Facebook LinkedIn Email Pinterest Twitter Instagram YouTube Icon Navigation Search Icon Main Search Icon Video Play Icon Audio Play Icon Headphones Icon Plus Icon Minus Icon Check Icon Print Icon Note Icon Heart Icon Filled Heart Icon Single Arrow Icon Double Arrow Icon Hamburger Icon TV Icon Close Icon Sorted Hamburger/Search Icon
Garden Photo of the Day

A Malaysian Garden

By Kim Charles

Let's head over to Malaysia!

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica}

We have received a few great photos (unfortunately no story) from Gombak, Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia. Definitely worth a look! It's great to see such a varied and interesting mix of gardens from many regions of our amazing world! Enjoy! 

 

Have a garden you'd like to share? Email 5-10 photos and a brief story about your garden to GPOD@taunton.com. Please include where you are located!

Have a mobile phone? Tag your photos on Instagram or Twitter with #FineGardening!

You don't have to be a professional garden photographer – check out our garden photography tips!

Do you receive the GPOD by email yet? Sign up here.

Follow us: @finegardening on Twitter | FineGardeningMagazine on Facebook @finegardening on Instagram





View Comments

Comments

  1. frankgreenhalgh 11/21/2016

    What an interesting and unusual leaf colouration on the plant in the feature photo! Obviously a tropical plant - anybody know the name?

    1. user-7007498 11/21/2016

      I agree with Diane. Pretty striking color variation. Very cool.

  2. frankgreenhalgh 11/21/2016

    Hey Rhonda - since you indicated last week that you have issues with geography, I have now dumbed down the map of Oz to a simple mud map. Does this help or is it still clear as mud? Cheers, Frank

    1. user-7007498 11/21/2016

      Great photo, Frank. Talk about nationalism. Even the mud puddles have to show Aussie spirit.

      1. frankgreenhalgh 11/21/2016

        Yep Kev. - even includes a mini puddle representing the island of Tasmania. The acid test though, is Rhonda's response since she is challenged by my geography. Had a 100 degree F day today, which came after a long spell of cool spring weather - knocked the hydrangeas around a bit, but everything else weathered the heat fine. Cheers mate

        1. Sheila_Schultz 11/21/2016

          100 degrees? Can't there just be some sort of middle ground when it comes to temps? Ha! I'm pretty surprised your mud-map didn't turn to dust, Frank!

        2. user-7007498 11/21/2016

          100 degrees. Yuk.
          40 degrees here and very windy. Had snow flurries Sat night.

    2. User avater
      meander1 (Michaele ) 11/21/2016

      A smile goes well with my first cup of morning coffee...thanks, Frank.

      1. frankgreenhalgh 11/21/2016

        Hi Michaele - wait until you have your second!

    3. user-4691082 11/21/2016

      Now, Frank, where is Tasmania in that puddle? I also need you to hold a pointer and show me where you live!

      1. user-4691082 11/21/2016

        Sorry, didn't see that response to Kevin before I wrote!

      2. frankgreenhalgh 11/21/2016

        Greetings Rhonda - looks like I still have work to do! Tasmania is just below the right hand bottom corner of the 'mainland'. I live in the State of Victoria (the garden State), which is just above 'Tasmania'. Cheers from Oz

        1. user-4691082 11/21/2016

          To answer your question about any Aussie relatives, there could be. You know when people trace their family roots, they always let you know they are related to famous people...well...my people came over on the boat from England as indentured servants, so they were probably crooks! Seriously, my mothers family is from North Carolina and we are descendants of Edward Teach, a.k.a. Blackbeard the pirate! I'm sure many people are as he was probably a busy guy 😉

          1. frankgreenhalgh 11/21/2016

            Interesting Rhonda - minor criminals in England were sent to Australia as a penalty to establish the first white settlement in 1788 (i.e. penal colony). My great grand father came from England to Aussie land in the 1850's for the gold rush. He had 17 children - he too was a busy guy! Cheers, Frank

    4. wGardens 11/21/2016

      I too, enjoyed your photo, Frank. I am also noticing that there are no (visible) rocks. Is that the case in this area?

      1. frankgreenhalgh 11/21/2016

        Yes Margaret, a lot of our roads/tracks are in sandy areas, especially in our outback. Cheers, Frank

    5. User avater
      Linda on Whidbey 11/21/2016

      Thanks for the laugh this morning, Frank. I don't envy you that 100 degree heat.

      1. frankgreenhalgh 11/21/2016

        Hi Linda - You are such an international jet setter (Hawaii, Europe , Australia etc. etc.)! Good on you - great to travel before you reach your 'golden' years I say. I was helping remove a large gum tree (iron bark) in the heat - my neighbour and I were worried about it falling onto her house - she couldn't sleep during windy nights; pity to lose such a lovely tree, but safety first. Cheers, Frank

  3. frankgreenhalgh 11/21/2016

    Thanks a lot Diane - I just looked up Caladium (elephants ear) and it certainly looks like it. Glad you like the mud puddle. Cheers from Oz

  4. User avater
    meander1 (Michaele ) 11/21/2016

    Looks like some edibles are part of this garden...always a nice treat. Anyone have any ideas of what the plant bearing the cluster is in picture #4?

    1. PerenniallyCrazy 11/22/2016

      I believe photo #4 is Averrhoa bilimbi, more commonly known as bililmbi. It is called "kamias" in the Philippines. My grandfather had one in his backyard and we used to pick the fruits when we were kids. It is typically used as a souring agent for some traditional Philippine dishes. You can also eat the fruit by itself or dipped in salt. It is a sour fruit... and yes, the fruits stem directly from the trunk or branches of the tree. (Photo shared below Sheila's comment.) The leaves are also used for medicinal purposes.

      Hope this satisfies yours and Sheila's curiosity.

      1. User avater
        meander1 (Michaele ) 11/22/2016

        Thanks for all the background info, Cherry. Nice to revisit those special memories from growing up. Sounds you were very much an appreciator of plants even as a child.

  5. wGardens 11/21/2016

    Indeed! Lovely photos! Especially enjoyed the photo of the kitten and caladium.

  6. Chris N 11/21/2016

    Always fascinating to see gardens from around the world.

  7. Sheila_Schultz 11/21/2016

    Can't you just feel the warmth when looking at the photos? Like Michaela, I'm curious about the cluster of fruit (?).

    1. PerenniallyCrazy 11/22/2016

      I've tried to satisfy your curiosity... my answer below Michaele's comment... brings me back to my childhood.

      1. Sheila_Schultz 11/22/2016

        I should have known you would have the answer... so happy you pay attention to GPOD. Hugs ;)

  8. VikkiVA 11/21/2016

    I agree Diane...Caladium. This coloration always reminds me of watermelon. Vikki in VA

  9. VikkiVA 11/21/2016

    Colorful and varied plant selection. The caladium with the kitten is such a sweet picture. So nice to see gardens of the world. Thanks for posting these anonymous pictures Kim. Vikki in VA

  10. User avater
    Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 11/21/2016

    Tropical and lovely. Great Caladium and fig.

  11. User avater
    Linda on Whidbey 11/21/2016

    So nice to see a tropical garden this morning. Last year at this time we were heading to Hawaii for a month and we were just feeling nostalgic about that so this was a welcome sight. Love the Caladium with the kitten. Michaela, maybe that unknown fruit tree is a Pawpaw? Just a guess looking st the leaf. Thanks, Kim, for the international treat.

    1. User avater
      meander1 (Michaele ) 11/21/2016

      Thanks for the guess, Linda. Think I'll go do a google image search and see if it looks like a match.

      1. marilouperham 11/23/2016

        Hi Mike....this tree (3rd picture from the top) with fruit grows in every backyard in the Philippines...here a link https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Averrhoa_bilimbi

        1. User avater
          meander1 (Michaele ) 11/23/2016

          I really enjoyed the wikipedia read about it, Marilou. It certainly found a happy place to grow when it was introduced to the Philippines.

  12. Schatzi 11/21/2016

    Nice pictures, great discussion. Can always count on Frank for a chuckle - or a belly laugh! Ya did good, Frank.

    1. frankgreenhalgh 11/21/2016

      Thanks Shirley - life is too short to be serious all the time!

  13. user-3058938 11/21/2016

    Does this site have smell-o-vision? Sweet tropical scents seem to waft through my computer while looking at today's pictures.

  14. Sheila_Schultz 11/22/2016

    My dear GPOD friends... how wonderful that we can have so many lovely conversations over photos + just chatting without any intro. It is this conversationally comfortable space that Michelle made possible and that Kim is thoughtfully carrying on. I'm loving this.

    1. frankgreenhalgh 11/22/2016

      Nice comments Sheila.

      1. Sheila_Schultz 11/22/2016

        Thanks Frank... I've been with this blog since close to it's beginning. GPOD is a comfortable, welcoming and sassy home for anyone that likes to garden. Perfect.

Log in or create an account to post a comment.

Related Articles

The Latest

Magazine Cover

Take your passion for plants to the next level

Subscribe today and save up to 37%

"As a recently identified gardening nut I have tried all the magazines and this one is head and shoulders above the pack."

Video

View All