Food and drink - Page 2 of 4

  • Article

    Grow Your Own Microgreens

    Since I have been growing microgreens commercially, I have seen their popularity take off. Countless fine restaurants have added them to their menus, and customers have started seeking them out…

  • Kitchen Gardening

    Why Do Greens Bolt?

    No matter what you do, when you grow lettuces and other greens in your garden, they will eventually start growing taller and blooming. Most people assume that it’s just high…

  • Article

    What Makes Cut Flowers Last Longer?

    One of the great joys of gardening is taking beautiful blooms from favorite plants and placing them indoors to brighten a room. Cut flowers, however, can quickly lose their beauty.…

  • Kitchen Gardening

    Beyond the Basic Greens

    Fresh-picked salad greens are among the most rewarding vegetables that a gardener can grow. What else yields tasty baby leaves in just 30 days from a few seeds sown in…

  • Kitchen Gardening

    Regional Picks: Large-Leaved Perennials – Southeast

    1. ‘Pink Wonder’ Hidden Cone Ginger Name: Curcuma ‘Pink Wonder’ USDA hardiness zones: 7b to 10 Size: 7 feet tall and 2 feet wide Conditions: Partial to light shade; well-drained…

  • How-To

    Get to Know the Truth Behind Common Canning Myths

    Eating seasonally is a way of life for many people, especially gardeners, but it can be a challenge because a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables are not available year-round.…

  • How-To

    Rejuvenate Your Strawberry Patch

    There is nothing quite like a warm strawberry picked ripe from your own garden, but not everyone has success with strawberry plants every year. Sure, plunking a strawberry plant in…

  • Kitchen Gardening

    Squash Basics: Troubleshooting Common Squash Problems

    Green zucchini, yellow crooknecks, and pattypans—all summer squash are tasty, early bearing, and easy to grow, especially if you use good organic methods. But with even the best of crops,…

  • How-To

    How to Grow Cucumbers

    Good riddance to the cucumbers of a few decades ago—those fat, green, spiny, tough-skinned, and acid-producing fruit that were once served with iceberg lettuce and bottled dressing. Today’s cucumber is…

  • Kitchen Gardening

    Had Trouble With Your Beans?

    Although no one knows for sure who the first person was to start eating the immature succulent pods of legumes, it was likely some worker sweating away in a field…