in starting a vegetable garden is to make sure you have good soil. But you can't tell what condition your soil is in just by looking at it. That's where soil testing comes in. The most important things a soil test will tell you are your soil's pH, its texture, and its nutrient levels. The key to getting this information is to getting an accurate sample. First, start in one corner of the garden and dig a hole. A shovel produces a cone-shaped hole, removing more soil at the surface of your hole. Since you want your sample to offer an accurate cross-section of your soil, take a slice with a spade to a depth of about six inches. Continue to take slices from 6 to 12 areas around your garden so that each area is represented. Avoid any areas that would obviously skew your results, like areas next to a building. After you've taken all your slices, crumble up the soil and remove any rocks, bits of root and grass, and moss that you find. Spread it out to dry for about a day. Put it back into your container and mix it back up. Put a small sample in a sealable bag and mail it to your local extension service. What you'll get back will be information on your pH, your soil texture, the level of organic matter in your soil, and any other specific things you request. You'll also get fertilizer recommendations, amd you'll learn what your next steps are toward creating healthy soil for your garden. Next up: Learn how to clear away existing vegetation
Direct Sowing
Direct Sowing
Length: 04:16
Some seeds prefer to be sown outside directly into the ground, rather than being started indoors. There are two different methods you can use when you’re directly sowing seeds into the garden: the hill method, and the trough method. The method you use will depend on what type of seed you’re sowing. Check the back of your seed packet if you’re not sure which method to use. The Hill Method Piling your soil into a mound ensures that it will heat up quickly, which can be beneficial for seeds that need very warm soil to germinate. If you’re using raised beds, you probably don’t have to sow your seeds into mounds since the soil is already elevated off the ground. Pile the soil into a mound that is roughly 1 1/2 feet in diameter and 6 inches high. Using your finger, poke three or four small holes, about two inches apart, in the top of the mound, planting one seed per hole. If you’re not sure how deep to plant the seeds, check the back of your seed packet. Once the seeds are planted, water them gently. After the seeds have germinated, they will need to be thinned. Select one or two of the strongest seedlings to leave behind, and remove the weaker ones. The Trough Method This is probably the simplest way to plant seeds outdoors. Using two fingers, dig a very shallow trench. Then sprinkle the seeds lightly and evenly along the length of the trench. Gently push a thin layer of soil over the seeds to close up the trench you just dug. Make sure to check the back of the seed packet to see how deeply the seeds should be sown. Then water in your seeds gently so they’re evenly moist. When your seedlings start to sprout, they will need to be thinned. Follow the directions on the back of your seed packet if you’re unsure of how to space your plants. Remove the weaker seedlings and leave behind the strongest.
How to Build Raised Garden Beds
How to Build Raised Garden Beds
Length: 02:52
If your soil isn't the greatest or you just don't feel like digging, raised beds can be a great solution for your vegetable garden. Materials Raised beds can be made out of all different kinds of materials, but wood is the most common option. The obvious choice for your wood may seem like pressure-treated lumber, but because it contains copper, an untreated wood that weathers well might be a better option. Douglas Fir is readily available in our part of the country and relatively inexpensive. Other choices might be Cypress or Redwood. Tools You'll Need Cordless drill 3.5" galvanized decking screws Six 8-foot-long 2x6 boards Six 4-foot-long 2x6 boards Four 2-foot-long 4x4 boards Building the Bed To make the long sides of the bed, screw three 8-foot 2x6 boards to two corner posts. Pre-drill the holes before screwing into the wood to make life a bit easier. Having an extra person around to help you position the boards correctly and make sure they’re flush. To build the short sides, stand two of the constructed long ends upright about four feet apart. Screw the short 2x6 boards to the corner posts so that they’re flush. If you’re not building on level ground, a speed square and a level will come in extremely handy.
Starting Seeds
Starting Seeds
Length: 06:33
Starting seeds indoors is cheap and easy, and it allows you to grow vegetables that you wouldn't find in your local nursery or garden center. Most seeds can be started 6 to 8 weeks before your last frost date.
Early Pruning of Tomato Plants
Early Pruning of Tomato Plants
Length: 02:20
Tomatoes are surprisingly easy to maintain. Young tomato plants will need some initial pruning early in the season. Here's how to ensure that your tomatoes remain healthy and produce delicious fruit. Step 1: Remove all of the branches below the first flower cluster. You'll know it's time to start pruning your tomato plants when you notice your plant's first flowers. Remove all of the branches that are growing below the first set of flower buds. While it may seem drastic, there are two good reasons to do this: First, low-growing branches tend to become diseased because they're so close to the soil. And second, since none of the lower branches will produce fruit, those branches will just drain the plant of its energy. Step 2: Remove all suckers. Suckers are small, secondary branches, or side shoots, that appear in the crotch area, or axil, between the branches and the main stem. Suckers drain the tomato plant of precious energy that would be better used producing tomatoes for you to eat. Once you've completed these maintenance tasks, your tomatoes will be off to a great start.
When are my peppers ready to pick?
When are my peppers ready to pick?
Length: 01:56
Many people don't realize that all peppers start off green. For peppers to turn other shades--like red, orange, and yellow--they need to be left on the plant to mature for 30 days or longer. Sometimes a pepper can appear to be ripening when it actually has sunscald. Sunburn often happens when a pepper plant has been blown over by wind and the leaves are no longer there to shade the peppers.
How to Harvest Soybeans (Edamame)
How to Harvest Soybeans (Edamame)
Length: 01:36
Soybeans, or edamame, are widely known for their health benefits. They are also pretty tasty and often found on the menu at Japanese restaurants. When you're harvesting soybeans, look toward the bottom of the plant first. The lower pods tend to ripen faster than the pods at the top. Ripe soybeans will appear large and plump in their shells, while immature soybeans will be thinner and flatter. If you compare a ripe soybean and an unripe one side-by-side, it'll be easy to see which ones are ready for eating. Usually the whole plant will be ready for harvesting in about a week. But pick them pretty quickly--soybeans go from ready-to-eat to overripe in about ten days. A favorite way to prepare soybeans is to steam them until the beans are tender (about 5 to 7 minutes), salt them, and eat them straight out of the shell. Just don't eat the shells!
Squash Blossoms
Squash Blossoms
Length: 01:23
When is Corn Ready to Pick?
When is Corn Ready to Pick?
Length: 01:28
How can you tell when your corn is ripe to pick? First, look at the top ear on your corn plant. The top ear is always the first to ripen. It will look fatter than the other ears on the plant and it will start to lean away from the stalk, almost at a 90 degree angle. The silk on an ear that is ready to pick will turn brown, will feel very dry, and should peel right off in your hand. If the silk near the very tip of the ear of corn is dry, then that ear is very ripe for picking! The silk on an unripe ear of corn will feel soft, wet, and will be red in color. If the top ear on your corn plant is ripe, ears further down the stalk should ripen about ten days later.
A No-Till Garden
A No-Till Garden
Length: 03:31
Putting Your Vegetable Garden to Bed
Putting Your Vegetable Garden to Bed
Length: 03:18
Planting Out
Planting Out
Length: 05:00
Planting out is simple, but there's more to it than just digging a hole and tossing the plants in the ground. Here are some steps you can take to ensure healthy, hearty plants. Step 1: Harden off your seedlings If you're planting homegrown seedlings, you'll need to make sure your plants are hardened off. Hardening off is the process of acclimating your seedlings to the harsh conditions of the outdoors--getting them used to the heat, cold, wind, and sun. Put your seedlings outdoors in a protected location for an hour a day for about a week. Gradually increase their exposure until your young plants have adapted to the temperature fluctuations that they'll face outdoors. If you have plants from a nursery, always make sure to ask if they've been hardened off before you plant them. Step 2: Dig a hole Your hole should be as deep as the plant is in its container, and at least twice as wide. Digging a wide hole helps with soil aeration and ensures that the plant's roots will be able to spread. Step 3: Tease the roots If your plant is in a peat pot, first peel away the peat. Peat takes too long to break down and wicks moisture away from the plant's roots. If your plant is in any other kind of container, just pop the plant out of it. Use your fingers to loosen up the plant's roots (don' t be afraid to rough them up a little), especially if they are very dense or the plant looks rootbound. Step 4: Put the plant in the ground Place your plant in the ground at the same level it was in the pot. Then backfill around the plant. Push it snugly into the ground, but don't compact the soil too much. Step 5: Water Watering gets your plants off to a good start and helps to remove air pockets from the soil. Don't be alarmed if your plant wilts and looks miserable for a while. Plant go through transplant shock. It's normal, and watering well will help them settle in nicely. Step 6: Mulch Many people prefer straw for the vegetable garden because it breaks down quickly and can be cultivated into your beds at the end of the season, but any organic material will do. Hay should be avoided as it incorporates the seed pod at the top of the grass stalk, which means you'll have even more weeds to contend with. Pile mulch around your plants 2 to 3 inches deep and keep it away from the crown of the plants so you don't suffocate them.
Tour the Hollister House Garden
Tour the Hollister House Garden
Length: 03:21
Designing Container Groupings
Designing Container Groupings
Length: 03:36
Container groupings are an ideal solution for all kinds of problem areas. Groupings of pots can soften the geometry of a scene or create dramatic entries, hallways, and outdoor rooms. They can also teach you a lot about combining plants because you can move things around until you get it just right. In this video, author Steve Silk explains how he has adapted his thriller, filler, and spiller container recipe to container clusters.
Great Plants Deserve the Perfect Pot
Great Plants Deserve the Perfect Pot
Length: 04:59
It doesn't take long for a visit to the local garden center or greenhouse to become an overwhelming, hair-pulling experience. With dozens of plant and pot choices available, it can be difficult to pick just the right elements for the perfect container planting. In this video, Rita Randolph, of Randolph's Greenhouses, in Jackson, TN, demonstrates how to design a container planting by first selecting plants, and then finding a pot to match.
A Dynamic Design for a Garden Passageway
A Dynamic Design for a Garden Passageway
Length: 03:20
When Scott Endres moved into his home 12 years ago, he felt constricted by the amount of space available for gardening. With a small front yard, a tiny backyard, and a narrow side yard, he knew he would have to make the most of every square inch of space. The side garden proved to be the most challenging. He wanted it to be an experience, not just an expressway between the front and the back. He also needed more space for plantings, and wanted to enjoy this space as much as the other areas. So, he broadened the space psychologically and made it into a destination that would guests to linger as they passed from the public to the private areas of his garden. His success relied on wise hardscape decisions, the careful placement of plants and focal points, and the inventive use of repetition to pull it all together.
Selecting Trees for Structure
Selecting Trees for Structure
Length: 06:01
As gardeners, we evaluate a plant's ornamental characteristics before we consider adding it to our garden. We may want to know, for example, when a plant flowers or if it exhibits good fall color. Other concerns might be whether it is an evergreen or a deciduous shrub, or if a plant bears fruit or has colorful stems. But how often do we look at the form of a plant? Architectural structure is an important characteristic to consider, especially for winter interest. In this video, Andrew Bunting, curator of the Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, takes us on a walk through the arboretum, pointing out specimens with exceptional form, including cut-leaf Japanese maple, deodar cedar, European beech, and katsura tree. He also tells us what to look for—and what to avoid—when selecting young trees for our own gardens.
A Great Pot Inspires Its Planting
A Great Pot Inspires Its Planting
Length: 04:44
It doesn't take long for a visit at the local garden center or greenhouse to become an overwhelming, hair-pulling experience. With dozens of plant and pot choices available, it can be difficult to pick just the right elements for the perfect container planting. In this video, Rita Randolph, of Randolph's Greenhouses, in Jackson, TN, demonstrates how to design a container planting by first selecting a pretty pot.
Ornaments in the Garden
Ornaments in the Garden
Length: 04:52
"I love to embellish—my clothing, my house, and best of all, my garden," says Eve Thyrum, a volunteer at the Scott Arboretum at Swarthmore College and a member of the Hardy Plant Society. In this tour of her 2-1/4-acre garden, Eve shares some of her ideas for placing ornaments to develop motifs and create a sense of unity in the garden. Eve gardens with her husband, Per, in the verdant hills of Delaware, Pennsylvania. Her article Ornaments in the Garden appears in the November/December 2000 issue of Fine Gardening (#76).
Arrange a Late-Season Bouquet
Arrange a Late-Season Bouquet
Length: 02:17
There’s no need to strip your fall garden bare of flowers to make a great autumn arrangement. Start with a great vase like an antique pitcher or tin bucket, and then take a leisurely stroll around your garden. Take two or three stems of each interesting thing you see, like blooming ornamental grasses, black-eyed Susans, and hydrangeas. Most fall flowers look good even when they’re starting to fade so don’t discriminate. Don’t forget the foliage, either. A branch from a maple that’s starting to turn colors, a giant hosta leaf, or a few fern fronds from the woods add great bulk, color, and texture that highlight any blooms you might mix with them. Here is a list of the plants used in this video: Obedient plant (Physostegia virginiana cv., USDA Hardiness Zones 2-8) Variegated miscanthus (Miscanthus sinensis cv., Zones 4-9) Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii 'Goldsturm', Zones 4-9) Purple perilla (Perilla frutescens 'Atropurpurea', annual) Hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens 'Annabelle', Zones 4-9) Garlic chives (Allium tuberosum, Zones 4-8) Fountain grass (Pennisetum alopecuroides, Zones 6-9) Hayscented fern (Dennstaedtia punctilobula, Zones 3-8) Garden phlox (Phlox paniculata cv., Zones 4-8) 'Sum and Substance' hosta (Hosta 'Sum and Substance', Zones 3-9)
A Collector's Paradise
A Collector's Paradise
Length: 07:05
The first two questions visitors ask Patrick Anderson when they see his garden devoted to succulent plants are "What were you thinking?" and "Why these plants?" Patrick's answer goes straight to the reason most people garden: "These are the plants that have turned me on my whole life, and what could be more fun than to use them on this kind of scale?" Patrick never planned to make a destination garden, which his Fallbrook, California, property has certainly become. In fact, it is not a formally designed landscape at all. But one look at the garden makes it clear there was a method to Patrick's wonderful madness.
Tour of the Peggy Rockefellar Rose Garden
Tour of the Peggy Rockefellar Rose Garden
Length: 03:20
Gardening for Wildlife
Gardening for Wildlife
Length: 04:29
When people think of a wildlife garden, they often think of a messy tangle of plants tossed together without much forethought, like a thicket of shrubs and trees that might only appear inviting to squirrels and spiders. But a wildlife garden doesn't have to be messy or unwelcoming. It just requires striking the right balance between form and function. When it works, it meets the needs of everyone—human and nonhuman alike—and provides an oasis of beauty. There are lots of good reasons to create a wildlife-friendly garden: • Birds and other creatures eat bugs, providing natural pest control. • Creatures of all kinds are a sign of a healthy ecosystem. • A garden that's a little less refined means lower maintenance. • Increased pollination from bees and birds increases the yield of fruit and vegetables. Take video a tour of a successful wildlife garden with Sara Van Fleet, a passionate gardener and wildlife enthusiast in Vashon, Washington.
Designing Container Groupings
Designing Container Groupings
Length: 03:36
Container groupings are an ideal solution for all kinds of problem areas. Groupings of pots can soften the geometry of a scene or create dramatic entries, hallways, and outdoor rooms. They can also teach you a lot about combining plants because you can move things around until you get it just right. In this video, author Steve Silk explains how he has adapted his thriller, filler, and spiller container recipe to container clusters.
Planting Roses in Containers
Planting Roses in Containers
Length: 02:52
Controlling Weeds
Controlling Weeds
Length: 00:59
Here are the steps you need to take in order to keep weeds at bay: 1. Let sleeping seeds lie. Digging and cultivating brings weed seeds to the surface. 2. Mulch. Don't give weeds the chance to see light. 3. Weed early and often. Young weeds go down easier than older ones. 4. Chop off their heads. If you can't yank 'em out, then deadhead them before they go to seed. 5. Space your plants close together. Planting tightly shades the soil between emerging weeds. You know what this means: you're just going to have to buy more plants. 6. Water your plants, not your weeds. Do we need to explain this one?
Make Your Own Easy Garden Lanterns
Make Your Own Easy Garden Lanterns
Length: 02:56
Watch Michelle Gervais, Fine Gardening's technical editor, demonstrate how to make garden lanterns. Pierced-tin candleholders are easy to create and add a folk-art touch to your garden. Even better, most of the materials can be found in the recycling bin and in a reasonably well-stocked tool shed. Michelle's article "Garden Lanterns" appears in the September/October 2002 issue of Fine Gardening (#87).
Ornaments in the Garden
Ornaments in the Garden
Length: 04:52
"I love to embellish—my clothing, my house, and best of all, my garden," says Eve Thyrum, a volunteer at the Scott Arboretum at Swarthmore College and a member of the Hardy Plant Society. In this tour of her 2-1/4-acre garden, Eve shares some of her ideas for placing ornaments to develop motifs and create a sense of unity in the garden. Eve gardens with her husband, Per, in the verdant hills of Delaware, Pennsylvania. Her article Ornaments in the Garden appears in the November/December 2000 issue of Fine Gardening (#76).
How to Water Beautiful Containers and Gardens
How to Water Beautiful Containers and Gardens
Length: 05:19
Painting Clay Pots
Painting Clay Pots
Length: 03:11
If you love terra-cotta but think too much of it can be monotonous, then check out this video about painting clay pots with Fine Gardening associate editor Michelle Gervais. It's an easy and inexpensive way to dress up the garden as well as a thoughtful way to personalize a plant gift. Michelle's article "Painting Clay Pots" appeared in the July/August 2002 issue of Fine Gardening (#86).
A Dynamic Design for a Garden Passageway
A Dynamic Design for a Garden Passageway
Length: 03:20
When Scott Endres moved into his home 12 years ago, he felt constricted by the amount of space available for gardening. With a small front yard, a tiny backyard, and a narrow side yard, he knew he would have to make the most of every square inch of space. The side garden proved to be the most challenging. He wanted it to be an experience, not just an expressway between the front and the back. He also needed more space for plantings, and wanted to enjoy this space as much as the other areas. So, he broadened the space psychologically and made it into a destination that would guests to linger as they passed from the public to the private areas of his garden. His success relied on wise hardscape decisions, the careful placement of plants and focal points, and the inventive use of repetition to pull it all together.
Make a Straw-Bale Garden
Make a Straw-Bale Garden
Length: 01:57
How to Wrangle a Cactus
How to Wrangle a Cactus
Length: 03:16
If the thought of repotting a cactus makes you break out in a cold sweat, then you'll enjoy this video. Jeff Moore of Solana Succulents in Solana Beach, California, demonstrates how to repot a nasty-looking golden barrel cactus—without wearing protective gear. He also covers some of the basics of cactus care including light requirements, soil texture, and soil drainage.
Root Pruning Container Plants
Root Pruning Container Plants
Length: 06:23
If your container plant is rootbound—or just growing a little too vigorously for your liking—it may be a candidate for a process called root pruning. Watch as Lee Reich, author of Uncommon Fruits for Every Garden, demonstrates his technique.
Potting Soil Recipe for Woody Plants and Perennials
Potting Soil Recipe for Woody Plants and Perennials
Length: 02:49
The Recipe 1 part peat moss 1 part composted bark 1 part compost 1 part sand 1 part perlite If the mix clumps together and the compost you use is heavy, add more perlite to ensure good drainage. Use extra compost or bark when growing more mature plants, but don’t make it too rich for young plants—it could damage their delicate roots and stems.
Potting Soil Recipe for Cacti and Succulents
Potting Soil Recipe for Cacti and Succulents
Length: 01:13
The Recipe 5 parts perlite 4 parts bagged potting soil 1 part coarse sand Pinch of rock dust Top-dress the container soil with small river rock, gravel, aquarium stone, or a fine-grade roofing gravel to keep the crowns of the plants from rotting. To increase acidity just slightly—something all succulents like—add 1 tablespoon white vinegar to 5 gallons water when watering.
Potting Soil Recipe for Annuals
Potting Soil Recipe for Annuals
Length: 02:33
The Recipe 1 part expanded slate 1 part composted chicken manure 1 part worm castings 1 part composted pine bark 1 part coarse river sand Because the worm castings and chicken manure provide enough nutrients to last throughout the season and the pine bark continues to increase fertility as it decomposes, this mix requires little or no extra feeding on your part.
Planting Garden Roses in Containers
Planting Garden Roses in Containers
Length: 02:52
Select a rose that will stay in scale with the container without much heavy pruning. In terms of size, 24 to 36-inch-wide containers are ideal. For durability, lean toward cast stone or molded resin containers. While the popular half-whiskey barrels are a good size, they tend to decompose in wet climates unless they are heavily treated with preservatives. Andrew Schulman, a landscape designer and Fine Gardening author, shows how to plant roses in containers and adds a tip to aid in watering. Related Videos: How to Prune Shrub Roses How to Prune Hybrid Tea Roses How to Prune Floribunda Roses Feeding and Mulching Roses
Painting Clay Pots
Painting Clay Pots
Length: 03:11
If you love terra-cotta but think too much of it can be monotonous, then check out this video about painting clay pots with Fine Gardening associate editor Michelle Gervais. It's an easy and inexpensive way to dress up the garden as well as a thoughtful way to personalize a plant gift. Michelle's article "Painting Clay Pots" appeared in the July/August 2002 issue of Fine Gardening (#86).
How to Grow Potatoes in Containers
How to Grow Potatoes in Containers
Length: 02:13
What's not to love about potatoes? They're tasty, require little maintenance to grow, and even produce pretty flowers. If you have the right container, you don't even need to plant them in the ground. Check out this video on growing potatoes in the most unlikely of places: a kitchen garbage can.
Great Plants Deserve the Perfect Pot
Great Plants Deserve the Perfect Pot
Length: 04:59
It doesn't take long for a visit to the local garden center or greenhouse to become an overwhelming, hair-pulling experience. With dozens of plant and pot choices available, it can be difficult to pick just the right elements for the perfect container planting. In this video, Rita Randolph, of Randolph's Greenhouses, in Jackson, TN, demonstrates how to design a container planting by first selecting plants, and then finding a pot to match.
Designing Container Groupings
Designing Container Groupings
Length: 03:36
Container groupings are an ideal solution for all kinds of problem areas. Groupings of pots can soften the geometry of a scene or create dramatic entries, hallways, and outdoor rooms. They can also teach you a lot about combining plants because you can move things around until you get it just right. In this video, author Steve Silk explains how he has adapted his thriller, filler, and spiller container recipe to container clusters.
A Great Pot Inspires Its Planting
A Great Pot Inspires Its Planting
Length: 04:44
It doesn't take long for a visit at the local garden center or greenhouse to become an overwhelming, hair-pulling experience. With dozens of plant and pot choices available, it can be difficult to pick just the right elements for the perfect container planting. In this video, Rita Randolph, of Randolph's Greenhouses, in Jackson, TN, demonstrates how to design a container planting by first selecting a pretty pot.
A Basic Potting Soil Recipe
A Basic Potting Soil Recipe
Length: 05:06
Lee Reich, Ph.D., author of Uncommon Fruits for Every Garden, works hard to ensure that the soil in his garden is the best he can give his plants. Yet that same good soil if transferred to a container would cause the plants in it to languish. That's because garden soil doesn't offer enough air, water, or nutrients to a plant growing in a container. In this video, Lee creates his own potting soil mix that is specifically formulated to overcome these limitations.
Build a Garden Shed - Introduction
Build a Garden Shed - Introduction
Length: 01:15
Build a Garden Shed - Framing the Floor
Build a Garden Shed - Framing the Floor
Length: 06:39
Build a Garden Shed - Wall Framing
Build a Garden Shed - Wall Framing
Length: 03:47
Build a Garden Shed - Roof Framing
Build a Garden Shed - Roof Framing
Length: 06:46
Build a Garden Shed - Roofing
Build a Garden Shed - Roofing
Length: 05:22
Build a Garden Shed - Windows and Door Furring
Build a Garden Shed - Windows and Door Furring
Length: 05:24
Build a Garden Shed - Lower Trim and Siding
Build a Garden Shed - Lower Trim and Siding
Length: 03:53