tntreeman

jeff calton, TN, US
member


plant geek all my life, started "in the business" at age 4 by taking the neighbors flowers after she went to work, potting them in dixie cups then selling them back to her every evening. degreed in 1981 self employed since 1986 , garden design/install/maintain. love meeting/interacting with other gardeners and plant people

Gender: Male

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Contributions

my coolest plant of 2013

new plant this year and after it FINALLY started to grow it outperformed it's description, amazing translucent thorns especially when backlit by a setting sun

las vegas baby

we are calling her "Cher"

peruvian daffodill?

is this Peruvian daffodill? Hymenocallis? was given to me years ago and i've always called them billie lilies as that was the giver's name. i have been told many different possibilities for this...

what is this orchid variety

i was given this orchid several years ago and it flowers reliably each spring but i have no idea as to it's variety,,,,can anyone identify or send me in the right direction to identify?



Recent comments


Re: Spring in Irvin & Pauline's garden in California

i always love this garden. the plant selections, the commentary and the story of it's development. i love it all everytime and will check out the page when i have more time. AND the umbrella skeleton is fun!

Re: Summer scenes from Carla's garden in Connecticut

Carla, your place is always snazzy. great colors, plants, combos all of it. hands down my favorite photo is the one of the mailbox legs :) i love that one!

Re: The garden Nina left behind

what a great week with Nina both in Montana and California. i would think moving from CA to zone 4 would be like starting from scratch and not only with an unplanted garden,,,,,,,,,learning all those new plants and what will perform. at least it would be for me. enjoyed it all, Nina, hats off to both you and Bud

Re: Nina's dry stream bed in Montana

one more look before i head out, Nina,,,,,,,,,,,you rock

Re: Nina's dry stream bed in Montana

that weed cloth has caused me more frustration and bad language than anything i have ever encountered in a landscape. if we start a project that already has it,,,,first thing remove ALL weed cloth

Re: Nina's dry stream bed in Montana

Nina, all i can possibly say is that i like/love everything about your home and garden. it's ALL just super in every way

Re: Nina's garden in Montana, Day 2

Nina, it's as i expected it would be, snazzy! everything is just perfect

Re: Nina's garden in Montana, Day 1

i woke up today to an ice storm warning and an Inbox of messages saying "look at gpod" i'm glad i did. Nina, i love this place / the big sky, the mountain view, the rhubarb that looks like Gunnera! favorite is the view of the vegetable garden, looking forward to the rest of the week

Re: Marmalade and Jello

JamesAS i would be happy to give you my address just so i could receive some marmalade. i do want to be in line before the supply runs out!

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

bee1nine, if you want to correspond/share garden miseries and triumphs and tips ask michelle for my email. i posted it publicly here once, BAD IDEA

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

bee1nine, we ALL need sympathy sometimes. only another gardener feels the same anguish and utter frustration of these things. i was awakened this morning by thunder, lightening and HAIL along with tornado warnings. spring is starting her games early. and yes, i'll keep razzing you about it, it's good to share despite the risks.
facebook me if you do that. it has become yet another addiction here this winter

Re: Color in Daniela's garden in Ohio

nice surprise to see Daniela's garden here this morning. your garden always provides masses of color and a changing face. good to see you here, i've missed your comments and photos

Re: please help identify this tree/shrub??

kind of looks like an avocado to me but NOT sure at all

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

bee1nine we have damage here as well from this brutal winter and i will be working at darryl's tomorrow. he and his sons planted most of the things you see in the photos. i'm glad you liked his property and trust, as a fellow gardener i feel your pain. nature can deal us some heavy blows but we always recover. i shared his garden because it is lush, colorful and after a LONG winter i know i enjoy seeing thriving gardens. this is a great group of people on this blog and i have become friends with several outside of this forum and have learned MUCH from everyone here. i always look forward to your comments, bee, but tell me,,,,,,,,,,,where is your garden?!?!?! :) just razzing you on that one. thanks for everybody's comments and i'm pleased you liked darryl's garden and hope you got some ideas for your own garden. make it a great week and know that your garden will spring back with vigor when winter finally leaves

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

i never really thought of it as an estate, it was always "darryl's house". glad everybody liked it and darryl is gonna be a happy guy!

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

May, this garden is LIVED in so having it pristine and not a petal out of place is not an option. it just won't happen but it is alive and enjoyed . isn'tit great to see a house or garden with personal things and to know it's actually used and enjoyed? and btw, where is Granny CC?

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

thanks, Yeddi, it really is a very nice property. i'm lucky to have great clients with great spaces in which to work. all of them are good people and would welcome you to their garden with open arms and probably an iced tea!

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

HelloFromMd, we start containers end of this month with cold tolerant things,,,,,,,,lettuce of different colors, chard (City Lights), pansies, erica and even onions and cabbage, they last until it's time to switch out then we EAT THEM!
so many colocasia to choose from nowadays, i always like Antiquorum illustris and Kona Koffee for drama. they all go crazy in the heat/humidity when many other things suffer. michelle posted a few containers from last year in a previous post if you want to look at them there. i'll be neck deep in tropicals in 2 more months.

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

tractor1 there is NO grass in the western areas of the property, it is all planted/mulched and not that large of an area. there is lawn in the front of the house and all the way to the entry gates on either side of the drive. itis not claustrophobic at all, the house sits on top of a hill with views down the valley and of Bays Mountain that stretches well into Greene County. there is probably 2 acres gardened with surrounding acreage of woodland. everybody has different tastes in gardening or planting and i'm thankful for that

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

greenthumblonde, in sarasota plant some Cestrum nocturnum, it's rampant and might be invasive there , here i use as an annual but man it's so intoxicating at night that it's worth the rampant growth. again, it might be a problem in sarasota

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

greenthumblonde, so far winter does the trimming for us on the jasmine, i just take off the frozen areas, it survives there ONLY because it's very protected and some winters takes a real beating,,,this being one of those winters. i'm glad Darryl's garden got you all fired up!

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

wGardens, i was not involved from the beginning i have only been there maybe 5 years. the truth, the first visit i was overwhelmed and wanted to run away. things were more than alittle out of hand and i thought to myself, we willNEVER get this back inorder but 3 people and 4 days andit was under control and hasn't been a big problem since. it did, however, give Darryl more room for additional plants :( at this point i tell him he needs a shoehorn to get anymore planted. i think the house was built maybe 15 years ago buti'm not sure. maybe Darryl will chime in and letus know

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

Sculpturedale, i was there yesterday and will work there tomorrow (my winter lazies are over) surprisingly everything made it pretty well. freezeback of the loropetalum but it will come back, some hydrangea damage and dead twiggy stuff in the roses but all in all it seems to be ok. gardenias are all toast, i'm concerned about the crape myrtle around town freezing back to ground level but the camellias sailed right thru!

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

NCYarden, i'm GLAD to get the variety name. i doubt i'll ever recall it and sure the tag is now gone. i need to keep better records. Mike, i'm not sure of the entertainment schedule, i do know that when the boys were still at home there was A LOT of activity there. sure the teenagers didn't appreciate the garden so much but they were very respectful of it

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

PADesigner, we are very small and i am very lucky to have a GREAT client list and they pretty much let me do what i want. this garden, however, truly is Darryl's vision. we plant a lot, we groom a lot but he takes his garden seriously and i'm fortunate to be a part of it. i never take more than 2 other people with me to this property. i don't want any mishaps and it's easy to "lose" your help at this location.

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

pattyspencer, those are roses. there is an iron "trellis" support along the roofline for support

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

mainer59, the bees flock to the wells in summer as do butterflies but always at different times, i guess theyshare the bounty. we have a carved stone basin at an old restoration property that was almost discarded and lost in the work but we were able to rescue it and put itback in place in the veggie/herb garden. bees have so many problems we need to give them all the help we can

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

wGardens, that plant with the fine green leaves is a Japanese maple, potted. i can't think of the variety but it will come to me eventually!

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

greengenes, we always trim boxwood the 3rd week of march (ok, sometimes the final week) the new growth begins mid april so it doesn't look like a fresh haircut, groomed but not stiff. if anything gets unruly we trim selectively then in fall just a bit off the top to keep in line

Re: Darryl's garden in Tennessee, from Jeff, Day 2

Diane, we actually spend less time here than we do other properties but there are seasonal things that require more time. i think you probably could grow some varieties of Sarracenia,,, some are very hardy as i understand it. trimming of the boxwood can be interesting, one guy has to hold up adjacent growth with a rake handle while i trim. onceyou get your patternsand scheduling down it's not so bad. i didn't get any photos of the vegetables or the lower hidden terrace.. ..maybe this summer

Re: Darryl's Garden in Tennessee, from Jeff

quinquek that evergreen is a large weeping norway spruce. it was beginning to overwhelm the spot so was limbed up

Re: Darryl's Garden in Tennessee, from Jeff

CJGardens Old Gold is more compact with congested growth you won't ever get the same color or the foxtail look of the branches i MUCH prefer Saybrook Gold . that is not a hedge of roses but it is a row of climbing roses along the top of an iron fence. it's all along the driveway. and wGardens,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,come on down! i could use the help

Re: Darryl's Garden in Tennessee, from Jeff

Aarchman we have 32 properties to maintain all nice but this one is way different from the others. once you get to know the clients it's not that hard to do things to their liking. it's the containers that drive me crazy in spring. some of the properties are larger but many are smaller but we try to keep each one as nicely gardened as we can.
Meelianthus most of that lavender will have to be replanted this spring. 2013 was an unusually WET summer and much of it just rotted away,,,,,,,,it's always somethin'. i think tomorrow is the back "yard" and i hope nobody is disappointed

Re: Darryl's Garden in Tennessee, from Jeff

wGardens you will love Saybrook gold . Junipers as a lot take a bad rap but there are many good ones out there and if you keep the hedge shears away from them they are excellent performers and give a lot of color year round.

Re: Darryl's Garden in Tennessee, from Jeff

May, there is no disgrace to having a bit of help,,,,,,,,,,,,,,my livelihood kind of depends on that!
those climbing roses on the house and all the fences, there are many more in the back areas are a bear to maintain, BIG thorns and climbing up and down a ladder. by days end i looke like a life size bloody crucifix

Re: Darryl's Garden in Tennessee, from Jeff

tractor1, Darryl is a collector of japanese maples and there are many there both in ground and potted as well as Stewartia, Musclewood and many other plants not so often seen here. and bees bees bees and more bees . he has a glass hive inside the house with an opening thru the wall to the outside and of course, fountains and other bubblers around to provide water for the bees and butterflies. hummingbirds can and do divebomb you there

Re: Darryl's Garden in Tennessee, from Jeff

pattyspencer, here both sweet autumn clematis and akebia are thugs. one OLD property we are renovating had one section covered in akebia, when removed we discovered a boxwood knot garden

Re: Darryl's Garden in Tennessee, from Jeff

Mike, that is a mix of vines and it kind of drives me nuts. there is Akebia in there as well as some clematis and the birds have graciously planted virginia creeper. i think there is even some sweet autumn clematis in there too
vines=high maintenance in my opinion

Re: Darryl's Garden in Tennessee, from Jeff

Diane, container originality is HARD. digital photography helps tremendously. when doing SO many in a really short time and in a small town where everybody knows everybody it's very difficult to keep things fresh, different and new.i don't envy the mowing crews especially in a wet year. other maintenance chores you can juggle and shift around but mowing has to be on time every week no matter what. i'm crazy enough as it is without that added pressure

Re: Darryl's Garden in Tennessee, from Jeff

flowerladydi, we do not mow lawns/i have difficulty even keeping mine cut and trimmed we only plant and/or maintain ornamental plantings and seasonal color change outs, will start doing containers end of this month. we are there probably once a month or more often if needed. other properties we visit each 2 weeks and a few we go weekly. this years city garden tour has 2 of our properties included so we're gonna be hopping. i have fall photos somewhere but i have flooded Michelle with photos over the year , she needs a reprieve!

Re: Identify these plants please

the first one perhaps canna? or a struggling banana
second, not sure but the dark green resembles chives, just a guess
third,,,,,,gloxinia?
4th is a variegated Juniper
last is definitely Asparagus fern

Re: Our favorite garden at the Northwest Flower & Garden Show

these garden show displays always amaze me and i would be hard pressed to pick a favorite if i had been on a judging team. it's hard to create a space like that in the real world but to create it with only 1 or 2 days of time is incredibly difficult and then to be seen by tens of thousands,,,,,,,,stress overload. i feel as if i know many of the gpod people from having coffee each morning with them here but to meet in person would be so much fun amazing group of people.
BTW, i am President of the PerenniallyCrazy fan club, contact me for information about joining.

Re: Midge's garden in Pennsylvania

thanks, Midge, now that i look more closely i see the wall, first glance it looked BIG, my coffee had not kicked in i guess

Re: Midge's garden in Pennsylvania

Midge, did you train the hemlock to get more height? or just let it do it's thing? i have 3 cole's prostrate here for over 20 years but they are maybe 6" tall at most but spread out about 4 ft. just curious

Re: Midge's garden in Pennsylvania

now THIS is truly a treat this morning with everything white outside. not sure where to begin... the scarecrow i want, the pond / i want, i really do love this entire place. the foxes are a real treat, i haven't seen a fox here since the coyotes moved in some years back. your experiments in your own garden are a real success!

Re: Linda's Recycled Garden in North Dakota

Linda, i'm weathered in and came back to look at your photos. thanks for answering the lilac question. i like reading your text, it's as if you are talking just to me! we really need a pic of you with the rocks in the sled and if you're neighbors don't think you are nuts yet,,,,,,,,,,well you need to try harder!
have fun!!!

Re: Linda's Recycled Garden in North Dakota

Linda, what variety of Lilac are those? borers are a BIG problem with them here so we use Miss Kim and the like but the old fashioned ones are so much more fragrant

Re: Linda's Recycled Garden in North Dakota

another great space showing hard work, ingenuity and using whatis at hand to create what we want. i'm a fan of the limbed up evergreens too/ many people are afraid to do that so i'm glad to see you are fearless! they have legs and they know how to use them. i like that checkerboard a lot too and a dog in the garden,,,,,,,,always a good thing

Re: Scenes from the Northwest Flower & Garden Show

May, i just looked at your photos and with these along with the ones PerenniallyCrazy (she really is crazy :) shared with me i feel almost as if i attended the show myself

Re: Scenes from the Northwest Flower & Garden Show

i did not expect to see the PNW show on here so quick, you're good! now..............what is a GPOD eyeball?

Re: Snail Tree?

the "tree" part looks like some sort of Pachypodium variety.
they are beautiful container plantings

Re: Martha's garden in Michigan

sheila,,,,,,,,,,,god grant us patience,,,,,,,,,,,,and we want it NOW

Re: Martha's garden in Michigan

i like that trellis A LOT too , favorite photo is the one with the flat of plants in the bed waiting to be planted, work in progress of a real gardener :)

Re: Martha's garden in Michigan

yet another beautiful garden in Michigan, i never knew there were so many! i'm right there with you on the age and hand thing and yet we still soldier on. also hats off for the starting from seed, i've never mastered the patience and skill for that . great garden you have, Martha

Re: An ice storm in Jane's garden in Maine

Beth, Jane enticed me with her lines so i couldn't resist trying myself. now it's your turn

Re: An ice storm in Jane's garden in Maine

JaneEliz,,,,,,,,,,,,,thanku

Re: An ice storm in Jane's garden in Maine

white frozen icy
beautiful lovely but cold
spring is under snow

Re: An ice storm in Jane's garden in Maine

i do love going to Jane's house! it is always a treat and today is no different. Jane you see things in your garden that i would have missed so thanks for bringing them to my attention. i did have to google YAKS to know that you didn't have livestock!

Re: Sally's garden in Maryland, in winter

beautiful as always! a true 4 season garden and i love it all. i like Natchez Crape myrtle more in winter than i do when in flower there is nothing quite like their bark display but i love the paper bark maples too! i'm feeling a lot of pent up garden fever on this site lately :)

Re: First Lay your Hedge....

i had no idea the planting of a hedgerow was so involved! and cutting the notches like that just looks painful :)

Re: More from John's butterfly (and hummingbird) garden in Michigan

May, he not only opened the door he GAVE US THE KEY, how cool is that?!?!?!?

Re: More from John's butterfly (and hummingbird) garden in Michigan

Quiltingmamma, watch out for that volcano! will you be in cuenca or vilcabamba?

Re: More from John's butterfly (and hummingbird) garden in Michigan

meander1 you are so right about those photos. you see one and think nothing could be better then the next one is just as good or better! my favorites ,,,,,,,,the hummer shaking pollen off itself and the little girl with the butterfly on her hand. the past two days here have been wonderful and i'm grateful to have gotten time to spend with John and his garden. i'm just totally blown away by everything!

Re: More from John's butterfly (and hummingbird) garden in Michigan

John, i couldn't wait to get up today to see moreof your photos and it was another treat for the senses. i just went back to yesterdays and i'm glad i did. i, like May, visited your flickr link and was totally blown away, each photo better than the one before. you should make a calendar! its' as if your flowers , butterflies and hummingbirds are going to fly right off the screen. i am SO glad you chose to share these visions here on GPOD

Re: my Stream

Ramon, i am so glad to have found this in the gallery and on the FG timeline,,,,,,almost 3,000 thumbs up there!

Re: John's butterfly garden in Michigan

John, out of all the features here on this blog today has been my all time favorite. the photos, the story behind the garden and your exuberance in sharing it. this has been a REAL bright spot during these gray days of winter.your garden is truly beautiful, serves a great purpose for those around you AND the butterflies and you're just such a nice guy too BUT i really want one of those signs in my yard! i wish/hope Michelle got these in time for her presentation because i know it would be a real hit in Seattle

Re: John's butterfly garden in Michigan

John, i don't know what i enjoyed more today, your photos or your commentary. i love someone who is "fired up" and passionate about their garden and you with your butterflies.
and i agree that it would be really cool to have that sign!
such a great job you have done and in such a short time

Re: John's butterfly garden in Michigan

all that since 2012???!?! i'm in awe.
spreadsheets, Excel, variables :( i usually at home just dig and plant and point and shoot for photos. John, should you ever be in east tennessee, please call me, i need help!

Re: John's butterfly garden in Michigan

this is great! i was just reading this weekend about the very LOW numbers of monarchs over wintering in mexico and how everyone should plant as much as they can to help the butterflies. This just makes my day to see this, it's not only beneficial but beautiful as well. i'm with Cherry, my hat is off to you!

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

that clinches the deal, GPOD convention at Darlene's! she always has the best beer

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

oh, lilyday, my garden won't be in the magazine that is going to be tim vojt and annek, i don't really have a garden i just have too many plants! with NO rhyme or reason to their placement :) but thanks!

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

May you deserve a gift for being the 100th visitor!

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

AnneK, not sure i would want to chase Mike for that never before seen daylily, i hear she takes NO prisoners

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

my question, Mike, did you have to click the heels of those snazzy red shoes to get home with the plants? :)

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

Mike, my horticultural horror story is ICE. throughout the night i would hear muffled thumps, we had maybe 6 inches of snow but i never got up to see about it. the next morning when i went to the kitchen i was greeted with my entire backlawn covered in not branches but entire limbs the size of trees throught the back acre and through the roof of the garage. everything was coated in at least 1/2" of ice, all shrubs and small trees were bent/twisted/frozen into contorted shapes and i couldn't do anything except wait for it to melt. talk about a BIG clean up job and a lot of corrective pruning. snow i can deal with but ice storms are life threatening to everything

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

"A Coonhound in Connecticut",,,,,,,sounds like a new Disney movie! glad you gave her a home, Carla.
and Darlene,,a keg of Newcastle in the snow! what a girl!!!

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

ugh, i'm barely awake:) Cherry Ong needled me to come back and check your comment, Mike :)
i like Peyton Manning as well.

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

ok, you have all convinced me that snow is beautiful and ice is good!

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

wGardens you are always fun, i'll wait and have that drink with YOU

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

Beth, i suppose i would adapt,,,,,,,,,,,,,,eventually but i'm not ready to head north just yet

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

Melianthus, we had one night of -8 without much snow so i don't really know what to expect and won't know the full exent until april i suppose. we RARELY get that cold and i don't remember it ever being this prolonged, it will be 55 tomorrow tho!

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

Satisfaction, if we got that much snow every building here would collapse and Atlanta would just have to be erased from the map

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

carla, what kind of dog? and where in tennessee? so many dogs out there need adoption and a friend of mine adopted one from jamaica! a jamaican pie something or other. i couldn't believe it but it at least it has a home. i can feel everybody's frustration with winter and anticipation for spring. i, too, feel as if i know many of you and sure should we meet it would be like we just saw each other the day before BUT i have a big mouth so talking is never really a problem

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

nina, it's only about 2.5 inches mostly all gone now. wish i could send some rainfall to you and to california, my friends there are stocking up on baby wipes so they can cut back on showers and have a little extra to water plants!

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

i'm just going to call you Tim, i can't do all those underscores,,,,i'm a lazy typist

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

i did not notice the gpod connection, will read all tonight. it's like American Idol on here!

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

Mciandella, i do make out wish lists in winter, LONG lists, then i let it rest and edit before i hit checkout. those are actually bald cypress in the background but i do have a dawn redwood and a coast redwood in the western border planting.

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

it's the whole "hat hair" thing, isn't it

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

Michelle, put on that hat! it might be a heatwave but you still need to be stylish :)

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

janetsfolly, if you won't take the citrus, i have a deal for you on some coconut palms :) 2 for 1

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

hummergirl, i only have 2 Agave outside that have survived for years but i don't know about now. A. parryi and A. havardiana, it's not the cold that gets the more hardy varieties it's the wet. maybe it's crazy to even try them but i usually try everything once or maybe even 3 times. Vojt has some in Ohio. tip: wear saftey glasses and thick gloves when working with them, those spines are incredibly pointy and rigid they go right to the bone or rip like a sharkbite danger garden blog usually lists many more hardy varieties

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

red wine, tequila, whiskey, harley riding gardeners should Michelle ever organize a gpod convention i think the authorities should be alerted beforehand

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

Regina, good to see you back and to know that you are still SASSY!

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

Michaele, misery loves company and company usually loves Tennessee whiskey :)

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

a chicken with a capon :) you are punny
AND where have you been ?!?!?!

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

gloriaj, get well soon! and enjoy your time in CA with your sons just don't get any wild ideas about growing those california plants that dazzle in your Ohio garden! i'm a little concerned about my figs too. sure they froze back to ground level but i'm hoping for regrowth from the roots. take care and get that garden planned!!!

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

i just noticed that Elmo is eyeing that bottle with a gleam in his eye!

Re: Jeff needs some cheering up....

Cherry, you cheer me up everytime we talk.
and that WAS the entire lemon crop, 2,,,,,,,,,,,i think Sunkist is safe for now

Re: Kathy's garden in Mississippi

ancientgardener you are just TOO cool! i didn't know you were a "biker chick" :) :) there are so many interesting people on this blog

Re: Kathy's garden in Mississippi

nice garden on the gulf coast! where did you find rocks in biloxi!?!?!? lush growth and the stump has spanish moss curls. i would imagine you ride more / garden less during july/august/september!
and gloriaj, i did not know you were a southern belle

Re: Darlene's garden in South Dakota

what a great wakeup. i love this urban farmstead and what a great example for the entire community. this entire property puts a BIG smile on my face

Re: Barbara's garden in Connecticut, in praise of Angelica gigas

anxiety, no excitement with yet another possibility, yes

Re: Barbara's garden in Connecticut, in praise of Angelica gigas

may, i am crazy, i saw your comment Angelica Barbara and did a google search thinking it was yet another variety. i'm slow but i eventually come up to speed

Re: Barbara's garden in Connecticut, in praise of Angelica gigas

carla if you're going to implement a vision you might as well make it groovy :)

Re: Barbara's garden in Connecticut, in praise of Angelica gigas

carla, underplant with some mexican feather grass or Muhly grass too!

Re: Identify the indor plant

asparagus setaceus

Re: Barbara's garden in Connecticut, in praise of Angelica gigas

i have seen this plant at least twice recently here on gpod but have never seen it grown here in Tennessee, that might have to change this year! if i stopped by Sculpturedale for seeds i would also have to leave with that giraffe

Re: Michelle's garden in Connecticut: before, during, and after

lottsa work! and yes those stones are BIG but oh so nice once they are in place. i'm still intrigued with the dutchmans pipe but can't find anywhere here to plant one

Re: Carolyn's BIG rock garden in Massachusetts

223 thumbs up! you're a "rock" star! corny , i know but somebody had to say it :)

Re: Carolyn's BIG rock garden in Massachusetts

give Vojt a BIG BIG rock and he's a happy camper! :)

Re: Carolyn's BIG rock garden in Massachusetts

you dug and dug for 3 years and you found a buried treasure. it's a real beaut. we have had a few lemons to lemonade features here lately. i am also most interested in your copper sculptures ,,,,,,,,send in pics of those too!

Re: Connie's garden in Illinois

connie i'm with you about children in the garden and they do remember and they do come back to it! gotta get them while they are young. i love planting vegetables with children and seeing their faces when they get to eat that first strawberry that they grew and they ALL love to water the plants. they will remember your garden for always i think

Re: Connie's garden in Illinois

abundantly full and over flowing,,,,just how i like it! and i always like seeing features that draw in children, they do remember. the fairy garden does just that and i'm sure the koi/ up close and personal/ is another irrestible feature. beautiful back garden and how many "kodak moments" have been snapped back there?

Re: Marsha's garden in Illinois

i can't grow it at home either, Sheila , but it seems to thrive in clients gardens. maybe i take more care with it when i'm paid to!

Re: Marsha's garden in Illinois

all beautiful and HEALTHY! my favorite , too, is the photo of the forest grass. something about those fresh greens/yellows that perk me up. good luck with the transition from the high canopy of the locust into a brave new world.

Re: Mystery Houseplant

Pilea cadierei,,,,,,,,,,,,i think. you can google and compare and probably learn more about it than you ever wanted to know! aluminum plant

Re: David's veggie, fruit, and herb garden in Hawaii

my first look at a Hawaii garden that isn't the tropical wonders we are familiar with. i like it a lot and i'm happy to see food/herb production in a state that can grow so much but that i've seen so little of. thanks!

Re: More from Lynn's garden in Wisconsin!

lynn, i'm rolling here. i would never snag anyones plants but i do trade a lot.

Re: More from Lynn's garden in Wisconsin!

Lynn, thanks for the welcome ! however, if any of your Martagon lilies go missing,,,,,,,,,,,,well, "i don't know nothin about nothin" :)

Re: More from Lynn's garden in Wisconsin!

lynn, i have said the same thing: "the last garden spot" but we all know it's not true. i will look forward to photos of your NEXT garden spot! :) i wish i could visit along with Carol Jean

Re: More from Lynn's garden in Wisconsin!

lynn, i keep looking at these photos along with tuesdays and you have made a convert out of me. i've never been too flowery but your place is like stepping through the looking glass. total wonderland

Re: More from Lynn's garden in Wisconsin!

well, tuesday was super and today is spectacular! i can't begin to imagine all the work and dedication with this garden but what wonderful results and satisfaction. absolutely beautiful.

Re: Revisiting Alyson's garden in Washington state

jeanne, i've been getting up early for so long that now i AM a clock! i didn't know until this morning that you're "in the business" too

Re: Revisiting Alyson's garden in Washington state

another great space in the PNW, full/luxuriant and bountiful. a GREAT garden for the grandchildren to explore not sure i could catch a 2 y/o who is determined to run down that path! also checked your previous feature which was before my gpod addiction, beautiful as well. photo updates are always nice to compare the growth and personality changes in the garden.

Re: Lynn's garden in Wisconsin

lynn, from the looks of your amazing hosta collection you must be doing something right concerning voles. it's a never ending battle here and i'm almost always on the losing side

Re: Lynn's garden in Wisconsin

hosta heaven! it's all beautiful but i'm most amazed that each and every hosta leaf is absolute perfection. are there no voles, slugs or deer in wisconsin? this is a beautiful mid summer garden

Re: A restored sunken garden in Illinois

i do love seeing the efforts of people to save,restore and give back to the community something from the past. i'm sure this has been no easy task and the results are beautiful.

Re: Please identify plant, !! my mom brought it from a hilly place from 5 6 years ago.

looks a lot like Vinca major to me, does it have purple flowers?

Re: More from Jeanne's garden in Washington

jeanne, i suggested the water bath and alcohol because i sort of assumed the trees were/are small and i didn't know if she ate the fruit and i'm always uneasy about using chemicals on food stuff or in the house.
still raining here! slow and steady

Re: More from Jeanne's garden in Washington

Jeanne, thanks for not taking offense at my discussion with Irina concerning spider mites. I knew you wouldn't when we started because gardeners are 9 times out of 10 always friendly, warm and willing to help and share experiences with everybody. i'm back again this morning to enjoy your garden photos on a very very rainy morning but at least it's warm here!

Re: Help with flowering plant!

Kalanchoe tubiflora? ifthat's what it is you will be gifted with a GREAT floral display

Re: More from Jeanne's garden in Washington

i would probably cut off the remaining leaves , spray off all branches with a forcefull blast of water, let dry , then mist with rubbing alcohol. i don't know if that's the recommended method but it's always worked for me.
sorry Jeanne for "butting in" but we wanted to save this orange tree!
where are you irina?

Re: More from Jeanne's garden in Washington

irina, hold a sheet of white paper underthe remaining leaves, tap them sharply then look at the white paper. if you see tiny pinpoint spots moving about, not pin head but pinpoint,,, those are the mites. they don't eat leaves, they are on the undersides of the leaves and very small. the leaves can have an "off color" and sometimes a grayish look. i have a Citrus/ Pink Lemonade doing the same thing , i blame it on low humidity inside my house

Re: More from Jeanne's garden in Washington

irina, have you checked it for spider mites?

Re: More from Jeanne's garden in Washington

jeanne, what is the green clump under the wisteria, i can't quite make it out and "in front of our house on a peaceful morning" what is the silver/almost white plant in front of what i think is a Phormium

Re: More from Jeanne's garden in Washington

meander1, the tri color beech does well here for me but man is it slow! i have had some scorch in hot/dry summers so afternoon shade might not be a bad thing and watch out for those borers. i'm envious of all of Jeanne's garden

Re: More from Jeanne's garden in Washington

as always just GREAT. all the plants i love and many that i want but can't have here. envy your wisteria but i'm just too slow (or lazy) to keep up with it. the gunnera is impressive but i fear mine probably died this past monday night even with lots of protection

Re: More from Barbara's garden in Alaska

absolutely breathtaking. i will never think of Alaska and snow/ice at the same time again and i'm blue with envy over those poppies. love all the photos but favorite is the rainbow shot.

Re: Petra's visit to Desert Botanical Garden in Arizona

i'm beginning to wake up and all 3 brain cells are working. i think the Arkansas gardener's name was Sue

Re: Petra's visit to Desert Botanical Garden in Arizona

i do love to visit this garden and on this COLD COLD COLD morning i loved seeing the photos even more. it took me a minute to "find" the Chihuly sculptures in the first photo as i thought they were tall columnar yucca. yes, it's early. i thought Arkansas was featured awhile back but i can't find it. a garden with lots of stone borders and a beautiful vegetable garden but it is early and i am cold so who knows. i especially like the Boojum trees. not sure if it's the plant i like so much or the name or the way they look on a full moon desert night.

Re: Jayne's getaway garden in New Hampshire

my problem would be that i would never getaway from the getaway! beautiful spot and with plantings that perform and give color with a minimum of work so you can actually enjoy your paradise

Re: Vicki's garden in Washington

now that is alotta work for 2.5 years and it's coming together beautifully. the seating areas throughout are especially nice and most likely well used and the greenhouse is just perfect. how much "cussin" went on during that project? :) i'm spying many great plants that have been used too, is that Dystilium in the 4th photo? i have only started using that in the last 5 years and last night might have been it's ultimate test

Re: Desiree's garden in Texas

nice nice nice, i always enjoy roses in others gardens. humidity and my laziness gives me no success with them here. having spent time in San Angelo i give you a big congratulations on your place, i don't know how anything survives those summers. i , too, like photos of the gardeners. i always create a mental image of the gardeners featured but i'm NEVER right when i do see their face. great job, Desiree and thanks

Re: A maypop invasion!

i don't think i have ever seen a native passionflower available for sale or i haven't noticed one. it's always the tropical ones i see .
kershawgirl, here in east tennessee what we call huckleberries are like very small blueberries

Re: A maypop invasion!

P.S. watch out for that Vinca major in the pot on the right hand side of the photo. they escape and can quickly take over entire beds

Re: A maypop invasion!

this same thing almost happened to me. planted one and it was more vigorous that kudzu. i'm still digging out plants several years later. very cool flowers though but i'll enjoy them in the wild rather than my yard from now on

Re: Merry Christmas!

beautiful snowy/christmasy photos. we don't get those views reliably here. thanks to everyone for sharing their garden photos and tips here on GPOD and a special thanks to JonMoss,,,,,,,,,,,,i'll have that song from the video stuck in my head ALL day! merry christmas

Re: Stella's garden on Vancouver Island, Day 2

stella, it's all just absolutely breathtaking and hard to believe it's 3/4 acre. altho, the photos are beautiful , this is another garden i want to get lost in and discover stuff. have the coffee ready..........May and I will be right over for a walkabout.

Re: Stella's garden on Vancouver Island, Day 1

May, maybe i'll give that Arbutus a try next year. it says Zone 7 and i am 6b/ 7a. stella, do they handle heat and humidity ?

Re: Tomato Cage Christmas Tree

snazzy! i've never done that with a tomato cage but this year we did make some outdoor christmas trees out of coiled rusted barb wire for a client at a log house/farm ranch that turned out pretty well

Re: Stella's garden on Vancouver Island, Day 1

things i have learned from GPOD:
1. every square inch of Vancouver Island is beautiful
2. if i am to have a Gunnera look like that i will have to immigrate
3. i would probably kill, maim or take hostages to have that beautiful cinnamon barked Arbutus
everything is just spectacular, Stella, and for someone who has very little soil you have succeeded in a most beautiful way, i will be anxious for tomorrow's photos

Re: Fall in Nancy's Maryland garden

i'm like you gloriaj, i spent a lot of time examining nancy's photos closely. she has some great plants and combos. AND you're welcome in Tennessee anytime, i think hugs and laughter are VERY important in this life and most people don't get enough of either one.

Re: Fall in Nancy's Maryland garden

twas the friday before Christmas
and all thru this blog
everyone was scrolling
with eyes all agog

AnneK with her horses
and Meander with grass
and Sheila with agaves
always sticking her a$$

tim with his rocks
all scattered about
plants here and plants there
his garden has clout

and Michelle at attention
with gavel in hand
saying BE NICE everybody
this is MY gardenland!!!

hope it's the best christmas ever and keep up the great work, Nancy, i'll be waiting for summer photos of your place!

Re: Fall in Nancy's Maryland garden

nancy, it all looks great and i covet your Spiranthes. i haven't mastered growing that and Rabdosia is a new one for me to try. i also really like that mum,,,,,Rumba. your garden is chock full of choice plants and it all looks smashing. love it all
i do want to also extend a merry christmas wish to everyone here at GPOD, you really have become coffee buddies to me so i've included a link to a video christmas card from my crazy family to yours. if you're on an iPad,,,,,,it's not gonna work for some reason
http://host-d.oddcast.com/php/application_UI/doorId=1177/clientId=299/?mId=53134058.2

Re: And the answers are....

congratulations, sheila! i thought the astrantia seeds were small ears of dried corn in a basket until i enlarged the photo

Re: Jeanne's garden in Washington state, in fall

i do love fall but it doesn't last very long then winter hangs around FOREVER it seems. great shots of your garden and i re visited and compared to the earlier submissions. love the bamboo BUT how do you contain it? i have Fargesia (a clumper) but it's not the same effect

Re: Anne's garden in Quebec

may, i thought you had one at your place climbing on something. i learned about it from someone and you got the credit

Re: Anne's garden in Quebec

another great Canadian garden spot! we have enjoyed them from the atlantic to the pacific and all are just great. that rose is spectacular and i learned of Zephirine drouhin from May . my checkbook is suffering collateral damage from this blog. great job, Anne

Re: Karen's August visit to Butchart Gardens

wGardens and i was whining because it was 31

Re: Karen's August visit to Butchart Gardens

i'm thinking Michelle has on her traveling shoes this week, nigeria, australia, canada and soon Seattle. i always love photos of Butchart gardens it just never gets old.
what would terrify me rather than the public speaking part would be trying to decide which gpod gardens to show and talk about. there have been SO many good ones but Pauline's garden is always one of my favorites, the garden and the story behind it. is there going to be a podcast of your presentation?

Re: Alicia's garden in Connecticut

i've never had a deer problem with Cryptomeria but that is NOT to say they won't graze on them in other areas. i can only speak from my experience here in Tennessee

Re: Alicia's garden in Connecticut

alicia, i don't want to rock the boat or intrude on your garden but a tree we use with great success here for screening is Cryptomeria japonica 'Yoshino',Zone 5, branched to ground level, flexible enough to shed snow so no breakage and i have had them to put on as much as 5 ft in height in one season. michelle or carla could tell you if it's a performer in CT or not. they will sometimes "bronze" in very cold temps but green up almost overnight in spring. if you haven't already planted or decided on a particular plant you might want to investigate this tree, it's a real winner here. i'm curious about the close up of the white flowers too

Re: Alicia's garden in Connecticut

i'm late! gloriaj didn't give me a wakeup call today. nice garden and i like the backstory of this new garden, new home and new life. AND am i the only one who doesn't have a snazzy garden shed and fancy fish? and i agree , that propeller/torii gate is just great

Re: Annita's garden and nurserywork in NIGERIA!

i did not realize until just now that you had to carry water from the stream to the nursery area! i will never complain about dragging a water hose again,,,,,,,,,maybe

Re: Sabrina & Freeland's new garden temple in California

trashywoman! well, this made my morning to see your post here. GOOD to see ya!!!

Re: Sabrina & Freeland's new garden temple in California

i love this place and these people! i like this garden temple more than my house and would probably spend more time in it than my house if i had it here. when i start to suffer tunnelvision or my brain starts to shut down i visit their website or the previous posts here to break down the walls and allow me to see things in a different light. the sculptures made from things i would never think of always charge me up and many days i NEED that! i could spend days if not weeks exploring this garden discovering new things and details

Re: Annita's garden and nurserywork in NIGERIA!

no no no , Annita, you are the STAR and these photos are all YOUR work and results. all i did was push you through the door! and yes i will expect more photo submissions in the future! i'm thinking you could probably start a a fabric export business too

Re: Annita's garden and nurserywork in NIGERIA!

just got home and rushed to check here. Annita, i told you everyone would love your photos! i gotta tell everybody that this nurserywoman is such a great person on so many levels and i'm really glad she emailed me out of the blue and i do look forward to letters and photos she sends me from Nigeria.
also i want to thank everyone for the kind words they had for me! who knew?!?!?! by the way, my birthday is next week and i do accept PayPal :)!

Re: Annita's garden and nurserywork in NIGERIA!

gloriaj, those are the nicest things you said about me and i do appreciate it. we are all neighbors we just don't live nearby each other and yes i'm an early riser. i gotta get up early to start talking! i'm glad i (unknowingly) encouraged you to submit your garden photos . i like seeing everyones garden efforts no matter the scale and diversity and i have learned SO much here from the comments and the photos and not only about plants. this isn't just a blog it's a community and Michelle is the Mayor

Re: Annita's garden and nurserywork in NIGERIA!

this starts my day off with a BIG smile, Annita. i'm glad your work and story is here today so everyone can see things going on in your area and i love the fact that your tree nursery is fighting deforestation in Nigeria. i also really like the photos of your helpers and the one of you, it's so nice to put a face with the words and photos and Annita, i really want that watering can in the photo next to you! thanks for all your correspondence, stories and photos it's always a highlight when i find them in my Inbox. and yes, Michelle ,,,,,,,,i'm a talker and a jokester

Re: Sue's garden in Arkansas

i would say very busy! that is an amazing amount of work in only 2.5 years. i think you had a long list of "want to grow" plants you built up while living in florida. it all looks great and one of my favorite parts,,,,,,,the rectangular cut stone building the raised bed areas.

Re: Surinder's INDOOR garden in New Jersey

there is even a glass saguaro on the side table. sheila will be snagging that

Re: Surinder's INDOOR garden in New Jersey

one more question. are the hanging pots on a pulley to be lowered for water or do you have to climb a ladder? ok, two questions,,,,,,,,what about drippage? i always make a mess watering things inside. ok three, what about dust on the leaves? this is really like living in the garden, great job and i'm sure it amazes every visitor just as much as it has me

Re: Mystery plant

it's the flower/seed pod of a Coontie fern, Zamia pumila. i have a large one here in a container and the "flowers" always just freak people out. it's a "dinosaur plant" and the only cycad native to north america. very cool plant

Re: Surinder's INDOOR garden in New Jersey

wow, to have that much light inside. although, your outside garden and containers / all beautiful,,, i think the indoor collection is even more impressive considering all the work it requires. i'm blown away by it all. how do you water it all? i'm sure you have a method/system that makes it easier but it looks like a 24/7 job to me. Michelle is right , healthy, full, vibrant and a beautiful house too. i strive for that much order inside but if there is a flat surface i tend to pile something on it.

Re: Sharlene's garden in New York

patty, i think the birdfeeders were attracting an easy buffet for the hawks,,,,,,,,,,,dinner on the fly

Re: Sharlene's garden in New York

yep, that's tyson weiss, i love his work. samuel salcedo does some amazing things too as does leslie fry. thanks for the info and again,,, your place is just snazzy

Re: Sharlene's garden in New York

are those Tyson Weiss fish?

Re: Sharlene's garden in New York

well, this is all just spectacular. the plantings, the garden pavilion (it's way more than a shed) the planters, urns and birdbath (i just looked at Longshadow website, wow)and i really really want those fish! i gotta ask, what is your secret deer protection system? i think i spied a fencepost in the woods, is the entire property fenced to ensure survival of those perfect Hosta? it's all just great, Sharlene and i'm glad i got up this early to see it

Re: Maurizio's garden in Italy! (6 photos)

i guess the mystery is now in Maurizio's hands. my agapanthus aren't nearly that large,,, not even close

Re: Maurizio's garden in Italy! (6 photos)

but Vojt, what is the big clumpy, strappy, amaryllisey looking thing? how's that for botanical clarity

Re: Maurizio's garden in Italy! (6 photos)

vojt, looks to be a giant Phormium in the background too. this garden is chock full of all the plants i love and don't have the climate for here

Re: Maurizio's garden in Italy! (6 photos)

maurizio, 3rd photo in the left column. what is the large clump of broad/strap leaved plant? crinum maybe? and the tall, openly branched tree in the background?

Re: Maurizio's garden in Italy! (6 photos)

amo questo giardino! great job, Maurizio, textural, "layerful" and full, my kind of place. great job. i really like seeing what others are doing around the world

Re: Marjorie's condo-brightening garden in Ohio

100 thumbs up before 7:30 am, i think you hit thisone out of the ballpark, Marjorie !

Re: Marjorie's condo-brightening garden in Ohio

wow, talk about a Kodak photo spot! sure there have been many family photos taken there with that backdrop. i would tell my g'son that Mother Nature lives there. beautiful, vibrant and luxurious entryway, Marjorie, and what a tribute to your own creativity and skills as well as to your mothers gift to you. nice job! makes it easy to give directions to your place: "just look for a few flowers by the front door"

Re: Barb's garden in Wisconsin, revisited

all those perfect Hosta leaves! makes me very envious, also checked the previous features. isthis really only your fifth season at the property? lottsa work you've done . the bloodroot makes me anxious for spring even though winter hasn't really started here yet. thanks!

Re: Jeanne's garden in Washington state (5 photos)

i'm curious about the hardy red bananas too. i've always treated them as annuals here as opposed to Musa basjoo,,, have i been throwing money away?

Re: Jeanne's garden in Washington state (5 photos)

i never even saw the flamingos!

Re: Jeanne's garden in Washington state (5 photos)

yet another beautiful space in PWN, i love it all. great job, Jeanne. is that Japanese Forest Grass in the 2nd photo?!?!?! if so, it's the biggest i have ever seen and my favorite shot is the last one, vistas/layers/textures, all super

Re: A second year in Christine's Quebec veggie garden

meander1, teasing and banter is always welcome and you're right hats are my trademark and being a landscaper in the weather all the time they are a necessity. no livestock here so as i told AnneK,,,,,,i'm all hat and no cattle.

Re: A second year in Christine's Quebec veggie garden

christine, those tomatoes make my mouth water. for me,,,,,summer tastes like a tomato

Re: Happy Thanksgiving!

oh, Mike, i just saw the pie crust photo. RIP

Re: Happy Thanksgiving!

i wondered what would be the post for T'giving or if you would take a day off! what a nice surprise to see Pauline and Irvin's garden, one of my favorites, and their words are a perfect, comforting and reflective way to start this day. i'm a newcomer here but it has been fun and i have met some great people and serious gardeners and i'm fortunate enough to have met some gpod'ers and to correspond with a few. it's all good and michelle, you have the patience of Job to publish this blog each and everyday . Trashywoman i'm especially glad to know you're out there!!!! i'm hoping everybody has the best Thanksgiving ever . Pauline and Irvin, i feel as if i have been to your garden by seeing your photographs but if i'm ever in Carmichael i REALLY want to take a walk through the plantings, i'll even pull weeds / that should be an easy job for me as i've never seen any weeds in your photos, enjoy the day and make it a great one

Re: The story of Daniela's shady garden path in Ohio (8 photos)

may, my cultivator disks today are big rusty snowflakes, i'm trapped inside and spending way too much time online here and you're right,,, it's much less physical work to suggest things, i kinda like it. one caution for the disks, i have bashed my head SO many times when working under that tree and standing up without thinking. i have battlescars

Re: The story of Daniela's shady garden path in Ohio (8 photos)

one more thought then i'm gonna shut up.
have you considered some of the Mahonia varieties? mine are in flower right now
european wild ginger
Danae racemosa? not sure it's hardy there
Syneilesis aconitifolia is another favorite and nobody ever knows what it is, especially cool when emerging in spring, fun plant
Rohdea japonica is another one i like to use . ok, i'm done or else i'll rattle on all day while watching it snow

Re: The story of Daniela's shady garden path in Ohio (8 photos)

daniela, i kinda KNEW you already had the hypericum! it's a very cool plant to have. Ilex verticillata is another favorite for fall interest and it doesn't have to have a wet/boggy soil to put on a show,,, just be sure to plant a boyfriend somewhere nearby for the girls. snow here too, not a lot, but enough to keep me inside

Re: The story of Daniela's shady garden path in Ohio (8 photos)

daniela, my coffee is kicking in now. you might want to check out (you probably already grow this) Hypericum inodorum,,,,,,,,it's been a good one for me. there is a whole series of varieties. even though it is described as full sun,,, i have used them successfully in high open shade along just such an environment as yours and they are Zone 5 hardy. just a thought. they might get larger than you want though.
have a FUN thanksgiving!

Re: The story of Daniela's shady garden path in Ohio (8 photos)

daniela, i always enjoy your garden and writing and happy to see your solutions for a trouble spot here today. another great job. in fact, i have a few spots here at home that need attention so put on your thinking cap and help me out.
light dusting of snow here, i'm NOT ready for this

Re: A few years in Linda's garden in Washington state

linda, i wish Melianthus was invasive here. i would gladly fight it's spread to have that plant thrive here. i might not say that if it truly did thrive

Re: A few years in Linda's garden in Washington state

today's feature has convinced me that i should have moved to PNW years ago! it's all so full and vibrant and with each plant screaming "look at me" . great garden , Linda, and yes i refreshed my memory by re visiting previous features. i think i spied a Melianthus in the late spring 2008, love that plant and any plant that smells like peanut butter drives kids crazy

Re: Catherine's garden on Vancouver Island

what kind of holly is that by the gate? i thought it was a camellia but after everyones comments i'm seeing holly leaves too

Re: Catherine's garden on Vancouver Island

may, i agree with meander in that you and catherine are lucky to have each other so nearby. trading ideas and plants and just hanging out. catherine, how have you blocked your pond? i have a 2 y/o grandson and he goes straight to the pond and/or fountains and i'm not as quick and bendy as i once was to catch him in time

Re: Catherine's garden on Vancouver Island

ok, dinner at Michelle's that's enough turkey for a big crowd. if we just show up with wine and food she won't make us leave

Re: Catherine's garden on Vancouver Island

mike, that's exactly how i lost my cardoon the first attempt. they were mistakenly removed by my helper who proudly told me that they got ALL those thistles out before they went to seed, same thing happened to poppies one year

Re: Catherine's garden on Vancouver Island

Catherine, is that a weeping birch? or katsura? behind the grouping of sunflowers? i just spotted your ceramic starfish, i really need to examine photos more closely before i comment

Re: Catherine's garden on Vancouver Island

Catherine, is that a weeping birch? or katsura? behind the grouping of sunflowers? i just spotted your ceramic starfish, i really need to examine photos more closely before i comment

Re: Catherine's garden on Vancouver Island

Katherine, you and May are 2 forces of nature and your place is beautiful as is hers. i've always wanted a gate like that but have no place to put it and i covet your Cardoon, no luck with them here . every garden featured from Canada is so lush and full and yours is no exception. i see lime green garden clogs on the porch,,,,,,,,,is Jane Eliz hiding in your garden?

Re: Dixter in the drizzle

i do love this blog! busy times here and i'm late reading this one and after a google search i see that i MISSED fergus garrett speaking in spartanburg SC which is only 2 hours or so away,,,,,,,,,grrrrrrrrrrr

Re: Karen's garden in Illinois, through the years

i'm late as i left early to get mistletoe and christmas stuff and i'm glad i'm late so i could read the method of construction of the arches,,,,,,,,,,i want pics of Karen climbing those curved ladders to tie up plants!!! i also just figured out that Karen is hortiphila. great vistas and seasonal changes you have created. different garden personalities in each season.. great space and photos

Re: Marybeth's career-changing garden in New Jersey (12 photos)

i must have awakened this morning way early for a reason and that was to see this garden feature. what a beautiful space you and your husband have created. how old is the garden? is that a dawn redwood in the last photo on the left and do you have problems with Itea suckering up and keeping it under control. i had forgotten how brilliant Oxydendron can be in fall in addition to their summer flowers, i gotta carve out a space for a few here. great garden, Marybeth

Re: Deb & Paul's garden in the Wisconsin woods

may, you are not too late,,, we've been waiting for you!

Re: Deb & Paul's garden in the Wisconsin woods

gin tonic and now cigars, , , all we need is a poker table and palm tree and it's HAVANA!

Re: Deb & Paul's garden in the Wisconsin woods

gloria, give it time . i was covered up in figs this year for the first time. the previous 4 years i only got maybe one or two a day but this year gallons and gallons of fruit. my g'son would try to climb the trees to get them. hope the surgery went smoothly and you're on the road to wellness, spring will be here before you know it!

Re: Deb & Paul's garden in the Wisconsin woods

gloriaj, glad i can provide a chuckle now an then. feel free to send me some of those fig preserves you made this summer!

Re: Deb & Paul's garden in the Wisconsin woods

BIG annabelle by the door! and the ligularia really pops against that dark wall. hostas are always great but i have given up on them here other than in containers. michelle, we keep Skeeter Juice on hand here and it's very effective/ can be bought online with a simple google search. friends in Charleston use nothing but Tonic Water just splash it on and go or you can mix with gin and use internally, bugs still bite but you won't care

Re: Nancy's garden in New York, in fall

Nancy, the 2 days the berries are ripe are almost as good as the 15 minutes they flower in spring! i do love the Serviceberry trees though, flowers/bark color and texture/berries and GREAT fall color and you're right they fit in small spaces and they do look homey and not so "done"

Re: Nancy's garden in New York, in fall

i have really enjoyed all the autumn vistas shared from across the continent and today was no exception. i also re visited your prior feature this morning. glad to see serviceberries used, i love those trees AND the fruit! and thanks for adding yet another plant to my must have list,,,,,,sanguisorba/ that's a new one for me to try

Re: Autumn in Central Park

i always always enjoy public gardens in an urban setting and this one is especially nice. color, perfectly groomed and a wonderful sanctuary. living here in a small southern rural town a public garden consists usually of 2 bradford pears, 3 crape myrtle and a handful of knock out roses :(

Re: Bill & Linda's garden in Pennsylvania, throughout the season (12 photos)

waking up to 20 degrees this was a warm wakeup! i somehow missed your previous feature so i visited this morning. Both are spectacular, i love it all. i always forget about snowmound spirea until i see them in flower. i'm also glad to see the tire swing and learn of the secret garden,,,, gotta get them interested when young and they DO remember time in the garden when they grow up. a great space you have created and a wonderful garden for the family

Re: This red is unreal!

no worries, i was just teasing we gotta brag when we have the opportunity !

Re: Fall in Michaele's garden in Tennessee (8 photos)

vojt, that muhly grass is on my plant lust list. i can grow it in Kingsport about 10 miles away where i do most of my work but it will not grow here at my house, it never returns in spring and i'm one valley north of Kingsport. Mike's muhlies are always beautiful.

Re: Fall in Michaele's garden in Tennessee (8 photos)

as always beautiful photos of your place and you're right about the Muhly grass it's something else this time of year. i gotta get to Friendsville in the spring for a garden tour when the veronica flowers.

Re: Fall in Nancy's garden in Oregon (7 photos)

i'm loving all the fall shots too and even a little excited about winter coming. i enjoy it until 2 january then i'm ready for spring. i think i NEED that black Daphne here at home. thanks, Nancy , for turning me on to that plant

Re: Fall in May's garden in British Columbia

may, i'm going to put chicken wire on all the wooden inclines going in and out of storage buildings and workshops. i don't know how many times i have skated down those things you have solved my problem with that trick, thx

Re: Fall in May's garden in British Columbia

why is there chicken wire on the floorboards in the top photo on the right?

Re: Fall in May's garden in British Columbia

may, i always love seeing your garden and todays visit was no exception. absolutely beautiful in all seasons and from all viewpoints

Re: This red is unreal!

ok, Miss My Maple is Redder than Yours :) mine just turned brown with the cold snap so no color this year. your color there is great, Daniela

Re: Karen's garden in Missouri (4 photos)

i thought that was Skylands oriental spruce but wanted to confirm. after a number of years they "take off" mine is about 15 ft now so get ready 'cuz it's gonna grow

Re: Karen's garden in Missouri (4 photos)

lots of color/work and satisfaction. glad to see it all. Karen, in the first photo what is the small yellow plant just to the right of the coreopsis? and further back the dark leafed plant in the pot sitting on top of the brick edging. i'm curious about both of those

Re: Scenes from The Pocket Park in New York (5 photos)

julie, in the first photo what is the dark purple plant just above the variegated yucca?

Re: Scenes from The Pocket Park in New York (5 photos)

rich, full, luxurious and tapestrylike. i love this park. i'm with gunnevi, i'm saving the pics too for future inspiration.

Re: Jeff's season finale in Tennessee

wGardens, i like the Cryptomeria japonica 'Gyokuryu' i'm sure that's mis spelled but it will get you a pop up on google. it doesn't get over 10 ft and it can be kept on the skinny side AND it's Zone 5/ i just looked. the only complaint i have and it's a small one is that here if it gets cold cold and stays that way for a few days they will bronze but early spring almost overnight they green up .

Re: Jeff's season finale in Tennessee

de nada, wGardens, Crippsii is a great plant but they do get large and i do not like them all trimmed/sheared/shaped.
Carla, you're never gonna give me a break over my GIANT monkey puzzle trees :)

Re: Fall in Gail's Rhode Island garden (5 photos)

the tree in the 2nd photo looks like a big BBQ potato chip, i'm loving all this fall color from everywhere is it a sugar maple?
that stackstone wall in the 3rd pic looks snazzy as well. watch over that large stone because i'm sure Vojt is planning a midnight raid to get it out of there!

Re: Jeff's season finale in Tennessee

bee1nine, i'm probably just "burned out" with azaleas i have seen so many of them and have had so many problems with lacebugs , frozen flowers and the last few years it seems lichens have attacked with a vengeance and then there the deer . . they seem to love to eat them . you're right, it's spider azalea i don't know why i called it a spider web, must be a halloween hangover. the Encore Az here just don't seem to flower very well reliably could be my method of using them, i just don't know. i get more punch out of other things with much less work. give them a try and let me know how they do for you

Re: Jeff's season finale in Tennessee

janeeliz IF we have snow i'll be out taking pictures, some years we have none and we rarely get more than 3 or 4 inches and it melts quickly. that striped plant next to the azalea is actually a pineapple.
i don't do anything to the pitcher plants other than keep them wet, i'm sure there are hardy varieties of them. this year with all the rain many of the pitchers were knocked down and when i cut them off i found that it wasn't so much the rain that knocked them over but the fact that they were full of sowbugs. everyone who visits here seems to like them . the flowers look not of this world.

Re: Jeff's season finale in Tennessee

may you don't need a bathtub. i have a client who sinks plastic bowls into his beds and grows them there. i planted 12 in the bathtub originally and a few fly traps. the flytraps and small pitcher plants were killed by birds, the remaining varieties have pretty much filled the tub. i have seen them in non draining pots but i'm here to tell you that up close they can be smelly after a few bugs get into the pitchers. i'm lucky here in all my planting i could carry the rocks/pebbles in one hand that i have unearthed the soil is like cake up to 4 ft deep but that's as deeply as i have excavated. now go buy that sarracenia!

Re: Jeff's season finale in Tennessee

flowerladydi, hope you are now well because it's tree planting time!

Re: Jeff's season finale in Tennessee

daniela, the alternanthera (sp) is the multicolored plant in the front of the pot, Josephs Coat.
hortiphila, i've never had a problem with Crippsii or any other Chamaecyparis they don't like it too dry but other than that i don't do anything to them. if you like Chams my personal favorite is Koster's
bee1nine, i'm not a big azalea fan because of their short flower season and the problem of lacebugs here but i thought Encore would convert me,,,,,,it has not. deciduous azaleas i like but most of the evergreen ones just don't thrill me other than that 1 or 2 weeks in spring and they are absolutely everywhere. i do kind of like the spider web azalea but have had no luck finding one.
i've been at this property for 23 years but moved many many many large plants with me when i came here.
AnneK the pig is , in fact, a weathervane i don't remember where i found him as i'm forever dragging things home

Re: Jeff's season finale in Tennessee

wildthyme, that is rosemary and the plant amongst the rebar is a Wingthorn Rose, blood red translucent HUGE thorns.
may, sarracenia requires a boggy soil, mine are planted in a submerged bathtub filled with peat/soil/leaf mold and i top dress it each year. the "books" say not to give them chlorinated water but it has never hurt mine. the venus fly traps always get pulled up by the birds.
daniela, my maples won't turn a bright red this year that one cold night turned the leaves brown so no real color this year. i got that plant from Bob Bullington about 30 years ago as a 2 or 3 year graft it's maybe 8 ft tall and probably 15 ft across. my g'son hides inside it or goes there to have snacks.

Re: Jeff's season finale in Tennessee

mainer, i'm sure there are varieties of Sarracenia that would grow for you there i think some are Zone 4,,,,,,,,,i am 6b but right near the line for 7a so i push the limits on some things and have had success with some palms , Fatsia, Danae racemosa , Fargugium and some other things,,, it's all about location location location. i do not bring the banana inside it remains in the earth year round and will start coming up again end of April but Musa basjoo is the only one that is hardy enough for year round planting. i can't bring it in as i have every nook and cranny full the basement full, some things buried in the compost pile and still i gave away many many many plants and had to throw away as many more

Re: Jeff's season finale in Tennessee

vojt, i guess the freeze is a price we pay for living in the mountains one just never knows what will happen. i sent Michelle pics of some Agave but i can not get her excited about "the danger garden" :)

Re: Jeff's season finale in Tennessee

gloriaj that bana was so luxuriant and green one day and totally "melted" the next they got very large this year from all the rain.
wGardens the yellow conifer in that photo is Chamaecyparis 'Crippsii' they can and do get large
Acanthus neighbors to the left with a few remaining leaves is Fothergilla gardenii and to the right the evergreen is Cryptomeria japonica 'Gyrokyru' and i probably mis spelled that
poor Michelle, i sent so many photos for her to sort through, i had no idea which ones she would use today so it was a surprise to me too

Re: Donna's shrinking-lawn garden in California

evidence of lots of work and good harvests i'm sure. what variety is that very flowery climbing rose?

Re: What is this thing? (don't remember planting it...)

i'm with Heycorrie but i have NO idea what kind of iris it might be

Re: A bit of a Squash

i'm kinda with you on that pumpkin pie thing , i never did learn to like it. toasted seeds, however, i like a lot

Re: What is this plant?

May, i wish i had grown P. somniferum here this year, it's been quite an unsettling week! poppies might help :)

Re: What is this plant?

poppy

Re: Carol's lawn-turned-garden in Texas (12 photos)

carol, i love your property. i would like exploring the garden as it is full of plants i am not familiar with in gardens here. seeing glimpses of neighboring houses i think i love your neighborhood too! the stone terrace is a great place to have a drink on a HOT texas evening and i know from experience what a job that must have been.

Re: Petra's part-time garden in Vermont (8 photos)

i wish my full time garden looked as full as your part timer! i am now convinced that tiger eye sumac is a plant more for northern gardens i always see it flourishing in photos taken much further north than me . it doesn't do well for me here and i've killed more than a few. it's all great but i covet the grind stones next to the hydrangea and especially the Pianosaurus

Re: Nancy's garden in Oregon, revisited

well, i'm a day late and a dollar short,,,,,,again. i remember your garden from previous posts but i revisited. you have created some great refuges within your sanctuary, i think it's much more than a garden . i love the rooms and hidden areas. i gotta try Impatiens omeiana next year. i was also glad to see the saxifrage, it's sort of a forgotten plant here but i use it quite a bit. good luck with the garden talk, i do that quite a bit and photos always help move things along and get people asking questions. sometimes though, the garden club members are more interested in what's for lunch than anything i could ever day :) have fun!

Re: J. Doe

Bergenia?

Re: Mystery House Plant

EllieMaye,,,,,,who are you??!?!? and where can i sign up for classes :)

Re: Isabel's brand new side garden in New Jersey (9 photos)

you accomplished a lot in only 4 weekends my back hurts just thinking about it! but doesn't it feel good when you finish and see what all you have accomplished. it looks great and what an improvement over that pachysandra (that stuff is a job to remove) and what a stroke of luck to find the flagstones,,, rocks are not cheap nor are they easy to transport. great job in creating a beautiful area and one that can be used/enjoyed daily.

Re: One view, four seasons in Lori's Colorado garden (4 photos)

ok, Lori, now i need to know which conifer varieties people question. i have many many dwarf conifers here and the "weird" ones are always my favorites both in the earth and in containers. you picked a winner with Orangeola, great all season color and habit.

Re: One view, four seasons in Lori's Colorado garden (4 photos)

as always your place looks great, Lori. changing seasons give us different gardens in the same place. i like seeing water hoses in photos,,,,,,,let's me know that you've been working! i so take them for granted at my place that i don't notice them. don't roll them up as i'll be using them again so often. you have achieved a great look and view

Re: Daniela's garden in spring (12 photos)

ok, i think these are my favorite photos of Daniela's garden so far. with a projected 24 degrees on friday these show me that there is life at the end of the tunnel. thanks Daniela for sharing all these photos, i thoroughly enjoyed this years Danielafest. it's all great

Re: Pam's obsession with succulents in her California garden

i love seeing California gardens full of all those plants i can only grow as houseplants. i would die of Sheila Schultzitis if i lived there i'm sure. bittersweet post as we are getting our first freeze tomorrow night so today is deciding what to compost and what to save in the succulent collection. great plants, Pam. wish i could send some Aloes to you!

Re: Daniela's newly fenced veggie garden in Ohio (12 photos)

daniela, i was only teasing (sorta) about the every year thing. 2 things that will work people WAY too much and almost make them crazy: public garden tours and garden weddings. i'm sure , though, given the challenge you would pull it off beautifully

Re: Daniela's newly fenced veggie garden in Ohio (12 photos)

daniela, you are one big surprise after another. your place should be on the garden tour every year all summer long! my vegetable patch is a blemish on the landscape. yours, however, is a crowning jewel. Michelle, you can't mention additional photos and then hold out till winter, i wanna see them now. if you run out of pics in january,,,,, re runs

Re: Quince for the memory

well looks like i gotta find some "real" quince to grow next year

Re: Winter is beautiful in Daniela's garden (12 photos)

thank you May, i knew i liked you when i first saw your garden and you were growing figs in a pot. it's pretty clear Daniela knows what she's doing . i wish she and the family could come to Tennessee and help me, , i'm weak in my perennial experience and knowledge.

Re: Winter is beautiful in Daniela's garden (12 photos)

daniela does not want shrubs,,, nor does she need them. she is a perennial girl! it's her garden . please for the love of god just give it the hell up. i said i wouldn't respond but jeebus enough is enough

Re: Quince for the memory

i never knew until today that there was a Cydonia, i only knew Chaenomeles and thought that was THE quince. i'm sure i will never find one for sale or find the fruits in the market but i'm gonna search now!
one note: Uruguay, great country,,, Punta del Este, Jose Ignacio , Montevideo is nice in it's aged, a little bit neglected, old world charm in the new world and Colonia is a step back in time!
now off to search for Quince

Re: Winter is beautiful in Daniela's garden (12 photos)

well, Aarchman you have now made me hungry for snow! thanks for reminding me of the fun side of winter

Re: Winter is beautiful in Daniela's garden (12 photos)

man that's a lot of snow! it is beautiful to see in YOUR garden not sure i could handle that much here having never experienced it before i would be overwhelmed. and a vegetable garden on Monday, you continue to surprise and amaze,Daniela, i will look forward to Monday. yep, you rock

Re: Daniela's border in Ohio, from the opposite side (10 photos)

i use the branches as well and also have had them to take root. BIG difference between putting them into moist soil as opposed to a brushpile.

Re: Scenes from Bonnie's Pennsylvania garden in 2013 (12 photos)

bonnie, it all looks wonderful,,, the color, the plantings, the labyrinth and i esp. like the kinetic sculpture (i'm old school hillbilly so for me it's a whirlygig). also re visited your previous features and enjoyed that as well. AND another blog, i'm either slow or lazy because i could never keep up with a blog,, i'm glad others can and do

Re: Daniela's border in Ohio, from the opposite side (10 photos)

what i have learned from the past 2 days other than the garden is beautiful is that i NEED to develop an Excel spreadsheet because my brain is vanishing fast.
and tractor i just have to say (penitentiary? stainless steel razor wire????) such a belittling statement for an area so full of beauty, hard work and devotion. i was always told growing up that nobody ever looks big by trying to make others look small and to never be 'that guy'. i'm sorry you missed that lesson , i had to say that but i won't respond to your negativity again, it's predictable and i don't see it ever changing.

Re: Daniela's border in Ohio, from the opposite side (10 photos)

more beautiful shots from a different point of view and it's just as nice as yesterday. AND a blog, how in the world do you find the time?!?!? but you do and it's all great.

Re: A season in one border in Daniela's Ohio garden

daniela, i was impressed with your garden and your photography but after reading your description of creating your database, , well, what can i say?!?!?!? i need that here because it sometimes takes me a couple of days for the name to pop into my head. you rock

Re: A season in one border in Daniela's Ohio garden

daniella, it all looks GREAT. i loved seeing the progression and i can't believe i have never done this sort of photo series. i'm envious of The Rocket but i am most envious of that beautiful black soil. all of your plants are so vibrant and brimming with health

Re: Nature's bowling ball!

glad to know you are human, EllieMaye

Re: Revisiting Jane's Maine garden in fall (6 photos)

jane, i came back for one more quick look before heading out. save a spot for me on the front steps when ancientgardener drops in, i think i could learn A LOT.

Re: Revisiting Jane's Maine garden in fall (6 photos)

JaneEliz the front garden looks exactly as i envisioned after seeing your other features and to use a Michelle description,,,,,,,,,,dreamy. i love it all but i especially love the bumblebee in the clematis flower. the only thing that could make it better would be for you to have been standing by the front door (i always "see" the gardener in my minds eye but i'm never right) but i do see Tasha peeking around the corner of the house. you have created a beautiful space and HOME

Re: Carol & Bill's FOR SALE garden in Georgia

great back "yarden". can't imagine moving and starting over exhausts me to think about it. i especially like that above ground pool/pond/fountain and the stone bench. i found the pathway/pedestal and camellia but where is the head?!?!? i wish everyone could have at least one Daphne even if they do sometimes experience that sudden death syndrome i always get another

Re: Bonnie's Zone 4 garden in Minnesota (12 photos)

i do not think we were boasting about junipers other than to say there are some stellar varieties available now to use for color, durability and survivability. deer won't eat anything/everything and i have a list of plants i have never had a single leaf, needle or awl touched by deer and would be happy to share that with you. even when things adjacent have been eaten down to a nub they won't touch many plants used in a landscape here. i do not, however, know what all would grow in your area.

Re: Nature's bowling ball!

i don't know, , the fruit ,leaves and branching habit looks A LOT like Xylocarpus and EllieMaye is Queen of Hortiphilia, i trust her ID's without question

Re: Bonnie's Zone 4 garden in Minnesota (12 photos)

containers are done but i have 2.5 more months of planting/construction to do then start back up mid february. i figger Vojt would be right in on the agave mission especially if we take a few rocks as well

Re: Bonnie's Zone 4 garden in Minnesota (12 photos)

yes, sheila, i'm up for that road trip. garden ninjas,, i think we could pull it off IF they didn't hear us laughing. we could travel with it and send emails of it in different locations to Bonnie. the winter container sounds great. i finish mine this week and i'll be GLAD

Re: Bonnie's Zone 4 garden in Minnesota (12 photos)

wildthyme i'm with you on the juniper thing and not just in cold climates. there are SO many good cultivars out there for use now. current favorites Gold Strike and Mother Lode and Saybrook Gold is always a winner. looks like i'm gonna have to fight with Sheila for that agave sculpture, she's feisty so i might lose

Re: Bonnie's Zone 4 garden in Minnesota (12 photos)

i'm now thinking that coppery plant is in fact a coppery metal agave sculpture. you gotta solve this mystery for me

Re: Bonnie's Zone 4 garden in Minnesota (12 photos)

wow, bonnie, i would almost move north to Zone 4 just to have sumac like yours. i'll trade you bananas, crotons and cannas for those anytime. that fernleaf peony is another stunner . what is the copper leafed plant in the top right photo? i think i'm having Zone 4 envy here, ok maybe not because i'm a cold weather wuss but your garden looks great and i love it all especially the sumac, grrrrrr. i've killed more than a few of those

Re: Plants in my yard (5)

1st one is Vitex the rest i have no idea. i'm a hillbilly gardener in Tennessee and have lost touch with my California roots

Re: Plants in my yard (6)

2nd one i think might be Perovskia/russian sage
last one i think is a very very thirsty Ligustrum

Re: Donna's reclaimed-pasture garden in Washington (8 photos)

all great and man, what a pasture! i love any garden with lots of "verbena on a stick". favorite photo is 2nd down in right column with the swath of grass and the pine in upper left corner with Miscanthus as the bottom border but every view is beautiful.

Re: Day 2 in Carol Jean's Wisconsin Garden--Veggies and more!

i don't know if i read about vicks or someone told me or i dreamed it but it has worked well for me so far and as an added benefit i don't have to hear all the coughing and hacking of the deer all winter long ,, win win :)

Re: Day 2 in Carol Jean's Wisconsin Garden--Veggies and more!

good luck, May, i hope it works for you. it has been very effective here. i also got plastic "tags" and hung in some susceptible shrubs using christmas ornament hangers. . . so far so good

Re: Day 2 in Carol Jean's Wisconsin Garden--Veggies and more!

carol jean, i grow "skinny apple trees" in containers and use them repetitively (that doesn't even look like a word) you can let the side brances grow.
after years of buying animal repellent (deer and rabbit) and spending LOTTSA money. i discovered this year that vicks vapo rub on popsicle sticks place around works just as well and doesn't wash off in rain and it's much much less expensive than plantskydd

Re: Was suppose to be a pumpkin plant...but it's not!

looks to me much like Periwinkle (Vinca) an annual that does like the heat

Re: Day 2 in Carol Jean's Wisconsin Garden--Veggies and more!

today is more fun than yesterday. re purposed items, outdoor rooms with clocks, mantlepieces and growing artwork, abundant vegetable production. carol jean you are my kind of gardener! what a great yard/garden and your place should be on the garden tour all season.

Re: Revisiting Carol Jean in Wisconsin, including a before-and-after!

carol jean, i came back for a 2nd helping and it's still just wonderful.
ancientgardener, we never get to old to grow new things and you're right it's impossible to quit being a gardener. my g'mom always said that we have to garden as if we will live forever. i have a 92 year old "garden wife" and i can't keep up with her/ she's a barrel of energy

Re: Revisiting Carol Jean in Wisconsin, including a before-and-after!

carol jean, looks like you made the switch from shade to sun with NO problems at all. the adaptation of your garden is great and it all looks great . glad you were on the garden tour as it's good to share and to meet fellow gardeners. i wondered where you had gone as i missed reading your comments,,,,,,,,,,now i know where you were as you have been working A LOT in your garden. results are beautiful.

Re: identify this plant I think it is hel something

i agree with Michelle, i have some here in pots and they also are very fragrant.

Re: Revisiting May's garden in British Columbia

may, i love seeing your garden photos and i see that you and i have many of the same plants. i now see where all my "hardy" fuchsias have gone after they disappeared here they are in fuchsia heaven at your place and Lacey has discovered the absolute BEST use for periwinkle. it's all just great

Re: Plants in my yard(4)

alice i am green with envy. i spent some of the best years of my life living in Pacific Grove and Big Sur. sometimes to this day i almost starve for an Ambrosia burger on the terrace at Nepenthe

Re: An inspirational healing garden in Toronto

i returned for another look before starting my day. this is my favorite feature thus far and there have been some pectacular gardens featured. this one, however, makes me happy to be human. the garden, the purpose of it and the community effort to build and develop it. we need MORE of this type of thing around the world

Re: Plants in my yard(4)

1st i agree Callistemon
2nd Pampas grass, Cortadeira
3rd IDK
4th Eucalyptus of some sort
5th Euphorbia myrsinites,,, Donkeys Tail

are you in CA?

Re: Plants in my yard (3)

1st looks like a Podocarpus variety to me
2nd i have seen but can't recall, the name will come to me tomorrow
3rd large leaf,,,,,,,,Calla? can't recall the other one
4th birds nest spruce or similar conifer variety
5th Viburnum davidii?
where do you live as you have alotta stuff there!

Re: An inspirational healing garden in Toronto

what a great story to wake up to. i think this is absolutely wonderful and i love it all,,, the background, the garden itself and it's purpose and use. you have given the patients much more than you could ever imagine , Mary, and i am in awe of your abilities, service and compassion. i can't imagine not being able to get my hands dirty and with this garden you have provided them with an opportunity to re connect with something they have always loved.

Re: It's still summertime in Pauline's Garden

a tandem bicycle! your cool factor just increased by 20X and you were already cool to begin with

Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the Seaside...

well, now i want to holiday in Cornwall it is beautiful but i think the BEST part of the trip would be to spend some time with Boaden Lyne

Re: Plants in my yard (1)

heycorrie, i never met a Carex i didn't like :)

Re: Plants in my yard (1)

i don't know any of these plants but i think i want at least 3 of the first and second

Re: Plant in my yard (2)

i think the first one is lavender judging by the spent flower heads.
2nd is Rosemary
3rd i don't know which variety of grass that is
4th Yarrow
5th IDK

Re: It's still summertime in Pauline's Garden

i always love seeing this garden and i think if i visited every day i would always spy something i had not seen before.this is a garden that needs to be toured with Pauline and Irvin for a walking documentary of each square inch. it's always a treat

Re: Karen & Ted's garden in North Carolina

ok, i'm back for an encore. in the photo captioned "combining a variety of greens and textures for a shady area" is that Chrysogonum used as a groundcover? and what is that variegated tasseled Carex kind of plant? i think i really need at least 5 of those

Re: Beautiful bark and shimmery spiderwebs

gosh, AnneK, how could i NOT stop by? if i'm required i'm a skeered not to! same invitation goes for tennessee and the great smoky mountains

Re: Karen & Ted's garden in North Carolina

great backyard and yep, i covet the garden house. is that Agave attenuata potted on the decking? "there are always agaves if you look hard enough". took me awhile to spot the little visitor

Re: Beautiful bark and shimmery spiderwebs

you are so right, Sheila, and even tho i am a newcomer here and have only ever met one gpod'er , Meander1, i feel as if i know the regular commenters here by their words, their garden photos and by the manner in which they interact with people. i'm convinced that those people who get dirty in the garden are the best .. and Michelle's good will has now spread to Africa. i have been corresponding with a nurserywoman in Nigeria who follows gpod. she has sent me photos of the plants she is growing and she is ever so nice,, another "earthling"

Re: Beautiful bark and shimmery spiderwebs

tractor you are wise to get help with that Fat Albert. gravity is not our friend. we are heading into tree planting season here and even with help,,,,,i will be walking crooked until Christmas from all the wrestling with large trees even with equipment it can still be difficult

Re: Hydrangeas!

i am going to forward this article to madonna :)

Re: Beautiful bark and shimmery spiderwebs

JaneEliz, i forgot to tell you that the red flower is an Anthurium, no clue as to variety just a red anthurium that i got for $1.00 on the clearance rack back in march. it was looking pretty bad. glad you like the head in hands in my garden but you and i both know that Tasha would never allow it in yours :)

Re: Beautiful bark and shimmery spiderwebs

tractor, if you had a Heritage growing next to a regular river birch you would see the difference they "paper" much more and have a better color and variations of color in the bark compared to the standard river birch. if you find Heritage get that variety you won't regret it. thereis a dwarf called Little King that only gets about 8 or 10 ft tall but has very nice bark. sadly mine here died virtually overnight but Meander1 said she has had great success with hers. i wish you could grow Crape myrtle as the different varieties have great bark color. Natchez white bark looks very similar to Stewartia koreana but is faster growing, much easier to find and considerably less expensive.

Re: Beautiful bark and shimmery spiderwebs

AnneK, thanks so much. i'm anxiously awaiting to see your place in print next year. Michelle has told me how awesome it is along with the entire state of Montana and it's people. i'm reading now about a train trip to Glacier traveling on restored rail cars. if you see James West poking around your yard it's not the Wild Wild West it is ME :) have fun!

Re: Beautiful bark and shimmery spiderwebs

cwheat, i have to fess up. that is not the same monkey puzzle as before (it is still tiny tiny) i found larger ones and they are so slow i got one. i want to see it with some size before i die. that is, i think, Carex morrowi Aurea-variegata but i could be wrong as it's been there for years. That Tsuga nana gracilis is about 4 ft tall and at least 8 ft across , there are many sizeable specimens here that i have had for decades. i sent Michelle so many photos last friday . my favorite today is the Metasequoia, the trunk looks very Jurassic park. yep, i gots too much stuff here and your prayer must have worked because my Gunnera is doing great but the water bills will kill ya

Re: Beautiful bark and shimmery spiderwebs

oh, Sheila, if you love Halloween you NEED to come to Tennessee. Halloween is a big deal at this house and there is always a party and costumes are encouraged. if you don't wear a costume you can still attend the party but we will talk about you mercilessly :) moving some succulents in here this week as well

Re: Beautiful bark and shimmery spiderwebs

flowerladydi, i'm small fry too. i used to have installation crew, maintenance crew and it drove me crazy. finally , i said this is NOT fun anymore! i downsized and i am on every jobsite and have a great client list and i have fun everyday,,,,,,,,almost everyday. now i'm off to work at Rotherwood Mansion, google that sometime if you like ghost stories,,, they are not true but they are fun to read now that we are approaching Halloween

Re: Beautiful bark and shimmery spiderwebs

gramamarg, the Borg reference is a Star Trek thing. yes, i'm a geek on many levels

Re: Beautiful bark and shimmery spiderwebs

flowerladydi, i bring all remnants, fragments and broken things home with me. i had those hands reaching out of the Carex and the head was there and it just kind of ended up there and i left it. collecting broken heads now off concrete statues to build a small retaining wall. Addams Family garden i guess. btw, i left my email on the patio is complete feature since you asked for it. would love to see your work there in chicago area since we're both "in the business"

Re: Beautiful bark and shimmery spiderwebs

gardengrl, get out there and fire up that camera! it's always good to share our efforts , success and failures (we all have some of those) with fellow gardeners

Re: Beautiful bark and shimmery spiderwebs

thanks, wGardens, i just noticed in the disc pic that David is in the background. he has worked with me for years and i don't know what i would do without him. the others come and go but David has been with me forever. all the clients love him and i never have to check his work he's a good ole country boy who does NOT know how to lie. he will always tell you the truth even if it is not what you want to hear. i'm so lucky to have him work with me every season.

Re: Beautiful bark and shimmery spiderwebs

ok, i HOPE nobody suffers with Arachnophobia what with all my hillbilly spiders here today. Michelle, i sent you SO many photos i wondered all weekend which ones you would select. sorry for flooding your Inbox so often, i'm outta control

Re: Late summer in Terie's New York Garden

thank you, terieLR, and apologies to my checkbook . i managed to find 3 Firetails locally and will today get them planted. i might need a shoe horn and WD40 to squeeze yet more plants into the yarden

Re: Dreaming of Dahlias

de nada. you're gonna have to write faster,,,,,,,,i'm hungry for the next post!

Re: Late summer in Terie's New York Garden

may, pyracantha don't bother me IF i am consistent with pruning and don't let them get out of control and into attack mode. i have , however, started using Cotoneaster parneyi as i can train it easily, it grows rapidly, heavy berry set and NO THORNS. i forgot to mention another vine,,,,,,,,,,,,,,trumpet creeper AKA the devils shoestrings . Akebia here goes wild and comes up everywhere

Re: Late summer in Terie's New York Garden

as always ,,, lush, full, varied and full of color/texture and always nice to see
i, too, was wondering about porcelain vine control. beautiful plant but i've always had it on my beware list along with sweet autumn clematis , wisteria and akebia. how do you keep ahead of it?

Re: looks like Phormium, but grows too fast

if it had "flowers" i would say Red Fountain grass ( Penneseteum) but with no flowers it could be a Cordyline. i got some of those Cordyline Festival Burgundy off the clearance rack and they look like this and have a shiny shiny leaf that is more thick/tough than fountain grass. if you find Phormium for $5.00 PLEASE call me! Cordyline is listed as Zone 8 but i'm in 6b and have had it to survive the winter ,,,not every year but it has before

Re: The garden at the McCarthy Observatory in Connecticut

very cool! makes it fun to learn and exploring the entire town to learn about the solar system, great. AND it's always important, i think, to sneak in horticulture along the way for children. they do remember when they grow up. i've planted so many flower/vegetable gardens with girl and boy scouts and now they are buying homes and developing their gardens so at least that part "took"

Re: Flora as fauna

rwotzak, door is always open, welcome here anytime

Re: A video tour of Tim's side garden in Columbus!

tim are those agaves i spied by the back steps?!?!? just like danger gardener says: "there are always agaves if you look hard enough" how long have you had them in the earth there? some live here some don't depends on which variety and if i can keep them dry enough in winter

Re: A video tour of Tim's side garden in Columbus!

well, tim, not that your place needed the upgrade at all but i think Michelle just boosted the cool factor of your place with the google glass. was it "weird" wearing/walking/using them?

Re: Flora as fauna

ok, i've seen the spoon flies , heard about the delicious cookies and now you're going to make plant creatures. i need either a big care package sent to tennessee or you need to organize a mission trip here to help me

Re: Flora as fauna

oh, Michelle, that sitting gorilla is indeed "pectacular" :) sorry, i couldn't resist

Re: Flora as fauna

man, i would love to be able to do this at home just to amaze the kids AND the adults but the look of surprise on a childs face would make the effort worthwhile.
gloriaj, i understand that the figs never made it past the tree my g'son tries to climb the tree to get at them

Re: Flora as fauna

fun fun fun. favorites ,,,,,,the Orangutangs and the lemurs

Re: Long Leaves with colorful new growth - What is the name of the shrub

Heycorrie, i feel as if you and i are playing plant jeopardy, too bad we can't win cash and prizes :)
have fun!
j

Re: Long Leaves with colorful new growth - What is the name of the shrub

looks like an ornamental peach to me

Re: New plants in Kathy's Missouri garden

thanks a lot, Kathy, now i gotta have Leptodermis!
yes, wildthyme i've had figs prepared that way and i agree, heaven on a plate. kathy, if you like interesting bark and have room, try Pinus bungeana and Parrotia persica (parrotia grows LARGE and it takes a number of years for the bark to be colorful, great fall color too)

Re: New plants in Kathy's Missouri garden

i think you'll have success, gloriaj, btw, figs figs figs everywhere here. and Kathy, one can NEVER go wrong with a paperbark maple one of my top 5 favorite trees

Re: New plants in Kathy's Missouri garden

gloriaj, i'm in zone 6b and oxalis is a tried and true perennial here, in fact, popping up in many places i don't want it

Re: New plants in Kathy's Missouri garden

all very nice, Kathy! you and i use many of the same plants and i was happy to see the Persicaria Red Dragon, it was a new plant for me thisyear. not familiar with Hydrangea Bobo but will do my "homework". what is the variegated trailing plant in the patio corner that is just below the Oxalis?

Re: Sheila's containers in Colorado

sheila, trust that when one hires as many hole diggers and wheelbarrow pushers as i have over the years you learn to use the term "pothead" quite frequently and sometimes even to describe containers
vojt, some days in february i wish for zone 10 and i think it's more me getting tired and faded moreso than the containers

Re: Sheila's containers in Colorado

i knew today would be awesome and i was not disappointed. i agree about the agave and i have the battle scars to prove it. cacti/succulents=living sculptures
all great and i especially love the "potheads". reading about the evac of boulder. not much i can do but hope it passes soon.

Re: Name of this flower please?

elliemaye you rock BUT looking at photos led me to sunshine farms and barry glick, i'll be penniless forever now.

Re: Sheila's Garden in Colorado

sheila, i do not like that bird a little,,,,,,i like it A LOT

Re: Sheila's Garden in Colorado

i only now spotted the red bird made of garden tools lurking in the background of photo 1. i really should examine the photos more closely before i start typing/talking but we all know that won't happen

Re: Sheila's Garden in Colorado

what a nice surprise this morning and i'm so glad to see Sheila's garden.looks like you have embraced the climate differences since your move and made it yours. if i am ever in Denver and you see some hooligan poking around the garden it will be me. am i the only one who has little to no success with Brunnera?

Re: Gardens at the Toledo Zoo

ancientgardener is that not V. bonariensis in the first photo to the left of the cleome? there are some hot pink/red flowers between the cleome and what i thought was Verbena on a stick but i'm wrong quite often

Re: pom pom flower???? help!!!

just google it and the links will tell you more than you ever wanted to know.

Re: Gardens at the Toledo Zoo

vojt, i agree those containers are exuberant and dense but sadly here at home my containers are starting to look worn out. not sure if they are getting tired or i am getting tired

Re: Gardens at the Toledo Zoo

gloriaj, if you see this,,,,,i am now covered up in figs. hope yours are beginning to ripen

Re: Unknown odd looking (plant?)

elliemaye, i thought i was a plant nerd but i bow down :)

Re: Gardens at the Toledo Zoo

i would stop and linger there as well. glad to see V. bonariensis (verbena on a stick) i always like that plant anywhere it is growing and any garden structures always ignite my curiosity (nosiness) beautiful resting spot and family photo area

Re: Unknown odd looking (plant?)

ellie maye i think you nailed it. how in the world did you know that plant,,,,,,talk about obscure!!! i saw that it is sometimes called bat nut

Re: Unknown odd looking (plant?)

if you discover what it is please post the identity here. i gotta know!

Re: Unknown odd looking (plant?)

my god, that last photo looks like a petrified "sea bat" of some sort. i've never seen anything like this before

Re: Darwin is a dreamboat!

Mike and Darwin, it all looks great and your captions make it even more fun. i GOTTA take time to get to friendsville for a walkabout. i'm glad to see you are also sharing the birdhouses with all of GPOD, the one you brought my wife is a big HIT at her office and the website might make you more busy this winter than you had planned . warning people those birdhouses are heavy!

Re: pom pom flower???? help!!!

pretty sure it's Amaranthus caudatus,,,,,,,,,Love Lies Bleeding

Re: Veronica's garden in New Hampshire, revisited

i keep coming back to these photos. question: did you design/install everything yourself or was there help involved because that is A LOT of work with unbelievable results.

Re: Veronica's garden in New Hampshire, revisited

i only wish my place could be so challenged! absolutely spectacular and i'm blown away,,, then i visited the previous post and i was blown away again.

Re: Surinder's garden in New Jersey

i'm glad to know you also have a cacti collection. i have many and appreciate them all for their easy care and for their sculptural qualities whether they flower or not. send pics of those too!

Re: We saved this tree!

itis beautiful and i do like it IF it doesn't brush cars in the driveway or i don't have to duck to use the front walk. AND flowerladydi,,,,,,,,,,where have you been !?!?!?

Re: Surinder's garden in New Jersey

wow, Surinder, i'm blown away by the number of plants you install every year. if Caladiums haven't hurt that spruce tree in 30 years i say, plant on. i met a fellow gardener who swears by Vicks Vapo Rub as a deer repellent. i have not yet tried that but will . i will look forward to seeing your winter garden

Re: Its a monster!

pawlownia never entered my mind for some reason and they are everywhere here. that's what i get for thinking,,,,,,or not thinking

Re: Surinder's garden in New Jersey

now that is a summer deck. welcoming and full of color. my favorite plant is that Crown of Thorns, i've never seen one so lush and full (yes, Michelle, it's Euphorbia millii :) )

Re: More from Cheryl's garden in Indiana

i just found this concerning Kwanso daylily

From Christopher Lloyd’s Garden Flowers (2000), here’s another good reason to plant double orange ‘Kwanso’ daylily this spring:
“H. x fulva, [the common orange daylily, is] a strapping triploid with tawny-coloured flowers and no scent. It naturalizes easily in quite rough places and is a common sight in India, by the roadside. No doubt it was planted in the first instance, because it cannot seed, but once there it spreads by rhizomes to form a colony. The day before the blooms open, the flower buds are habitually gathered to eat raw or stir-fried, and they are even more scrunchy in the double-flowered variety, ‘Kwanso’. A friend, who at one time gardened in Hong Kong, could for a long while not make out why his daylilies seemed always on the point of flowering, but never flowered. His Chinese cook was responsible. I can recommend the flavor, which resembles that of green figs.” (April 2010)

Re: More from Cheryl's garden in Indiana

cheryl, you're welcome anytime you're in Tennessee. i'm not that farm from Dale Hollow . i'm 1.5 hours from Knoxville, 1 hour from asheville nc and 1.5 from gatlinburg and the smoky mountains nat'l park. it's tractor with 10 acres of mowing , i'm much too lazy for that much upkeep. i would love to see your photos but i am the ONLY person in the world who does not have a facebook account. mimosa's are pretty and hummingbirds love them. they are, however, prolific in their seeding not as many of them as in years past some fungal thing hit them and many many many of them died. meander lives not so far away so you could probably do a grand garden tour and btw,,,, it's ya'll not you all :)

Re: Diminutive Woodland Plant

glad i could help. those plants are tough but NOT very fast or aggressive.

Re: Diminutive Woodland Plant

i'm pretty sure it's Pippsissewa, Winter green, Chimaphila ,,,, probably maculata but could be umbellata. native, medicinal herb. my g'mom used to have us gather it and she would make a tea for bladder ailments. she called it rat's vein

Re: More from Cheryl's garden in Indiana

more great photos, Cheryl. what is the variety name of that double orange daylily? i have that here but never knew it's name i just call it Evelyn because that's whose garden it came from. if you run out of things to do feel free to visit Tennessee and help me!

Re: John's Garden in Wisconsin

may, you're so right. i always smile when someone asks me when my "yard" is going to be finished. i guess when i die it will be finished. and tractor what is your secret to having invasive bleeding heart? mine disappear after 2 seasons

Re: John's Garden in Wisconsin

nice job! and i'm happy to know you're up for an award to acknowledge your efforts. i was also glad to see Joe Pye Weed in the back, not enough people use it especially "Little Joe". Hogan is a replica of our Tiger Lily and how well i know your experience of cocktail hour. weeds have ruined more cocktails here than i can count

Re: Cheryl's garden in Indiana

bravo, Cheryl for all your hard work and colorful results. hard to believe it's only 30 x 40. stonework is always like working a puzzle and the last stone to go in place is always the most beautiful.

Re: Its a monster!

eeeeeeeek, it is a monster AND the plant is big too :) just razzing you Crizmo,,,,,,,is that a Catalpa?

Re: Shrub that smells like heaven!

i have NEVER heard of it's toxic seeds being a problem. wildlife is usually smarter than humans

Re: Shrub that smells like heaven!

if you can grow tea olive you should really get you a Cry Baby Tree

Re: Harriet's vegetable garden in Maine

harriet, yesterday looked beautiful and today looks beautiful AND delicious. how do you have the time?!?!?

Re: Dreaming of Dahlias

i learn more tidbits of horticultural history reading your articles than i do anything else. always a treat, thanks!

Re: Wheel Meet Again...

these are smoky mountain boys,,, you don't want to turn them loose with anything having a motor on it,,,,,chaos will ensue

Re: Shrub that smells like heaven!

i am pretty sure it's Osmanthus fragrans/ Tea Olive,,,,,,planted throughout the south and is a signature fragrance of the deep south. i wish it was hardy here in my area and you're right it is heavenly smelling but not overpowering

Re: Terry & Lorraine's Slope-side Garden in Montana

i'll be right over, AnneK :)

Re: Terry & Lorraine's Slope-side Garden in Montana

tractor, i've seen many places that seemed pretty close to heaven on earth but i'm sure Montana would also be on that list

Re: delicate but very hardy

the flowers look like perhaps a Plectranthus variety but there are MANY MANY of them so i don't know the name but maybe that will point you in the right direction if nobody can identify it. i , too, will be interested in knowing what it is exactly

Re: Maria's lawn-be-gone front yard in Ontario

maria, promise me that you won't muck up that nice area you have developed with RR ties

Re: Terry & Lorraine's Slope-side Garden in Montana

came back to look again and i still love it.
AnneK get that beer chilling because i think i gotta see Montana
and Michelle you're a superstar whether you wanna admit it or not!

Re: Terry & Lorraine's Slope-side Garden in Montana

great spot you have developed and on the slope everything is displayed perfectly for viewing. having never been to Montana i never really thought of gardens and Montana together. i just thought of montana, big sky, horses and cowboys. i'm glad to know i was wrong and my horizons have been expanded. i'm also glad to see the gardeners and who created the featured garden.

Re: Maria's lawn-be-gone front yard in Ontario

it might be heavy but i'm thinking he might be very sly when it comes to boulders :) just razzing you Vojt. make it a great evening, out the door to dentist and to look at some "dawgs"

Re: Maria's lawn-be-gone front yard in Ontario

keep your eye on that boulder, if Vojt can spirit it to Ohio, it's gonna disappear :) i'm spoiled to a 6b/7a garden zone. can't take it much colder and can't deal with much more heat. if i could "figger" out how to deal with the oppressive humidity it would be perfect. keep us posted on the development/growing in of your front yard

Re: Maria's lawn-be-gone front yard in Ontario

Maria, you NEED that bench for Beergaritas! :)
3 ft of snow, i can't imagine if we get 3 inches everything shuts down here and that doesn't happen that often

Re: Maria's lawn-be-gone front yard in Ontario

Maria, it all looks great and much more interesting than "just grass".. . my favorite photo thought,,,,,,,,,the cabbages. like big edible hostas

Re: my coolest plant of 2013

i see i forgot to identify it! it's a Wingthorn Rose

Re: Gloria's garden in Ohio

"if i get them inside" that's me in the fig patch, eat them as i pick them :)

Re: Gloria's garden in Ohio

gloria, when those figs start to come in ,,, if you don't eat all of them fresh/// slice in half, put some gruyere on the fig and pop under the broiler to melt and toast the cheese... heaven on earth

Re: Gloria's garden in Ohio

well, i can tell a gardener lives here! nice groupings and plant variety. i see the fig along the house and mine are slow slow to ripen this year too but the plants are loaded. marigolds,,,,,,always bright and cheerful but i never seem to be able to keep them deadheaded so i haven't planted any in years. i do not hate them but i'm too lazy to grow them

Re: Wheel Meet Again...

i think i will rig up a sail for a wheelbarrow this weekend just to drive the guys crazy when they show up for work on Monday. i never knew until i read this article that wheelbarrows had such a interesting history. apparently, i went about my courtships all wrong, i needed a wheelbarrow!

Re: Kerstin's garden in New York

we have rock ledges here some places but it's rare to find boulders like that unless you're in the mountains. i've worked with rocks, stone so much this year that now i've become very conscious of every rock i see. thx, rwotzak and tractor1

Re: Jeff's patio is done!

diane,,, i am finishing my 26th season in business, degreed in 1981 and have been digging holes since i was 4!

gardenguy37642@gmail.com love to hear from you anytime you have free time

i only have 2 acres here at home but we maintain a bit more than 20 acres of ornamentals NO MOWING we only maintain mulched beds, ornamental plantings and containers.

i have way way way too much stuff here at home but i can get by with it because i am in business . i do some silly ass things here at home because i can. i can not do them on the job and it's fun here at home.

have another cuppa coffee and write me a letter! i'm out the door

Re: Jeff's patio is done!

thanks, Cherry and Carla! cherry i wish i had your knack and talent for container plantings and carla i wish i had your talent for developing such beautiful and free flowing gardens. xie xie!

Re: Kerstin's garden in New York

all looks great to me! you, the chipmunks and squirrels have done a beautiful job. tell me, are those boulders naturally occurring? or did you bring them in

Re: Jeff's patio is done!

tractor our cat died after a long life, the neighbor has 4 and they patrol the garden then go home

Re: Jeff's patio is done!

JaneEliz should you ever be this far south i would be hurt if you didn't visit! you're always welcome here in the valley

Re: Jeff's patio is done!

thanks so much, sheila i really do appreciate it and yeah, i do like to talk :) ask anyone in Kingsport
great danes, that basket came about because of throwaways. everything in it except for the hanging chains was rescued from the trash heap. the frame is made from the iron rim of a rotted out wagon wheel, the basket is made from the wire cages from buying stone, the burlap is just leftover burlap pieces and all the plants were either rescued from the trash heap or bought for almost nothing on the clearance rack. it's about 3.5 ft wide and maybe 18 " deep . i wanted to show what can be done with "trash" and that given the chance almost any plant will thrive.
and YES those stones were a bear to handle , i think they are there to stay forever

Re: Jeff's patio is done!

the "little people" is a cast stone piece done by a local artist she also makes "potheads" of which i have several.
chicago hardy fig,mine are loaded as well but are not ripe and should be i don't know why they are so late this year i have only had a dozen or so ripe so far.
the elephant ears all go in the basement and all look dead come spring but jump back to life. i don't know cissus discolor, if you're asking about the plant in the big basket it's a Persian Shield, now i want cissus discolor!
there are spaces between the stones i'm just letting things settle in, i'm thinking to use Leptinella Platts Black and yes it's a Meyer's Lemon there are 3 on that little clearance rack 2.50 tree, key lime is behind it and it's loaded
vojt, if i had a dollar for everytime someone told me the carex is dead i would be a rich man :) i know you're kidding
and Crizmo, the party is most any evening no invitation required just drop in anytime

Re: Jeff's patio is done!

jay, silberlocke is the only fir i have had success with it can take the heat/humidity here , frasier fir grows well about 45 minutes away at a considerably higher elevation but not here in the valley, people plant at christmas and they die for memorial day. the pice pungens variety is Theum and it's grafted on a standard by Bob Bullington and is at least 50 years old, it took a severe beating and torture during an ice storm and is still somewhat mis shapen and has "holes" in it. i like almost all the Ninebarks, deer won't eat them, tough and durable and lottsa color with no work. i do not rely on flowers for color as they come and go and some years are a complete failure but foliage colors always (almost) come through for me. the silberlocke has just finished it's 5th season here / it's another SLOW one and i don't know if Cham. Just Dandy or the Pagoda Hollies have grown a smidge since being planted. yep, i gots too much stuff. out the door to make a dollar, you guys have fun and make it a GREAT day!

Re: Jeff's patio is done!

diane you are the FIRST person to recognize and call by name the Silberlocke fir and it's a great plant. i do have a gentsch white hemlock as well as pendula, nana gracilis, cole's prostrate, sherwoods compact, jervis and lewissii. you should plant a Picea orientalis aurea 'Skylands', it's beautiful all year and especially in spring flush. it's SLOW and skinny. and if you are ever in asheville nc or smoky mountains DO let me know and i will expect you here for dinner. we do have some pretty good gardens in the area and i have flooded Michelle with photos . leftovers, sometimes i have to plan for leftovers to get what i want :) that farfugium is new for me and i had to pay RETAIL, it nearly killed me to do that

Re: Jeff's patio is done!

thx yardmom, my place is always last on the list and i plant many leftovers here and plant/watch/grow new plants to see how they perform before using in clients gardens. a total hodge podge on the entire property

Re: Jeff's patio is done!

Michelle, the stone is local and came from near Natural Tunnel State Park. the stoneyard was GLAD to get rid of it as the pieces were too large and nobody wanted to work with it. many are 5 x 6 ft and about 4" thick,,,,HEAVY. you are welcome anytime for a Beergarita (those drinks are low class but ever so refreshing in summer) and we will watch the honeysuckle and virginia creeper climb those upright posts. a stonemason friend is coming to seal the stones with something to give them a richer color

Re: Deb & Ray's garden in Illinois

another great space with a garden shed that looks better than the house i live in! i'm glad you pointed out the railway station or else i would have missed that. fun!

Re: Bob's slope-side garden in Connecticut

absolutely beautiful, Bob. full of happy plants and is that a weeping larch i spy? and nary a nibble on any of the hostas what few i have here now look like doilies. beautiful garden and LOTS of work for 12 years

Re: Diane's garden in Illinois, revisited

rained out,,,,,,,again so i'm taking another look see here. Diane you rock! and your garden is groovy too. if i happened to drive down a street and see a front yard planting like yours,,, i would stop and introduce myself just so i could see your garden. anyone with a front yard like that has to be welcoming and FUN to visit with. gardeners usually are . envious of your beeches seems borers get to them here before i know it

Re: Diane's garden in Illinois, revisited

great space, Diane, and full of many of my favorite things. send more photos and DO inundate Michelle's Inbox

Re: Visitors in May's garden in British Columbia

gloriaj i don't really do anything for the chicago hardy fig. i do mulch heavily with pine straw in fall well up onto the tree because i normally have freezeback but they rebound quickly and bear on new wood. last year no freezeback so right now they are all about 10 ft tall well branched and loaded. i have had only 3 or 4 ripen so far but once they start they all ripen quickly. we just eat them fresh off the tree or sometimes slice into halves, top with gruyere and put under the broiler to toast the cheese. delicious anyway you eat them. we have never had enough to make preserves

Re: John's garden in New Jersey, revisited

great garden, John, i will dive into your blog this weekend while it rains,,,,,,,,,,,,,again. i think here at home and in other gardens i have enjoyed various Joe Pye varieties more than any other plant, especially Little Joe as it withstood the constant downpours and all the others got beaten into weird configurations. looks like you've conquered your deer swarms, clay soil and high water table because everything looks great. do you grow Calycanthus? deer proof and smells delicious for at least 2 months

Re: Visitors in May's garden in British Columbia

may, my figs are LOADED this year and i check them everyday waiting for them to ripen. not sure how i would react if i lost them all to a thief in the night. fresh figs are not a common occurrence here in upper east tennessee, chicago hardy being the only variety i have had any success with at all

Re: Does anyone know what these 3 plants are?

i think they are probably all Echeverria of some variety, there are gajillions of varieties but maybe that will point you in the right google image direction. i'm sure there is someone who views this page who is well versed with these plantsand can most likely tell you the exact variety

Re: Visitors in May's garden in British Columbia

love to see wildlife in OTHER peoples gardens :)

Re: what is this

looks like Persicaria to me , i don't know the variety, i grow Red Dragon here . it's a cool plant whatever it is . some can be invasive or at the very least "rampant" . if not persicaria i'm sure someone here will know it and i would be happy to know exactly what it is

Re: Sally's garden in Maryland, up front!

bee1nine, where do you garden? and when am i going to see your garden?!?!?!? i always look forward to your comments and i'm sure your space is snazzy. you probably won't see this question as it's late so i'll probably ask again tomorrow,,,,,,i'm relentless

Re: Sally's garden in Maryland, up front!

jethro tull coreopsis is a new one for me. maybe it drowned,,,,,,,,,so much for Aqualung. so many things have just rotted away here this season

Re: Sally's garden in Maryland, up front!

sally, i STILL like the stones along the driveway for mulch retention and i have been a "landscaper" for 30 years. i still have not used cheapo gravel to maximize profit but i have used stones for water diversion, gravel of all types for walkways. i am sure there are landscapers out there would do that BUT your space is immaculate and i more than certain that you used a reliable, honest and knowledgeable landscape/garden designer it just shows. labor does not necessarily go down using gravel (it's not so cheapo) as it has to be groomed and positioned many times by hand . i try to grit my teeth and not comment on such negative remarks concerning gravel, photography, planters/urns (who gives a rip which is the correct term) it really impinges upon ones garden feature and yours have all been stunning and perfectly executed. not sure what the problem is for some people that professionals are used in some of the garden installations. in my experience i have always had a close collaboration with my clients to achieve what they need and want and to install something i can be proud of. treated lumber would definitely look cheapo, belgian blocks and concrete blocks will divert water down the driveway but the stones will allow it to seep into the bed without washouts. ok, enough of a rant, i apologize Sally but i had to say something concerning the constant harping on the use of gravel. those comments are reliable, always the same and never edifying. i agree that all gardens we have seen in Maryland are wonderful. i have spent LOTS of time in the ellicott city area primarily on Manor Lane . i'm old so i do remember when Colombia was a farm. your entire property is spectacular

Re: Sally's garden in Maryland, up front!

i love everything about this transformation. the plant selection for 4 season structure/color, the bed shapes, the attention to detail, the stones along the driveway for mulch retention,,,everything . i also took a refresher stroll through the backyard and it's just as snazzy! one question, you listed Pulmonaria as a reliable plant,,, how do you do it?!?!? i plant it , it falters then just disappears. i can not get it to last more than a season and it's on a decline from the 2nd day of planting. AND you got to develop a beautiful view for yourself across the street. now THAT is a very good thing

Re: My pot,

the indoor plant is definitely ZiZi ,Zamioculcas zamiifolia

the second maybe is a Clerodendron variety?

Re: Bridgewater Village Store, 2013

they aren't catching on here so i might just have to send this link to every downtown business that i can. it's my missionary work

Re: Renata's garden in Connecticut

cwheat, i'm thinking your spell check had it right with all fresco, i would be having every meal there

Re: WIN a copy of Victoria: The Seductress from Longwood Gardens!

turnips, as much as i want this book (i will just buy it) i HOPE you win! i read your other comments and i like you already.

Re: Bridgewater Village Store, 2013

i wish more businesses took this idea to heart and did something. it does so much and everyone enjoys it even if they take it for granted. we have ONE business here in town that plants extensively and changes out with the seasons and even have a "cotton field" in one area. most of the time, however, the businesses plant 2 pots by the entry door the first of May and by mid May or Memorial day it's nothing but skeleton plants. thanks Maywood Gardens even if i'm far south of you.

Re: Renata's garden in Connecticut

all very inviting and i would love to have a meal in the garden! i like all the mix of plants in your selections and i'm always a big fan of using tropicals and various palms in the personal areas of a garden. i've searched for years for an urn just like yours to use as a fountain,,, no luck yet finding one i could afford. i'm a cheapskate. great job!

Re: A Tree with Big Green Ball Fruits

they are not rare here but they are not common either. i do know that cattle can choke on them so farmers are wary of their presence near pasture

Re: A Tree with Big Green Ball Fruits

looks like a Hedgeapple to me,,,,,,,,,Maclura pomifera,,,,, osage orange

Re: not sure what these are found them in an old paket

the one is a sunflower and the others look to me like they could be blackberry lily (Belamcanda)

Re: What the heck is this thing?

a five leaf clover? you're the luckiest person in the world! :)

Re: Linda's garden in Washington, Day 2

ok, i need a personal guided tour of this beautiful space with plenty of time for questions. i keep seeing plants i'm not familiar with and with each turn of the head another spectacular view. today's photos are just as good as yesterdays

Re: Linda's garden in Washington, Day 1

Linda, i'm GLAD you got your camera out! such a nice, full, lush space and chock full of healthy and interesting plant choices. i love it all

Re: Jon's sculptural lawn in Ohio, revisited

i wasn't trying to bash eyegarden i just almost never get any suggestions after hearing that too much lawn thing. nobody ever gives options and jon with that list,,,,,,,,you're gonna have to move! and i hear there is $425 million up for grabs tonight :)

Re: WIN a copy of Victoria: The Seductress from Longwood Gardens!

I enjoy and WANT all horticultural books but this one holds special interest for me. I have seen this plant growing wild in the Amazonas and was blown away as it is THE plant for exotica,,, at least for me. Not a lot out there to read about it other than general descriptions. I doubt that I will ever be able to grow them here in the Smoky Mountains but I still want to know about this Queen of the Jungle Rivers.

Re: Jon's sculptural lawn in Ohio, revisited

ok, i had to go back and find the foot,,, missed it the first time.
eyegarden, i would be interested in a list of the more environmentally friendly options. i often hear that but i rarely if ever am given any information as to the alternatives

Re: Jon's sculptural lawn in Ohio, revisited

i'm so glad to see this lawn this morning in a summer shot. i still have the snowy one saved from it's feature earlier this year. if you have a mental disorder it's ok, i'm sure you're the most popular guy in the neighborhood!

Re: 1 Book, 5 Questions with Billy Goodnick

i am rolling here after reading your favorite sentence. i live in a late 40's cape cod and everything is lush and fully planted BUT on the east side porch i do have a cactus collection. not sure how it came about but it's here. yes, i'm a plant hoarder and feel the need to have 3 of everything

Re: can anyone tell me what kind of shrub this is?

you beat me to it, Crizmo! i agree

Re: Not sure what this is??

i had never seen patchouli before this is a new one for me.

Re: Barbara and Denis's collaboration in Connecticut

i NEED that rhino in a bed of Miscanthus

Re: Barbara and Denis's collaboration in Connecticut

fun! and i love it all after viewing the website this morning my favorites are the Dancer on a Sphere and any/all of the giraffes. Michelle, i would have stopped the first time i passed by.the greyhound is very cool too but the truth, i love them all. now i have to spend time looking at plants in this sculpture garden. thanks!

Re: Help! I don't know what these plants are!

that second one kinda looks like Northern Sea Oats just beginning to flower, Chasmanthium latifolium. bamboo flowers do not look like that and if it does flower it's gonna die

Re: Bought it for $1 at lowes

looks like coleus to me as well but i'm wrong quite often :)

Re: What is this plant?

no clue where you are but it's hardy here in zone 6b IF it's well drained in winter

Re: Victoria's garden in Indiana

wait a minute, i only now "figgered out" that wittyone and victoria is the same person! so nice to see your garden and it is a great one. my experience with gravel and/or pebble walkways is that if one addresses the water issue prior to installation there won't be a problem. that's just my experience over the past 40 years and i haven't had a problem with it yet mulch , however, can and will float

Re: Victoria's garden in Indiana

so right , Crizmo, a garden takes lots of work, plants and TIME to fill in and develop roots and legs. don't be so sure at 62 that you can't give the attention i have a 91 year old client who gets ahead of me sometimes she is a firecracker

Re: Victoria's garden in Indiana

great space and garden . my favorite,,, the bed to the right of the walkway with the coneflowers, don't trim it. i LIKE it a lot the way it is and the potting shed area is another favorite. the part i enjoyed the most,,,,,reading your photo captions, i would love to visit the garden just for your descriptions and history of each bed. great structures your husband has built. i need him, Darwin Anderson and Rob here in tennessee for about a month for their carpentry skills! great job and i like the plant swap event idea

Re: Nancy's daylilies in Wisconsin....LOTS of daylilies!

hard work, dedication and lottsa good organizational skills. i'm amazed and i could feel your excitement reading your words. can't imagine having 30,000 of anything much less all that color at the same time. my g'mom always said: "we have to garden as if we will live forever" and i think the gpod people are proving her right

Re: Scottish sunshine

i am rolling here reading your description of total immersion in the sea but the photos are beautiful! i want that lighthouse lens badly. for what? i have no idea but i want it

Re: That's Not My Name

living in the south would push you right over the edge, there are many many "sweet taytuhs" around here

Re: Michelle's garden in Connecticut, Day 2

tractor that's a GREAT idea about pavers over the old asphalt. i would have been focused on new surfaces and would have ripped it right out without ever having thought of that. 2 heads are always better than 1 but 3 sometimes causes conflict :) thanks, i'm going to file that for future reference. a real time, back and moneysaver

Re: Michelle's garden in Connecticut, Day 2

i just noticed the flowers on the unknown/cheap vine. could it be Mandevilla boliviensis? i was busy looking at the coleus cuttings and missed the white flowers

Re: Michelle's garden in Connecticut, Day 2

today is just as good if not better than yesterday's photos. a family yard/garden and i love it all, the plants, the structures, the family history in the garden and especially your daughter watering. i always love seeing children in a garden most of all in a strawberry patch, they are in heaven. question: do you have problems with the sweet autumn clematis coming up randomly thruout the garden? i like the leaf and flower of that vine but i fight it all summer long. i'm also glad to know that like me you buy things on occasion that are cheap and pretty with NO clue what they are!

Re: Michelle's garden in Connecticut, Day 1

michelle, i think we all know you don't need any pointers! i always enjoy august as the month when each and every plant is screaming "look at me" we work our bacooties off all year and august is the month of wild abandon before winding down for fall. it all looks GREAT and i expect to see Rob with an ETSY site selling chairs and dragonflies! i'm also proud of me for saying "bacootie" instead of using my usual vocabulary.

Re: More containers from Jeff in Tennessee

and brian, i almost didn't see your question i normally don't go back and look at past features i just happened to do that today. email me at gardenguy37642@gmail.com always room for a fellow garden geek :)

Re: More containers from Jeff in Tennessee

briandowns, i search for pots/containers at end of season to have on hand the following spring but some are sort of pricey even at that time. ESPECIALLY the copper ones, they are several hundred dollars each sooooooo i don't have any of those at my house! :) the stoneware large pots that can stay outside all year are pricey all the time altho believe it or not i did get some this year at walmart of all places for $39.95 that were retailing other places for well over $200 just gotta keep your eyes open for a deal.

Re: Michelle's garden in Connecticut, Day 1

i LIKE jungles! all looks great to me and with this years rains in the east everything grew especially full and fast. dragonfly spoons, who woulda thunk it

Re: Not sure if this is a weed or something else

POKEWEED get it out before the berries get ripe or the birds will plant them everywhere for you........get the root and it's usually large

Re: whats this plant called?

i'm thinking Verbena, , i see the very tip of a leaf but i'm pretty sure it's verbena

Re: Is this a tree, bush or weed

maybe it is yellowwood but in 30 years in the business i have never even once encountered a yellow wood seedling

Re: Tatyana's garden in Washington State, revisited, Day 2

another day of great photos of a great garden. i'm sure you spend LOTS of time working in the garden but gardeners generally don't view it as "work". great job and i love it all

Re: Tatyana's garden in Washington State, revisited, Day 1

all beautiful and full as i would expect no less from someone who has BLUE poppies! and i gotta say , , , those are THE most elegant cucumbers i have ever seen anywhere. i have redneck cukes growing on discarded grills from old screen doors :(

Re: More containers from Jeff in Tennessee

the only pineapples i ever see in the market are from Costa Rica

Re: More containers from Jeff in Tennessee

has anyone grown Begonia luxurians? that's on my plant lust list but i know nothing about it. photos are great but we all know how catalogs can be. just curious as to anyone else's success with that plant

Re: More containers from Jeff in Tennessee

may that is Salvia Black and Blue and it is hardy here in zone 6b. and the pineapple,,,,i'm a cheater, i buy them with fruit already set otherwise it takes a LONG time we did containers for a pool area one year with coconuts and the tree just jumps right out of the coconut they were very cool but i have not been able to get them for a couple of years now. i have had raccoons eat the pineapples when they begin to ripen and they ARE delicious,,,pineapples not the raccoons. i do so so many pots every year and digicams have saved my life it's easy to keep a record of who got what each season so i don't duplicate or repeat at others clients homes and i do drive my supplier kind of nuts with requests. he let me down this year as i could not get any Texas Sage! and with this years constant monsoons i did have some succulent planters to rot.

Re: More containers from Jeff in Tennessee

what a surprise to find this here today. yes, i send Michelle A LOT of photos and i'm thankful that a few are up to her standards to use. most of these containers i did but a few were done by the homeowner on a property we maintain but she LOVES doing her containers and i think she does a great job. the forced crape myrtle in the bonsai pot was photographed last year but it has set bud and should begin flowering again soon for 2013. thanks Michelle, it's fun to share garden stuff with other gardeners

Re: The biggest 'Sungold' ever?

well, i'm LATE. very cool vegetable garden and the best part, it grabs peoples attention and makes them think about growing stuff. maybe they think "i can't do that but i can plant some things in my yard" . tractor1 and cwheat,,,i am covered up in cucumbers and bell peppers and tomatoes, wish you were more near and you would find bags of produce on your front steps

Re: Jeff's containers in Tennessee

bee1nine yes i have added more cacti and succulents and i keep adding more of everything. it's really outta control! the largest ones have outgrown my abilities to overwinter so i'm giving them to a local school with a pretty good horticulture program for use in their lobby planters. the LARGE golden barrel, the pachypodium, Dioon, all the Zamia and anything else i can pawn off on them i just don't have room for the big stuff . i planted the hardier of the Agave outside last weekend buthad to build raised areas and really work the soil to provide fast drainage or else they would rot this winter. yes, i'm crazy

Re: Jeff's containers in Tennessee

bobby2c the red flowering plant is Begonia boliviensis, i have had it for years. in fall i cut off the top and put in the basement and drag it out in the spring and it regrows, i have a stump in the pot from which it emerges. i think it would be hardy a bit further south i'm in 6b. i saw it growing everywhere in the andes of peru and bolivia and it gets pretty cold at that elevation. the yellow shrimp plant i have never tried to root, , i just buy new ones each year. i like immediate gratification. i have had problems trying to winter over with whitefly but outside,,,,,,no problem. where in TX? i lived for a year in san angelo way out west

Re: Jeff's containers in Tennessee

may, i will admit that the banana in the copper urn got WAY bigger than we anticipated. the client selected that particular plant for the urns (there are 2 matching ones) and wanted them by the front door. 2 weeks ago i got a text from her saying: help i'm trapped by bananas and can't get out of the house. so we moved the deck urns to the door and the banana urns to the deck. i also lost a sizeable Dioon in a windstorm, the wind caught it and just sailed it away, no clue where it is and just today i was helping a client search for rhododendron that were washed away in our sudden deluge last week. almost 6 inches of rain in an hour, it was and still is a mess

Re: Jeff's containers in Tennessee

tractor1 you must have been a southern boy in a previous life, crape myrtles are EVERYWHERE thruout the south . Heptacodium might work for you it's sort of a crape myrtle for the north , lots of white flowers in august, fragrant, great peeling white bark,,, i use those too when i can find them available

Re: Jeff's containers in Tennessee

tractor1 that powderpuff flower behind the shrimp plant is a crape myrtle and you're right, it won't make it that far north.

Re: Jeff's containers in Tennessee

vojt, it's trained on a braided standard and i am afraid whenever anyone sneezes that it's going to snap off but i do have it on a steel rod just in cast. Justicia brandgeeana and the hummingbirds LOVE it, flowers until frost unfailingly

Re: Jeff's containers in Tennessee

brainbear, the dark leaved plant is Colocasia Kona Koffee, we save those from year to year in the cellar and drag them out in spring for another years work. they can get quite LARGE so i used a small 2nd year bulb in that container. the copper pots were bought locally through Westfield Herbary i'll ask Pam where she got them and if they are still available.
meander1, you always get a preview as i share WAY too many photographs

Re: Jeff's containers in Tennessee

thanks dirtgirl! i swamped Michelle with photos as we do well over 100 containers for clients each spring, switching some out mid summer and switching many many out with evergreens for winter. i get the leftovers at my house but sometimes you have to PLAN for what you want leftover! the leafy black pot no longer exists, it's chard and various lettuce varieties and ihave eaten it all and yes it's a bowling ball. by Halloween i have the most colorful compost bin in the state

Re: Mary's garden in upstate New York

mary, trust me i was in NO way maligning your garden nor your abilities but you know how "plant geeks" are along with botanists we will argue / debate until death about minute differences in plant varieties. i have had and still have plants here i either had mis identified and was corrected as well as plants i have NO idea what they are. i usually call those by the names of the people who gave them to me and eventually someone shows up who can tell me what they are. it's all in good fun . i have spent many many summers in the Finger Lakes at grandparents and your panorama brings back a lot of memories altho they had no garden they had lots of cows and grapes and i had to work!

Re: Mary's garden in upstate New York

you have an amazing garden and it's all beautiful but i'm kinda with jbsgarden on the vine. that is definitely boston ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata) not Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) both are related, both are deciduous, both are brilliant red in fall and both are tenacious. boston ivy has a simple leaf, virginia creeper has a compound leaf. it's not a big deal in the grand scheme because your garden is wonderful but if people want to find that vine for their place (and they will) they need to know it is P. tricuspidata and i have both growing here

Re: Big yellow "daisy type" flower - anyone know what it is?

put me on the mail order list when you have some of those plants ready to go

Re: Mary's garden in upstate New York

great garden! wisteria is beautiful but i'm too slow/lazy to keep up with the maintenance here. i can't keep up with it

Re: Big yellow "daisy type" flower - anyone know what it is?

my money is with Crizmo but if i get there first,,,,,,,,,it's mine!

Re: Butchart Gardens, Day 3

cherry these containers are nice BUT i much prefer YOUR container and basket plantings. no comparison

Re: Kong dog toy looking white plant bulb

that's a new one for me! i'm glad to know what this is even if it wasn't my post. thanks ellie maye

Re: Cherry's visit to Butchart Gardens, Day 1

butchart is always amazing to see in person and in photos but after marians yesterday and butchart today,,,,,,,,,,,,,,i gots LOTS of work to do here at home!

Re: Pull Poison Ivy the Safe Way

i'm so lucky to be not allergic to poison ivy. i can pull it all day and not get the slightest rash. my help , however, can walk by it and break out so guess who always gets to remove the ivy

Re: is this a groundcover or a weed?

i think it's some sort of purslane and it is tasty and it is good for you!

Re: Marian's garden in Idaho

still admiring the photos and i have renamed the chicken house, it's Cluckingham Palace

Re: Marian's garden in Idaho

that's not a home garden it's a resort! and i want to live in the chicken house. absolutely beautiful , Marian, a spectacular and monumental garden project. i even love the winter photos and i'm not a winter person. you have created a truly wonderful space

Re: Bill's 2-in-1 garden in Pennsylvania

Je suis en retard pour les photos, mais il ya un beau jardin! J'aime particulièrement le Crocosmia avec lis derrière et pivoines sont toujours belle. i'm SURE my french is terrible after all these years but your garden is lyrical!

Re: Kong dog toy looking white plant bulb

some variety of Oxalis tuber? there are soooooo many different ones

Re: Kathleen and Don's garden in Pennsylvania

michelle is right,,,,,,,,dreamlike. sort of like that film "the secret garden" when you pass thru the gate and suddenly color everywhere. i don't imagine you get much time to use those swings with the garden chores you have to keep up with, great garden

Re: Lori's garden in Colorado, revisited

i hope people are not unhappy with revisits because i really like comparing previous seasons and seeing the changes and growth/performance in the garden.

Re: Lori's garden in Colorado, revisited

for it being dry Colorado it certainly is lush and full. all beautiful and LOTS of work to make it so.

Re: Jeff's building a patio!

thanks, wGardens, you're welcome to check it out in person should you ever be in the smoky mountains. my favorite plants change from season to season but i do have some that i simply can't live without. contact me thru my near dead blog that i never update because i have no time. you can find the address in my profile, just click my name and you'll find it
have fun!
j

Re: Peonies in Clare's garden in New Jersey

absolutely beautiful and yes i took the garden tour of previous posts. i can imagine it does take every spare minute but man what a pay off. i can almost smell the peonies as i look at the photos

Re: Jeff's building a patio!

gramaval they have not been cut that's exactly the way they look, they are mounted on an axle and spin for cultivation. rusty sunflowers
tractor you're 150% correct about the smokes but some days when things go haywire i would smoke crack if i had it! not really but i do need to give them up. and you mentioned southwest colors of the flagstone, they were brought over from southwest virginia a stones throw from here and came from very near Natural Tunnel state park. the monkey puzzles are excruciatingly slow and very prehistoric looking , the coast redwoods gain height very quickly but i don't think i'll be re routing my driveway through the tree for at least another 2,000 years. your experience with the bogged down tractor sounds like one of my days!

Re: Jeff's building a patio!

sorry, the monkey puzzles came from Greer Gardens

Re: Jeff's building a patio!

Schatzi, i do know Far Reaches Farm and ordered Berberis jamesiana from them this year, i still can't believe i bought a barberry but this one is very cool. also ordered Gunnera and wingthorn rose from gossler farms. i often lust over everything at Cistus Nursery and Dig. gossler farms cured my fear of mail order plants, the gunnera and monkey puzzle trees were LARGE 3 gallon plants i was very surprised as i was expecting small qt pots of something. of course, i was attacked by the monkey puzzles when i took them out of their shipping sleeves

Re: Jeff's building a patio!

nurserynotnordstrom it was placed there because my next project is to tear off that awful screen porch and expand/rebuild with the patio being just off the west side of the new porch. if you're doing the patio yourself get ready for some work. i always sub those projects out on jobs because i am slow and i need someone who knows what they are doing and can do it fast. the excavation for the gravel base took awhile so now i have a "berm" to figure out something for, moving tons of gravel and raking smooth, decomposed granite for a firm base, then the flagstones sliding them off the truck on ramps and rolling the big ones into place on 4" pipes, then sand and river pebbles and polymeric sand in the joints. next i think i will recreate the pyramids of Giza in the west lawn

Re: Jeff's building a patio!

May the round thingamabobs are old "tiki torch" poles that were going to be tossed by a client, the ceramic balls were also found items. now if i had your sauna! i know i have too much "stuff" and i keep dragging it home but i can get by with it here and call it all a research project for future use on jobsites :) thanks and i keep returning to look at your garden photos regularly

Re: Jeff's building a patio!

come on down, annek and a 6pack would be welcome. the huge caladium is actually Colocasia Antiquorum Illustrus and they are prolific AND thirsty, the pig is an old weather vane. we made a fountain awhile back by standing an old tractor disc upright and it turned out great/nobody ever knows it's actually a farm implement. i'm one hour from asheville nc (great town) one hour from biltmore house and about an hour from gatlinburg/smoky mt. national park AND Dollywood! :)

Re: Jeff's building a patio!

i LOVE danger garden and she is the reason my credit cards melt ordering from those oregon nurseries!

Re: Jeff's building a patio!

no clue what to do with the leg but i never throw anything away. i think i might be featured on Hoarders soon.
Harry Lauder,,,,,,,i had a green leafed one that the japanese beetles loved and finally removed it for that reason. this red one they don't seem to like but it suckers from below the graft too so that's a regular job.

Re: Jeff's building a patio!

yard mom, it's not really a pergola so much as a climbing support, it's going only along the outside perimeter of the stones to give an open "wall" along one side to make the patio feel more snug and sort of a separate room from the rest of the yard. with this rain and backlog of work i don't know when that structure will be finished

Re: Jeff's building a patio!

pattyspencer, the star showers is variegated and much less vigorous than standard virginia creeper. i don't expect problems with it,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,yet. 2 margaritas and pruning shears and it will be surgically removed :)

Re: Jeff's building a patio!

more rain all weekend so no pergola and the stones have not been finished,,, maybenext weekend. michelle, i read so much and visit so many gardens and surf online that i can not take credit for the solar changelier completely because i honestly do not know if i saw that somewhere else or not. i think i must have because i'm not that clever

Re: Is this a tree, bush or weed

looks like Ash seedlings to me. cutting them off just makes them branch it won't kill them. dig them out and get the roots or it becomes more established and more and more difficult to remove

Re: Beth's garden in Maryland, revisited

that would be who mentioned Becca, i was going back and forth between features and got them confused. no matter, i'm glad Becca is still sharing her garden with you

Re: Beth's garden in Maryland, revisited

meander1 just because it's a holiday does not give you the freedom to sleep in :) where are you ?!?!?

Re: Beth's garden in Maryland, revisited

all beautiful and i compared the previous visit with todays feature. hard work and lots of it is paying big dividends. my favorite pics are always the ones where the dogs or cats photobomb the shot :) i have a "thing" for old houses and i get over the fever of wanting to start over in one and then i see something like this and the itch starts again to move and start anew. a garden is never finished so we must garden as if we will live forever

Re: Revisiting Katie's garden in Ohio, Day 2

katie, perhaps we should take up falconry as well as gardening

Re: Revisiting Katie's garden in Ohio, Day 2

my rabbit population plummeted with the arrival of red tail hawks,,, they always leave 2 / food insurance i guess

Re: Revisiting Katie's garden in Ohio, Day 2

katie, i use PlantSkydd all the time . it's EPA exempt as it's only dried blood, mineral oil. the only caveat i have ever read says to keep the dogs away until it's dried because they LIKE it. it can also be used on food crops but i'm not sure i would want to use it on vegetables . it's REALLY REALLY foul smelling stuff! the big problem would be for the dog to get it on it's fur and carry that smell inside the house. not sure you could ever get it out of upholstery or carpeting

Re: Revisiting Katie's garden in Ohio, Day 2

what in the world is your secret for having NO slugs? and i sense another gpod meeting / daniela and katie

Re: Revisiting Katie's garden in Ohio, Day 2

i'm always jealous of those who can host hosta,,,,,,,,dukeofargy, i keep looking for chickens! katie do you have chickens?

Re: Gardens and Cake

ok, i came back here for dessert. i visited Stroma's tumblr again and JamesAS you should be very proud she is an artist with the bakery.

Re: Katie's garden in Ohio, revisited

tomato/ tomahto bottom line, i want to have drinks on that patio surrounded by all that flora

Re: Katie's garden in Ohio, revisited

lush and beautiful as always and all those hostas! i think the rabbits drowned here with all the rain but i do have slugs the size of boxcars

Re: LOVE IT or HATE IT?

no, meander, my hobby is thorn removal

Re: Gardens and Cake

ok, a white grape

Re: Gardens and Cake

sultanas are a mystery to me as well. my g'mom called her impatiens sultanas. google searches, math, not sure i can make this cake! :)

Re: Gardens and Cake

i made the mistake of visiting stromabakes, my god. i'm drooling here

Re: LOVE IT or HATE IT?

wow, who knew this would draw so many comments?!?!? now i'm gonna go plant my name on the back bank with crimson pygmy barberries

Re: Another of Jeff's gardens in Tennessee

thanks, Jay! and so true,,,,,,,not everyone is a gardener. if that were the case i would be OUT OF BUSINESS and if you have kids you need a lawn or else spend all your free time screaming for them to stay out of the beds. i have grassy areas, i hesitate to call them lawn areas because i do not now nor will i ever strive to have a golf course lawn. i do have weeds and clover and i'm happy to have them as they are green

Re: LOVE IT or HATE IT?

i just read the reasoning behind the planting originally and understand but i'm still not crazy about it

Re: What is this plant? Please help!

pretty sure the first one is Salvia nemerosa the second looks to be Hypericum of some sort

Re: Need this at the new house! Please Help!

canna,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,do not know the variety but it's easily googled

Re: LOVE IT or HATE IT?

i don't hate it but i don't love it either. it doesn't excite me , i would rather have spent the money, time and labor on something more interactive or visually stimulating.

Re: Another of Jeff's gardens in Tennessee

ok, i can die happy now,, , Jane Eliz likes my garden work! and we all know her garden so i'm flattered.
LauraAllen there are LOTS of bare feet in that grass and you could stop by anytime and be welcome. This family is great and Gracie the yellow Lab is especially loving

Re: Another of Jeff's gardens in Tennessee

grrrrrrr, dappled willow NOT dapply willows,,,,Salix integra 'Hakuro Nishiki'

Re: Another of Jeff's gardens in Tennessee

tractor1 those twin trees are Crape Myrtle that we keep limbed up in tree form. the property is i think less than 5 acres but most of it is above the GIANT retaining walls to the top of the ridge,,, it's the wilderness and used by the boys and their friends, the view from up there is great. one can always see into Virginia and through Wadlow Gap toward Hiltons where the country music Carter Family hails from
everyone else,,, those vase shape willowy shrubs are indeed Dapply Willow (nishiki something or other) and you're right about trimming them which i did just after the photos. you trim and run to get out of their way, i'm sure they are now wooly again.
briandowns you're right as well, it's NOT easy to garden for someone else but all my clients are great and pretty much give me free rein, , once you know a family and their needs and likes it's not so difficult. we garden 32 properties and each one is different , my personal garden always is last on the list but i do try to keep it in shape. everyone feel free to come help :) i'll make the Beergaritas for AFTER the work is finished and for anyone nearby, 4 July it's open door here at home and you're all invited no work required

Re: Another of Jeff's gardens in Tennessee

brian, i did NOT mean to be snippy at all but i guess i was, too early in the morning. i've sent michelle naturalistic photos, flowery gardens, we work with all kinds. i call myself a gardener rather than a landscaper,,,big difference, this planting suits this client perfectly for now with their schedule and there are LOTS of pool parties for elementary and middle school kids. meander was right, the mother grew up on a farm in Iowa and has a small vegetable garden behind the pool house and does containers for now but as the boys leave the nest she will definitely be doing more personal things. everything at that house is BIG so no matter what we plant or do it looks small and will for a number of seasons. i enjoy and have fun with all different sites and it's a pretty good deal to get paid to spend other people's money doing what i love to do. rain stopped i'm out the door to make a dollar which lately seems to be my profit margin

Re: Another of Jeff's gardens in Tennessee

Cotoneaster parneyi on the trellis

Re: Another of Jeff's gardens in Tennessee

same for me, bee1nine but we do what works for the client and at this point in time this is what was needed until the kids are grown and out the door

Re: Another of Jeff's gardens in Tennessee

thank you briandowns. the family is busy busy busy and they also spend many hours with friends, family and LOTS of children there at the pool so they are relaxed relaxed relaxed. i submitted these photos only to show a different aspect to solving a need for a client. everyone is different and has different needs and desires for their space. not an energy suck at all an no fear of being called a slacker, everyones life is different

Re: Another of Jeff's gardens in Tennessee

quick note as i do not want to mislead,,,, i did not build those walls, the contractor who built the house built them. plants=i can do,,,,,,,,,,building the walls of jericho=i can not

Re: Mystery tree needs a name

i think it's some type of Sorbus (mountain ash) maybe taht will head you in the right direction

Re: Help! What are these?!

Crizmo, you are so punny

Re: Gardens and Cake

that millpond garden and view down the stream, wow. i was proud of my Ligularia until i saw that one. idyllic and i want to live there. antonio can bring the cake,,, i'll supply the coffee (tennessee hillbilly here don't know much about tea)

Re: Giant Leafy Plant

those are pokeweeds, check the photo previously submitted and you see the giant roots they have. cutting them down will do nothing as they will return with a vengeance. they have long chains of flowers which then become purple berries that stain everything, birds love them and you will be blessed with bazillions of them next year. dig the root out or dare i say it,,,,,,roundup kills them fast

Re: Help! What are these?!

i agree with JonMoss, here in east tennessee it's a noxious weed and will overtake a bed fairly quickly with those running underground stems

Re: A new season in May's garden in British Columbia

i LOVE everything about May's garden this time as well as the other features. the deer barriers are a visual part of the garden as well as functional my favorite part,,,,,,,,,,,the cedar sauna! i expect Frodo Baggins to open the door and invite me in . nothing cool came with my property just stuff to get rid of . GREAT garden , May!

Re: Vignettes in Pauline's garden in California

always a treat to see Pauline's garden especially on yet another rainy morning.

Re: Lovely but mystery plant looks tropical?

those appear to me to be Phormium flowers,,, no idea as to variety. without the flowers i wouldn't have had a clue as i'm accustomed to seeing Phormium with more stiffly upright leaves. BUT i could be wrong!

Re: Could it be an onion?

just razzing you, no offense intended

Re: Nancy's veggie garden in New York

that is THE coolest vegetable garden i have ever seen! almost with an "Incan" look :) i'm assuming those red discs around the tomatoes are the automators? i've never heard of those before. i'm envious of your set up there, i got my first cucumber of the season and bell peppers last night from my small and humble patch

Re: Kristin's no-lawn yard in Minnesota

i gotta chime in, yes, meadows rock and no turf lawns work for some BUT they don't work for everyone. i, for one, need grass i can't garden/bed out 2 acres ,if i had a no mow lawn i would be over run by ticks in high grass. i need turf areas for recreation, kids and grandkids to play on and in a rural area there are no parks on every block (there are no blocks) . i do not fertilize, i do not use any chemicals, i have a mix of bluegrass, fine fescue, LOTS of red and white clover and various weeds but they are green and i am happy to have them. i have butterflies,honeybees, bumble bees, dragon flies, damsel flies, birds out the wazoo of every kind, snakes, toads, bullfrogs in the ponds, squirrels, chipmunks and raccoon, opossum, deer, fox, and the occasional coyote passing through. i'm just saying that no lawn yards can't work everywhere but i applaud those for whom it works. i mow once a week at 3 inches and leave my clippings on the lawn and i also have LOTS of beds planted with several hundred species of ornamentals and oddball plants. great job, Kristin and i'm glad to see this alternative use of traditional turf areas but sometimes you gotta have grass

Re: Could it be an onion?

looks like milkweed to me too, Asclepias syriaca i think but it's the end of a long day so i could be way wrong. and Antonio, if those leaves look like onions, i need to take you to the Farmers Market :)

Re: A walk up the High Line in New York City

i just visited the High Line website and if i wasn't blown away before,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,i am now.

Re: 3 mystery plants in my garden...pls help!

i was gonna guess Physotegia of some variety but now i don't think the leaves are "toothy" enough

Re: A walk up the High Line in New York City

even though i am a bumpkin, i always enjoy seeing city gardens especially those public ones in what seems to be difficult if not impossible spaces.
carolinac, i think those are Eremus (foxtail lilies) i have tried those without success, i don't know why they won't flourish for me and they are not inexpensive and of course one wants a bunch of them.

Re: A garden meetup!

greenthumblonde, i forgot to say, you do not have to be shy at all pruning a smoke tree/bush. right after flowering just have at it you can even pollard them and they spring right back with more intense color, larger leaves and a full bushy presence. save that job for a frustrating day as it's a great way to relieve tension,,,,,,,,off with their heads!

Re: A garden meetup!

quick note to say how i have enjoyed reading all the comments. i wish ALL of you could come for a visit then we will go right down the road a couple of hours and visit Mike and Darwin! seriously, if anyone is traveling south i'm maybe 15 minutes from Interstate 81 and maybe 10 from Interstate 26 one hour from Asheville NC and Biltmore House. always always nice to spend time with a fellow gardener and plantaholic and at my place it's always Free Weeds Pick Your Own!
have fun!

Re: This is a HUGE plant growing in my back yard, it came from nowhere. Kinda fuzzy...

yep, it's a mulberry. they must be prolific this year. trust, you do not want that growing in your yard. fast growing, messy and i can't think of one thing going for it

Re: A garden meetup!

well, Mike, i also have carried the plants around that you brought to me placing in many spots before finally deciding where to put them! you're right about the stonework, Mark Hall is a magician with stone and stays really busy thruout upper east tennessee and western north carolina

Re: A garden meetup!

wandering gardener, the egg is not part of the built in island. it's a separate station and is in a rolling teakwood table giving more work space/serving area and can be rolled away from the action so to speak when in use. it throws off quite a bit of radiant heat and cooks for a long time. great for "big" stuff, burgers/steaks not so convenient

Re: A garden meetup!

tractor that fire thing is a fireplace and it's only for heat/ambience. there is, however, a newly finished outdoor cooking island just to the right of us. the stonemason was finishing it up when we were there visiting. grill, fridge, oven and a big green egg

Re: A garden meetup!

cwheat, the tall spiky thing on the porch by the column is a Pachypodium lammeri, i've only had it a few years. i got it for 1.00 at walmart about 6" tall and the cashier asked why i was buying a dead plant. the BIG cactus was on the other side of the porch a golden barrel that takes 4 people to move inside. i'm going to try to give it away this fall as it is just too big to handle anymore but i don't want to just throw it away

Re: What's this plant?

yep and here it is called Rattlesnake Plantain. i find it more in areas i have used shredded hardwood bark mulch than i do in the forest. flowers very very small

Re: A garden meetup!

what a surprise to find us featured today and it's a friday so you get to look at us both for three days! if mike and darwin had 1/2 as much fun as i did it was a super successful day. i really did enjoy meeting them both wish we could have gone to some other gardens but time and availability was at a premium. Meander is just as nice in person as here on gpod and darwin is the coolest ever and was understanding in that mike and i did do some talking! now i need to visit Meander Acres

Re: What is this plant?

mulberry

Re: Rose's garden in upstate New York

glad to know you're a Beatles fan! beware of the chachkas Tractor by the time i get everything where i want it,,,,,,,,,it's time to put it away for winter :( i do like your toys in the retaining wall idea

Re: Rose's garden in upstate New York

very nice in town garden! it shows your love of gardening and that of your family. AND your name is even Rose!!! if you have a daughter named Holly or Ivy, i'm gonna die :)

Re: Laura's garden in Connecticut

you have singlehandedly created a new wave of flamingo fans

Re: Laura's garden in Connecticut

all nice, i thought the bed was a gate until i read the caption, i'm jealous as always of your Pulmonaria but i gotta say, i LOVE the Flamingo resurrectii. did you feel like Indiana Jones when you dug it up? i would have

Re: woodland plant

i agree, shining bedstraw,,, that's anew one for me

Re: woodland plant

looks similar to Galium odoratum but mine has more than 6 leaves per whorl and woodruff leaves are bit more wide so i don't think it's that, and why am i commenting if i don't knwo what it is ?!?!?

Re: dont no

looks like some variety of Yucca gloriosa to me AND a finger!

Re: Michelle's garden in Connecticut

question. when you use soda bottles or packing peanuts do you not get ants living in there? i tried that and all i did was create an ant hotel

Re: Michelle's garden in Connecticut

one more comment and i'll shut up (i'm rained out today) i'm not a "viney person" because i have to fight them so much on the job and they are high maintenance to keep in shape BUT i do use and like Honeysuckle Peaches and Cream, here they only grow 6 to 8 ft. are evergreen, flower all summer till frost, fragrant and they flower on new wood so you can cut them way back for painting or whatever you need to do. hummingbirds love 'em

Re: Michelle's garden in Connecticut

i'm with Miyako, finally! just to put you at ease since you are Michelle and the leader of the gpod pack, we ALL check every minute detail of your entire garden! :) it's all great by the way

Re: Michelle's garden in Connecticut

i only now spotted the Gunnera in the white pot. i, too, took the plunge this year and it's still in a pot sitting in a washtub of standing water. the only way i can keep it wet enough. everyone tells me it's gonna die but so far so good, keep me posted on yours

Re: Michelle's garden in Connecticut

i love it all. very personal space with family touches and a living backyard. most welcoming. the found items are fun (i have no clue what that thing is) i also like watching pots fill in during the season, the Chihulyesque glass things that i want but am too cheap to buy for myself :) and my favorite caption,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,but not wisteria

Re: Kiah's garden in British Columbia, revisited

another great garden space from British Colombia, must be the gardeners heaven. you've done a great job and it all looks great! lush, full and healthy

Re: Maple??

trust , it's not a sweet gum. i have them everywhere here and they have much more sharply pointed and more deeply divided lobes

Re: Jane's garden in Maine, revisited

Jane, please send your daughter to tennessee, i have 6 tons of flagstone waiting for me in my back yard,,,,,,,i will make the lemonade. your garden really is DElightful, DElovely and DElicious

Re: Jane's garden in Maine, revisited

jane, i love your garden. this , to me, is a garden that is alive not only with plants but with the gardeners personality and personal "stamp" on every inch. very tasha tudoresque and i think it's great. favorite photos,,,,,the flagstone path underneath the crabapple and of course the garden shed. i wish i could come to your plant sale

Re: Michael's garden in Washington, Day 2

i KNEW today's photos would be a treat after seeing the preview feature yesterday. all the plants i love. get the coffee brewing, i'm coming over

Re: Michael's garden in Washington, Day 1

another great space! i love it all but especially like that screen fencing and the stone fountain. what is the plant just next to it? some Acanthus variety? and how do you control weeds in the rocks. great job with all you've done

Re: Agave harvardiana

great agave! they survive here in 6b but man do i have to make sure they have FAST drainage. i had an A. Victoria Reginae to flower in 2011 after having it in a container for 40 years no offsets so it was toast. bought another one to replace it maybe my grandson can see it flower

Re: Cherry's containers, Day 2

came back for another look now i want hanging baskets . these are chock full of plants / many of which i would never have thought of using in a hanging container. cherry, you have given me the courage to think outside the basket. these are amazing

Re: First-time gardener needs help IDing a few plants

to me, the first looks like mustard greens gone to seed
2nd i call it horsetail get it out or it will take the entire bed they have running underground stems
3rd looks to be some variety of lettuce that has bolted , go ahead and pull them all

Re: Cherry's containers, Day 2

now THOSE are some hanging baskets! better to call them hanging gardens, you have made a convert here as to hanging containers. yours are great

Re: Cherry's containers, Day 1

nice combos! to give you a full season of color and texture. the canna in the first photo is not past it's prime it just has some faded flowers hanging on as they always do.i see pot feet under almost all the pots except the one that had to be placed on a concrete seam in order to keep it level in keeping it out of the way of the garage door. i think they are all great,,,i'm with meander1 in asking about your coleus maintenance, i get weary of pinching off flowers then they get all woody/stringy and un attractive. great job! the irridescent blue lobelia is striking, i don't have much luck with it here in the heat of summer, maybe i love it to death with water, i dont' know

Re: Tatyana's blue poppies

i do not think one can compare cultivation of Papaver orientale with Meconopsis sheldonii (both of which are poppies). Meconopsis is almost mythlike or a fabled plant in most of this continent as to it's difficulty to cultivate. for me, doesn't matter if you grew from seed or bought plants it's an accomplishment to have them flower in your garden. you achieved the gold cup in having that happen.

Re: Does anyone know what this is?

Phytolacca,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,pokeweed. you had to do some digging to get the root out intact!

Re: Tatyana's blue poppies

good luck, bee1nine, mine always seem to germinate for Easter and die for Memorial Day. heat and blue poppies don't seem to mix

Re: Tatyana's blue poppies

beautiful clear blue. this is another plant i have killed more than a few times. they say the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. that pretty much hits the nail on the head with me and a number of plants. congratulations on your poppy success

Re: Diane's garden in Illinois

nice combos and colors! you're going to miss your sons help and that of his friend. after 26 years in business my main gripe is finding and keeping reliable/trustworthy help.

Re: What's this growing in my rhubarb? Is it poisonous?

i do not know the correct name of this weed but i do know it's not poison ivy or poison oak. those plants have 3 leaflet leaves. just pull it out while it's young it's not going to hurt you but you don't need or want it in your rhubarb

Re: Glenda's garden in Washington State

i can now see it's a table top but never in a million years would i have guessed that from the photo. i had convinced myself it was some rare ancient japanese rice grinding stone and that i could never have one,,,,,,now i know i can. tom torrens is great, isn't he? now i'll google barbara sanderson and see if she ships.

Re: Pretty (Practical?) Garden Hoses

i'm with you 200% susan749 . i have one 100ft hose that never kinks BUT it's so heavy and cumbersome i hate using it. i'm thinking these hoses go well with your Bentley lawn mower

Re: Glenda's garden in Washington State

P.S. i keep finding stuff in the photos. the Equiseteum, i love this plant. the stone "bird bath" by the bamboo and gate, the grindstone at the end of the path. is it a grindstone or something else

Re: Glenda's garden in Washington State

glenda, i love your space and your garden philosophy. i also am more about the foliage/structure of the plant and for me flowers are a bonus. questions: is that a tom torrens bell in the first photo? an upside down fern with the Enkianthus? i'm glad to see a fellow Sarracenia lover the tubes are great and the flowers look unearthly. it took a bit of "work" to get to gpod this morning but i'm glad i made the effort to see your garden. great job!

Re: I have been told it's an elephant ear??

every reference i have ever seen calls them Bears Breeches

Re: Wendy's garden in Virginia, Day 2

great garden. i especially like the pathway to the seating area. nice variety of plant material and all your colors work so well together. i always end up with some oddball combo that nags at me all summer

Re: May in Terie's garden in New York

it is a beautiful space. i'm jealous of the Brunnera, they sort of disappear here along with Pulmonaria :( grew up spending summers at grandparents in the Finger Lakes , beautiful area i seem to remember Watkins Glen and that aircraft museum in Hammondsport more than anything else.

Re: Live or let die?

well, you GOTTA let it grow and see what it is. i find many surprises in my compost pile where i have dumped pots

Re: Live or let die?

definitely not solomons seal . kinda looks like a Canna to me

Re: Strange Leaves, strange form, tree? shrub? HELP

mulberry

Re: Wendy's garden in Virginia, Day 1

i'm in zone 6b (so they say) and Loropetalum are everywhere here i haven't seen any more than 6 ft and they do defoliate some winters but come back fast in spring. very few grow the white one and i kinda like it

Re: Wendy's garden in Virginia, Day 1

great early spring garden! now with days nearing 90 these photos gave me a mental cool down before heading out. great job and you are fully realizing your garden dreams. i can see LOTS of work having been done there and gravel pathways are never an easy task but worth the effort after the job is done. took me a few years to accept that delphiniums were not gonna work here too! i have to kill something a few times before i surrender to not having the correct zone or growing conditions

Re: More from May's garden on Vancouver Island

came back this :am to see the rhodies again. i like knowing that your garden isn't always perfect in all areas, i love visiting a space where a "real gardener" lives , ongoing projects, research projects with new plants and horticultural experiments. mountain laurel must be a more northern plant for satisfactory growing as here it tends to get leggy and spindly/ maybe a bit too far south. one tip, May, that i have learned is that PlantSkyyd works wonders at keeping deer and rabbits at bay. it's a Canadian product and smells AWFUL when applied but after drying you won't smell it. lasts for 3 to 4 months and it is very effective but it is horrible upon first application

Re: More from May's garden on Vancouver Island

wow, looks like you could just eat them with a spoon! i think i must have President Roosevelt

Re: May's garden on Vancouver Island in British Columbia

GrannyMay, the reason i asked about Akebia control is that i have one property where it had run rampant for years completely obscuring a boxwood maze and 20 ft or so up Norway spruce. it was out of control when i took on the property and it's been an ongoing battle ever since. your photography looks pretty good to me no matter where the sun is! of course, you have great material to work with in your garden

Re: May's garden on Vancouver Island in British Columbia

beautiful space and a great place to start the day or to relax at the end of the day. favorite photo is the first one, also liked the one with the water hose in the background i, too, always seem to have a hose stretched somewhere. question: how do you control the Akebia? i have a property that has been overrun with it all through a boxwood garden and we can not eliminate it from that area. looking forward to your rhodies tomorrow

Re: Swearing for Gardeners: Holy @#$#%#!

no maple trees here BUT i do have elms,,, the messy flower fallings, then the seeds which turn into oatmeal when it rains and now billions of little seedlings everywhere and just as i get those gone the chestnut tree will be flowering,,,,,,,,stinky for a week then those long furry catkin things falling on everything then no more tree battles until fall. it's always somethin

Re: Maple??

sure looks like a maple to me and this is the season for them to appear everywhere

Re: Tim's side garden in Ohio, revisited

tim, before i head out for the day, it really is a great garden and i wish i could walk thru in person and get your commentary about it's creation. off topic, , but where is janetsfolly? isn't she an Ohio girl?

Re: Tim's side garden in Ohio, revisited

always fun to see Tim's place and his collection of plants.
i am, however, coveting that lady's slipper i have never successfully grown one to flower and it's an expensive quest!

Re: The evolution of Regina's roadside garden in Illinois

cwheat, your prayers are working my Gunnera is growing BUT it's still in a large pot sitting in a washtub of standing water those are some thirsty plants. regina's garden shows the space of a person who LOVES plants and LOVES to grow "stuff" sure all the neighbors and passersby love that fencerow

Re: The evolution of Regina's roadside garden in Illinois

great job and it's looking great! is that an 'Incrediball' Hydrangea? sure that additional 75 ft of property will fill up fast,,,,,the thrill of the hunt on plant expeditions. i'm betting at the garden centers you are "a woman with a mission" !

Re: I think I'm killing it!

that is a Clivia miniata and they are tough plants if you give them what they need. NO direct sun, a loose free draining coarse potting medium (they grow on the forest floor in litter) and it's better to keep them on the dry side rather than wet. they also seem to flower better when potbound. they do NOT like wet/soggy/heavy soil at all

Re: Gayle & Larry's garden in Illinois

i see nothing "commercialized" about this space AT ALL and not all asian influenced gardens have an obligatory koi pond and bridge and a booth for admission? i would pay , it's a great space that took much planning, thought and work for it's implementation. it's very easy to be condescending and many times just hateful with the security of being behind a keyboard far away. i have tried and i simply can not fathom the mindset of some people and their comments perhaps it's not the properties featured but "their eye" that is the problem
trashywoman i had a weeping larch here in east tennessee and it lived fine BUT the japanese beetles ate it back to hard wood in one day

Re: Gayle & Larry's garden in Illinois

i love this space, clean/ functional and each plant selected and placed perfectly. i wish i could do this at home but i'm a plant hoarder. beautiful garden and hardscapes

Re: Gail's garden in Oklahoma

great blog/photography too,,, i just checked it out. that mystery orchid is Bletilla striata i have them here as well as the white one and enjoy them both but they get frosted some years here. bookmarked the blog for further reading!

Re: Gail's garden in Oklahoma

great garden! i think i want to live in the garden house. always love to see children in a garden but an easter egg hunt would probably make me crazy :) i will say that the tulip photo is the BEST spring photo i have ever seen.

Re: Sue's garden in Ohio

all beautiful! i especially like that birdhouse with a face. i like anything with a face and the concrete sculpture man saves the heads that break off his statuary not sure what to do with them yet. great job with all you've done

Re: The Greatest Show on Earth - Chelsea Flower Show

i'm with you on that one but only if i can quit my day job and be tour director, i dont' really want to do anything i just want to travel and be paid for it :)

Re: I have been told it's an elephant ear??

that is Acanthus mollis,,,,,,,,,,,,Bears Breeches

Re: Michaele's garden in Tennessee, Day 2

this group of photos confirms what i said yesterday in that every time you turned your head another beautiful view . i like that feathery foliaged euphorbia too! that fresh limey green is one of my favorite colors to punch everything up

Re: Michaele's garden in Tennessee, Day 1

that is a great vision realized . sadly, my visions usually turn out to be mirages or hallucinations. things rarely perform up to my dreams.

Re: Michaele's garden in Tennessee, Day 1

not only is the garden incredible BUT she also makes "bird mansions" and her husband is pretty handy as well building gazebos, garden structures AND they are just so darn nice as well! we really kind of need a video feature of Meander Acres

Re: Michaele's garden in Tennessee, Day 1

glad to see these photos here this morning. Michaele has so many great things in her garden and this is not her only vision that has been realized /with every turn of the head another view is seen and appreciated . despite my being a green and growing guy i think my favorite pic is the horse in the snow. now what's for Day 2?

Re: Carla's garden in Connecticut, revisited

cwheat i love your garden and i love your commentary. you gotta be a lot fo fun in person......question,,, why are their tombstones in your garden and leaning against the fence?

Re: Carla's garden in Connecticut, revisited

my favorite foto is the unmown lawn , storybook

Re: Carla's garden in Connecticut, revisited

great garden/all beautiful and i re visited the prior posts and they are equally snazzy. i HOPE you open your garden gates in August because i want to see it in person

Re: Weed, Ivy, Tree or bush??

those are not ash leaves

Re: Kevin's garden in Washington, D.C.

another plant i have murdered several times is Euphorbia 'Bonfire' and i'm embarking on a mission of probable death for Gunnera

Re: Kevin's garden in Washington, D.C.

it's a blue salvia, i use them A LOT in containers as well as in the earth, i use Victoria Blue usually. i have killed the sumac as well ,,,,,,,,,,,,,more than once

Re: Kevin's garden in Washington, D.C.

what are the 3 staked items between the pokers and street on that lower level?

Re: Kevin's garden in Washington, D.C.

the shastas might draw the eyes first but then one is drawn in to examine/enjoy all the other stuff. i especially like that peony. a welcome sight in the middle of the city.
ok, everyone take to heart Michelle's invitation concerning the august confab. set aside some time and head to CT, you KNOW you want to!

Re: Wildflower or weed?

ok, maybe some sort of Pinellia?

Re: Wildflower or weed?

i only now saw the spike thing so it's NOT mayapple , i only looked at the leaf before

Re: Wildflower or weed?

mayapple maybe? i live in upper east tennessee

Re: Miyako's shady front-yard garden in Connecticut

gotta love all the "spring stuff" . always good to see virginia bluebells and trilliums since i can't grow those here at home

Re: Marilyn's visit to Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah

i always love seeing public gardens/displays in an urban setting having not been in SLC in probably 30 years i especially enjoyed seeing these "postcards" thx!

Re: Nancy's garden in Maryland

meander1 yes, i have used it for drainage and for that "gritty mix" for alpines and in trough gardens. i always mix extra perlite in the potting mix for tuberous begonias and other on the dry side things but never thought of it for voles,,,i'm gonna try it . it's cheap and i do love cheap

Re: Nancy's garden in Maryland

nancy, i read about volebloc and it is described as expanded slate particles. do you think that chicken grit would work as well? it is sharp granite grit that is fed to chickens and it is MUCH less expensive than vole bloc and can be gotten at any farm supply store. i'm thinking that any hard sharp particles would work the same . with your experience with vole bloc do you think chicken grit would be as effective since they are both just sharp rocks?

Re: Nancy's garden in Maryland

snazzy tulip display! what do you plant in summer after tulip season, just curious (ok, i'm nosy)
email arrived at 5:03 the universe is re aligned

Re: I don't think it is what it seems, please help.

looks like young Zelkova bark to me

Re: Spring at Chanticleer, Day 2: Containers & Combos

vojt, i am in container purgatory here right now getting everybody potted up this week,,,,,,come help and bring sheila schultz with you!

Re: Spring at Chanticleer, Day 2: Containers & Combos

beautiful again! is that grass planted in the hanging baskets?

Re: Rustic Arbour

too cool, looks like a chapel!

Re: Spring at Chanticleer, Day 1: Bulbs, Stone, and the Bulb Meadow

another beautiful "tour" i never get to experience public gardens/estates at their peak as i'm too busy in those times. i have seen Biltmore tulips with tight green buds or colorful petals on the earth, roses with green buds or after every stem has been deadheaded and drycleaned same with the azalea garden with a tangle of fallen flowers in the stems . strangely if you call the "color hotline" it's always a glorious day at Biltmore house please do come and enjoy :) and i do even if the color has passed it's prime

Re: Spring unfolds in Pauline's California garden

i love these photos with the shadows and different light levels it's like being there. i always look forward to pauline's garden and everything in it.
the missing emails don't bother me, i just save the previous days and enter that way, two more clicks no big deal. if that's my biggest issue of the day i'm VERY happy.

Re: Spring unfolds in Pauline's California garden

as soon as i saw the headline of Pauline's Garden i knew i was in for yet another treat and i wasn't disappointed. always beautiful and it always looks like acres and acres and acres , hard to believe it's only one.

Re: Jay's garden in North Carolina, revisited

jay, i came back to look at your photos again and looks like you could have an auction for those doors and make mucho mucho money! the entire property is beautiful and i enjoy all your photos and interactions with the commenters. the gravel pathways are perfect but you already know that! i'm one hour from asheville and wish i could do your open house on sunday but this time of year i have absolutely no free time please notify thru gpod if you have another one in the fall or anytime.

Re: Jay's garden in North Carolina, revisited

jay, i love your garden. i check your past features from time to time and i enjoy it each visit. i have a Skylands spruce about 12 ft tall and it's my favorite as well, new growth coming out and it looks like lime green christmas lights . those doors are amazing , sure when you found them it was like striking oil. all beautiful. i think i now need Geisha Gone Wild too, thank you for enabling my addiction :)

Re: Skip the Theme Parks -- Head for Orlando's Leu Gardens!

i have been to Orlando a bajillion times but i have NEVER heard of Leu Gardens,,,,,guess where i'm going the next trip to FLA. i'm kinda used to heat/humidity/mosquitoes so i can handle (i think) florida in summer. thanks for posting this unknown spot so i can check it out

Re: Spring at Winterthur, Day 2

all beautiful but my favorite pic? the last one/ the rock with the ivy well AND the benches, i covet the benches

Re: Spring at Winterthur, Day 1

i need to get out more! especially the gardens of the northeast

Re: Odd succulent taking over my lawn

Kalanchoe daigremontiana syn. Bryophyllum daigremontianum mother of millions, i can imagine it would be VERY aggressive in south florida. all parts are poisonous

Re: Spring at the Laurelwood Arboretum in New Jersey

well, i have Cedrus libani here but i don't have anorexic ones! now i think i must have one or three

Re: Spring at the Laurelwood Arboretum in New Jersey

these pictures are like "deja vu all over again" since those plants all flowered here a week or two ago. good to see them again. is that tall skinny evergreen a Chamacyparis nootkatensis variety? i have other weeping/thin varieties here but not that one. i love them in other gardens but in mine they always look like the way too skinny sister you just want to feed

Re: Victoria: Plant or Phenomenon?

i was fortunate enough to have seen these growing wild while in the amazonas of Peru. i don't know if they were native there or had been brought in but it's a surreal vision to see these still waters with giant discs floating on the surface. the plants there were not so perfect as these in conservatory gardens but it's mind blowing to see such plants in their native environs. of course, many many things in the amazonas are "wild and jungley", by the time i returned to Lima i looked "wild and jungley" as well. it's not a comfortable place to travel it's a great adventure and you feel like a real explorer while there.

Re: Beth's garden in Iowa, Day 4--Containers & Ornaments

beth i've enjoyed your garden all week AND your thoughtful replies to everyones questions. your place is filled with beautiful and fun things from the street to the back fence and i like it all. i, too, have a frog prince but mine is big, cheap and ugly! yours is MUCH better / understated and fun. the kids here love my big ugly frog,,,,,,my wife not so much :) have fun this growing season it's gonna be here soon, , , frost/freeze warning here tonight so it's drag things inside or cover them up and hope the weatherman is wrong wrong wrong

Re: Beth's garden in Iowa, Day 3--Attracting wildlife

looking at your birds nest, i once found a hummingbirds nest during fall clean up. i still have it in its own glass box as i doubt i'll ever find another one. tiny tiny and made of lichens and what looks to be spiderwebs

Re: "Polish On, Polish Off"

i have a few "pseudo bonsai" that i play with but of course they are NOTHING like the ones in the photo. mine truly are tortured trees in tiny pots BUT it's my exotic outfit that i really enjoy :)

Re: Beth's garden in Iowa, Day 3--Attracting wildlife

more beautiful photos and i'm jealous of all except maybe the groundhog since they eat my tomatoes here as high as they can reach! also i am envious of your natural pest controls,, i have plenty of birds but still have slugs i think i need more frogs, toads and snakes. not sure how the snake idea is gonna fly with my wife but might spice up the garden walks a lot!

Re: Beth's garden in Iowa, Day 2--Bird Garden, Big Garden, & Fairy Tale Garden

i always wonder when i see these beautiful perennial plantings "but what about winter" THEN i read where you talked about 2 to 3 ft of snow ,,,,,,answered my question,,, all is white! we don't get snow that often and it doesn't last long . different climate/different techniques.

Re: Beth's garden in Iowa, Day 2--Bird Garden, Big Garden, & Fairy Tale Garden

beautiful beautiful again. i wish i could walk thru and experience it first hand. yes, west texas/ san angelo not so far from lubbock. i don't use pesticides either and have lots of birds but i still have slugs. i will keep luring more and more birds in and see how that goes. favorite photo,,,,,,dusk from the screen porch. early morning and late evening best times of the day because that's the ONLY time a gardener gets to sit down!

Re: Beth's garden in Iowa, Day 1

wow, beautifully lush and exuberant/ all the things i don't do well with here, hosta, bleeding heart and caladium. i lived in west texas once and your place is a BIG difference from Texas! your place is a true show stopper. i read about the deer fence but what do you do about slugs?

Re: Spring in Jeff's garden in Tennessee

cwheat, you crack me up. yep, i'll be famous in 150 years . S. argentea is a very cool plant. i do use it in containers with purple phormium or burgundy cordyline some dangly thing and whatever good color/flower i have . i also never met a Carex i didn't like even the brown ones that everyone says " are those dead?" i stumbled on these plants last week they called Rhino horns, i still don't know the real name but they are cylindrical and very pointy ,,, architectural . no clue how i'm gonna use them but they only had 5 so , of course, i had to buy them all. maybe i'll put those rhino horns on mystery plant, , sure someone will identify them for me

Re: found an unknown plant by the mailbox

how did i not remember that?!?!? :)

Re: Spring in Jeff's garden in Tennessee

carla, that is employee pilferage ! and i'm proud of you :) it would have been trimmed off by the maintenance crew anyway and lost so it's good that you took it, i think. but i will watch you very closely should you visit my garden

Re: Spring in Jeff's garden in Tennessee

a client just emailed me an article about impatiens downy mildew , total crop failure here last year nobody's did well , and the article said it could be worse this year . does anyone have any additional information about this?

Re: Spring in Jeff's garden in Tennessee

texas traveler is slow and mounding, , it's in full flower now. i have had Oklahoma in the past but they tend to migrate to clients gardens , Lavender Twist is another weeping redbud. .. Flying Dragon is very cool in winter with no leaves, twisty branches, recurved thorns and hanging full of those fuzzy oranges

Re: Spring in Jeff's garden in Tennessee

cwheat, it's right behind the S. argentea, that very small spiny green thing. it is now a towering 7" tall

Re: Spring in Jeff's garden in Tennessee

annek, that post is from a jobsite. we have been working for 20 years now at Rotherwood, an 1830 plantation house that was about to fall until the current owner bought it. she didn't like the rusted things so i brought the fence posts home with me, along with rusted pickets, gates and everything else. the carved stone fountain base she didn't want either so guess what,,,,,it's here along with all the rusted iron vent grates and the iron chimney covers. i bring everything home. i have grave stones here, cannon balls , deer skulls all found on jobsites. we once dug up a prosthetic leg, i still dont' know how one could lose that!
cwheat, you are the FIRST one who has like my Salvia, i can't get anyone excited about it, you've seen my garden in a previous post, i had the daylilies you said you would help me divide. i'm still waiting for you to show up with a shovel and spade :) and angelina sedum is one of my favorites, great spring/summer color and even better color in winter. i have to keep trimming it off the steps and step stones but every small piece will grow, just drop it where you want it and it's good

Re: Spring in Jeff's garden in Tennessee

i understand wittyone, after 27 years of marriage my wife refers to anything taller than her as a tree and anything shorter as a bush :) she does, however, like the garden and gives great advice and suggestions and does plant 2 beds under the dogwoods herself. also, she can spot a weed from 40 yards away. she does give me a lot of grief about my "prize" monkey puzzle tree that i paid a small fortune for and it arrived in an envelope saying expect mature height of 150 ft in 1,000 years. every trip thru the yard she says i need to watch it because it's "just taking over"
2" of growth in 2 years

Re: Spring in Jeff's garden in Tennessee

tractor if you liked the elm you should see the branching of the Parrotia, it's finally past puberty and maturing nicely, heavily branched and now starting to show bark texture/color

Re: Spring in Jeff's garden in Tennessee

tractor, thanks for all your kind words, i do appreciate it. the large multi trunked tree (in the photo with the S. argentea is an American Elm, i have 3 here that is the smallest and none show any evidence of disease. they are magnificent but messy. strangely, i do have deer pass through but i think they are so spooked after crossing the road they just run right on by, i have never lost anything to deer,,,,,,,,rabbits/voles another story. not sure of the hardiness of Flying Dragon, it has large recurved thorns so you can reach in easily it's coming out that is the problem. loaded with fuzzy oranges full of seeds, 1/2 the seeds will be curly the other half straight. pouring rain, just got home from nursery shopping. i am officially penniless but have great plants. the tripod is hanging with a sempervivum orb but the birds keep stealing my chickens! the insulators are on top because birds would sit there and i had bird mess orb. they can't perch on the insulators and they have plenty of other places to sit. the pug rules the roost and will point out every dandelion and stand there until i dig it out ,,, she must have been a Setter in a previous life. her name, Rosita Conchita Maria Gonzales de la Piedra Jones,,,,,,we call her Rosie

Re: Spring in Jeff's garden in Tennessee

meander1 that's why i labeled the weeping cherry as NOT grafted. if you could ever find one on it's own roots as opposed to grafted on those fence post trunks, , you won't have problems. every branch is weeping and you don't have those vertical suckers arising from below the graft. my only source for seedling weepers was Mr. Bullington, since his passing i have not found a reliable source. that cherry started out as maybe a 24 inch whip about 15 years ago, i would have to search my records for it's "birthday"

Re: Spring in Jeff's garden in Tennessee

i only garden about 1.5 acres give or take and there are lawns, i don't have the dollars or the time to garden it totally. those pics are a week old and everything has already changed. click gpod by state and you can see summer pics or there are pics on my pitiful little "blog" that i never seem to keep updated. amazing how fast things grow in one week in the spring

Re: what are these?

Cineraria? but i would need to see more leaf to be sure

Re: Julie's garden in British Columbia, Day 2

i had to come back and look again. today i gave the link to your garden to every client i visited telling them " you gotta see this place" . well, now they WANT a recreation but this is your personal space it can not be re created. it's a very very cool space. i'm still blown away

Re: Julie's garden in British Columbia, Day 2

yesterdays photos were great but today, i'm just blown away.
the bamboo fence, metal salmon spawning under that great bridge, a fish fence!with bubbles no less AND a door to hide a bare spot in the hedge. i love it ALL / is your name julie or Alice because i'm expecting to see a Cheshire cat in there somewhere. i love this backyard wonderland

Re: Anne's garden in Manitoba

125 frost free days, hard for me to imagine. i would stay up 24 hours a day just to get my horticulture fix for those other 240 days. your garden really is beautiful and i really am envious of those bergenia, here they look like a bad crop of collards they just won't work

Re: Julie's garden in British Columbia, Day 1

i just did a google image search for victoria,,,,,,are there any spots in that city that are not just spectacularly beautiful?

Re: Anne's garden in Manitoba

cwheat, i'm sitting here almost laughing with the vision of you "whipping" the hemlocks with a broom! but i have read that knocking them off they rarely can climb back on the tree. i was curious as to how far north the adelgids have migrated

Re: Julie's garden in British Columbia, Day 1

all that in four years. absolutely beautiful and i bet Terry is absolutely exhausted! you are lucky to have neighbors who share like that

Re: Anne's garden in Manitoba

tractor, do you not have wooly adelgids there?if so how do you control/eradicate them on hemlock. they are in a steep decline here . we have always had to fight spider mites on sheared hemlocks but adelgids have appeared in the last few years and it's becoming a real problem here now the emerald ash borer is moving in fast

Re: Anne's garden in Manitoba

lush/full and LOTS of color and i'm envious of your Bergenia here it kind of "melts" and never thrives. in a compressed growing season do things just spring forth and grow fast exploding with color to get everything done before frost? and a Hibiscus that far from Honolulu! can't imagine 3b i grumble about the cold in 6b,, what are your frost free dates?

Re: Susan's front yard makeover in Illinois

dang, i like your way of thinking. a friend always says: life is short and we're dead for a LONG time so go for it.

Re: Susan's front yard makeover in Illinois

susan, i like you already! i have had jap maples in bonsai pots for 30 years , , judicious drop pruning can keep them in hand for decades and they do not looked hacked at all but after seeing your backyard from last september YOU already know that! that is a beautiful back yard. i'm also glad the makeover bug caught on, you are a trendsetter for the neighborhood and it not only looks good to change things up it feels good to be surrounded by it. now i'm gonna go look at that back yard again,,, what time is happy hour

Re: Susan's front yard makeover in Illinois

tractor, what brand of solar lights? i've only ever had the cheap cheap ones and haven't been happy. i would be most interested in knowing what brand you have had success with.

Re: Susan's front yard makeover in Illinois

happily_gardening,,,coolest chick on the west coast :) and she is a snazzy nature photographer as well. incredible closeups of flowers and sometimes with pollen covered bees in there too. got to take those pics,,,,,,real slow like.
out the door, i'm gonna look at pavers , , i now want a new sidewalk, thank you Susan for making me spend money i don't have! it's 15 april after all

Re: Susan's front yard makeover in Illinois

Sheila Schultz,,,,,,plantaholics anonymous?!?!? i say no no no

Re: Susan's front yard makeover in Illinois

i don't get discouraged with parts of mine but i have considered bringing in a bulldozer and just removing big chunks

Re: Susan's front yard makeover in Illinois

cwheat i did not direct that comment at you at all. in fact, i had not even seen your comment. you give suggestions and those are almost always welcomed by anyone. edicts are different , at least to me. i just want people to be encouraged to garden MORE not throw up their hands and say why try ? nothing i do is right,,,,,,,,,,,which is never the case. you, cwheat, always have helpful suggestions and i've seen your garden photos and would welcome any comments you made concerning different ideas as to mine. i was only making a generalized observation,,,,,,,,,,and i did find your tomato suggestions and have them waiting to go in the earth now!

Re: Susan's front yard makeover in Illinois

quite frankly, i'm beginning to be amazed that anyone even shares their photos anymore what with the abundance of landscape police and what not. i always took this as a forum to share what we have done in the garden/landscape that makes us happy and of course we are proud of the end results or we wouldn't share it. this is not the review board for landscape architecture magazine and i dont' think many of us if any are qualified for that position. fine line between a tip such as vinca becoming invasive and outright ripping someones efforts to shreds

Re: Susan's front yard makeover in Illinois

i thought the same about the railings but ifyou look closely the new railings have rings just beneath the top rail. if the installation went as mine usually do not all components are ready at the same time. maybe the plantings and pavers , , lighting were in and waiting for the railings to be finished/delivered.

Re: Susan's front yard makeover in Illinois

that was a big but worthwhile step. i always go through nail biting and second guessing myself when comtemplating a major and expensive re do like the pavers. no second guessing here, it's perfect... your calycanthus seed are on the way Meander1

Re: Susan's front yard makeover in Illinois

nice job! i especially like the new treatment on the walkway/steps , really makes a statement and i think works perfectly with the entry door surround. looks great

Re: Garden Design Basics: A Battle Between Stuff and Space

thx for the reply and i have been doing much the same,,,,,,,what else can one do!?!?!? i, too, have turned down a few jobs because i just couldn't allow myself to do it and i for sure didn't want anyone to KNOW i did it. people are funny sometimes i just have to shake my head, smile and move along. i keep saying i'm going to write a book about my past 25 years in business but i would have to leave the state.
make it a great week and have fun!
j

Re: Garden Design Basics: A Battle Between Stuff and Space

i always read this blog but this is my first comment/question. i "get" the stuff/space ratio but tell me what can we do with a client who freely admits she likes stuff? i mean LOTS of stuff? i try to hold her back, i try to keep things clean but there is always more and more stuff. have you discovered the magic to controlling this behavior or do we just have to smile, grit our teeth , move forward and deposit their checks? thanks for this blog, i have learned alot and it's always fun

Re: what is this orchid variety

i think you're absolutely right! thanks so much!

Re: Nong's garden in Ohio, Day 2

i had connection issues this morning so only now getting to see the 'rest of the story'. i knew it would be full and colorful as before and i was right. sure you are smiling the entire time you are working in the garden. i think my favorite is the rose walk under the lath roofing but all are stunning. how do you control japanese beetles and blackspot on all those roses? that's a full time job in itself

Re: Nong's garden in Ohio, Day 1

"died and gone to Holland" now that is funny, i'm still chuckling here. thanks!

Re: Nong's garden in Ohio, Day 1

now that's lotsa color! walkways, bridges, color everywhere sure the kids think it's Chutes and Ladders and Candyland come to life. great fun for everybody and the result of alot of hard work. do you plant annuals in all the tulip beds after they finish?

Re: Gardening with kids at Green Chimneys Farm and School in New York

cwheat, i'm late with everything this year except lettuce and chard, i have those in large tall pots so the rabbits can't reach it. will start grazing next week . Mortgage Lifter and Cherokee Black are pretty good tomatoes too if you find those to try. i can put tomatoes in first week of May sometimes last week of april and Betty my greenhouse buddy grows them for me in 3 gallon pots so i can get a jumpstart . my goal is fresh tomatoes by the bucketfull by 4 july. you plant a lot of stuff both ornamental and edible, how do you find the time?

Re: Gardening with kids at Green Chimneys Farm and School in New York

gee, cwheat, after having a plastic supermarket tomato for dinner now i want a REAL tomato,,,,preferably a Brandywine, thanks for making me hungry! :)

Re: Gardening with kids at Green Chimneys Farm and School in New York

miyako, you are doing great things there at green chimneys. would be nice to visit and learn some of your techniques that could be used here in Tennessee. after reading your comment it makes me want to visit even more! you would be the best tour guide ever, i can already tell/// have fun!

Re: Gardening with kids at Green Chimneys Farm and School in New York

i really like all these first garden experience stories. that's another book for you Michelle after the GPOD volume is published. we were all very lucky to have been exposed and infected with the garden fever early on

Re: Magnolia Appeal

no clue, Antonio, but it is definitely a heartbreaking event here many years. now we are in the danger zone of frosts. with temps near 80 all week everything will pop out then you get a frost/freeze warning and the entire neighborhood looks like a ghost town with people putting sheets over everything they can

Re: Gardening with kids at Green Chimneys Farm and School in New York

that is a GREAT program at green chimneys. i don't think i've ever met a child who didn't like to get dirty and "grow stuff" and they get so excited when their crops grow and produce. i'm going to do that milk crate wall garden with my grandson and niece this weekend!
earliest memory of gardening? when i was 4 or 5 my neighbor, Thelma, would plant her flowers/ i would watch and the next day when she left for work off i would go with dixie cups to her yard. i would dig up all her newly planted flowers and pot them in my dixie cups and wait for her to return that day from work. she would then "buy" the flowers from me and PAY me to help her plant them. this happened everyday until the flowers were literally just worn out from handling. it's still a family joke that Thelma started me in the nursery business.

Re: Karen's no-lawn front yard in California

great job! so much nicer than grass and a foundation planting. you are not a rookie you are a natural

Re: Spring in Daniela's garden in Ohio

sorry you have tulip issues but i now understand why you treat them as annuals. disheartening / frustrating when that happens after waiting for them to emerge in the spring but with all your other successes i think the tulips as annuals is a small price. your place looks great and i can appreciate all the hard work that goes into it

Re: Spring in Daniela's garden in Ohio

doesn't the freshness and boldness of spring just get you going?!?! nice to see all that just outside your windows. i am curious as to why you have to treat tulips as annuals? my first experience with Fritillaria was to search and search for skunks in the garden until i realized it was the Frit all along. happy to see another season in your garden

Re: Barbara's shady circular garden in New York

rained out so i returned for another look and closer views of the plants. sadly, i don't have the conditions to grow many of those plants at home. i personally like gravel walkways, i like the feel and sound when i walk, raking it into pleasing designs and the unexpected volunteers that appear around the edges.

Re: Barbara's shady circular garden in New York

reading this again and the description of the soil preparation/creation is making me tired BUT it proves what i and others preach all the time about providing the proper conditions for plants to thrive and the end results of Barbaras garden shows that beautifully. so many people(but not FG readers! ) buy plants, chisel a hole in the earth, pop it in, give it a small drink upon planting and then wonder why it doesn't look like the photo tag . full , lush and thriving / again, beautiful work

Re: Barbara's shady circular garden in New York

beautiful, calm and restful but after all the work building that i would need a hammock instead of a bench. sorry, i don't believe the basically lazy description/ over extended i can relate but lazy, , never .

Re: Joanne's garden in Ohio

very nice! looks like "home", hand me down plants are that for a reason,,,,,,they perform. great job and i see the satisfaction/enjoyment you get from the garden. i especially like the moon window/lattice on the back porch

Re: Mystery Purple Beauty

Akebia quinata here in Tennessee can become invasive and very difficult to control

Re: honeysuckle/eucalyptus

Lonicera hirsuta? hairy honeysuckle, i'm kinda/sorta sure this is what it is

Re: Lori's garden in Utah, Day 2

what a project! beautiful / functional end results and now you have all those pockets to plant in. you need a chapter devoted to you in that Vertical Gardening book Michelle is giving away. i can appreciate the rock climber abilities you would need for planting / maintaining parts of this. great steps

Re: Lori's garden in Utah, Day 1

Michelle, no book winning for me unless photos of mud, washed out edges, missing mulch, various frozen plants and masses of Narcissus torulosa from wind/snow will create a winning entry.

Re: Lori's garden in Utah, Day 1

nice container plantings, i know what you mean about daily watering/ that is my daily planning time. once you have containers in a given spot it's just "not right" without them. i'm itching to get things growing here but not for another 3 weeks i'm thinking

Re: Magnolia Appeal

there is nothing like the sight of M. soulangeana in full flower but here many many years they are frozen as soon as they open/ still worth the gamble. i had never heard of M. dealbata after googling it looks very similar to our native M. macrophylla. not a common tree here but it is around. M. grandiflora is a beloved tree here with people loving it in flower and at Christmas, the floral fragrance almost overwhelming but a true link to the South, thanks!

Re: Kim's garden in Washington

do you have to take your fish in during winter? mine just kind of enter a suspended animation state and remain outside year round. now i'm curious

Re: Kim's garden in Washington

now THAT is technicolor! vibrant plants, lushly planted and FUN stuff thruout. i'm envious of the edges too mine look good maybe 3 days out of the season and taht's it. great job

Re: Stake it to the Limit

not sure what a hazel is but i usually have a ready supply of crape myrtle to use. sturdy yet flexible. everybody calls me cheap but Ruth, i will now start describing myself as frugal and practical,,,,,,,much better ring to it

Re: please help me with this one

ok, crizmo, you GOT me! i actually googled that viburnum as i had NEVER heard of it :)

Re: Another design by John in Virginia

very nice! loving the stone steps. when working with stone, for me, the most beautiful stone is the LAST one to be installed,,,,,,,,,,then i'm happy

Re: Our 2nd visit of the season to Pauline's garden in California

and WHERE is cwheat and should the authorities be notified?

Re: Our 2nd visit of the season to Pauline's garden in California

back home, frozen almost ,,,again. came to warm up in Pauline's garden. hard to imagine all that in one acre. i had tree ferns when i lived in carmel but they never looked that good. maybe too cold but probably i didn't know what i was doing. everything really is beautiful there,,, do you take in boarders? or do i have to become a squatter? and just take up residence?

Re: Our 2nd visit of the season to Pauline's garden in California

after DAYS of freezing , nasty weather at least with these photos i know it's spring somewhere! sadly, probably no Loropetalum flowers here this year. Irvin and Pauline how large is your garden? youhave an amazing collections of many many different plants, all beautiful.

Re: Kathy's garden in Connecticut

just read Kathy's fragrant plants article and i'm the same way. right now i'm still enjoying the Daphne but it changes with the season. i'm always searching fragrant plants and stick my nose in almost every flower in bloom (it's a running joke with the guys on the landscape crew) most times i'm rewarded with the scent but sometimes i make a mistake! not ALL flowers are pleasantly scented but the ones that are make up for the mistakes i make in the garden

Re: Red stems, burgundy/green shiny leaves.

peony? i see last years cut back stem at the base, , i would be more sure if i could see the entire "clump"

Re: Kathy's garden in Connecticut

trees, shrubs, perennials, grasses, quiet seating area AND a picket fence! you have it all / looks like a Fine Gardening feature!. i am impressed daily by everyones hard work and creativity . beautiful

Re: Finding the Best Rubber Mulch for Your Landscaping

i can see the benefits of this rubber mulch in a playground or walkways to keep a dry and not muddy walkway in a natural color but do you honestly think it "works" in a garden area?

Re: please help me with this one

ok, jon moss , as long as "one" of you keeps the grass sculpted it's all ok. i STILL don't know what this silhouette is

Re: blue bulb

i thought it had to be one or the other

Re: what is this plant

resembles some sort of Bromeliad to me but i'm not a tropical gardener so it's a guess at best

Re: blue bulb

could it be Scilla or Chinodoxa?

Re: Climbing plant...philodendron???

where do you live? and post a photo of the flower when fully opened please.

Re: More from Tricia's garden in Minnesota!

ancientgardener, you sound like my friend Margaret. she will be 91 in august and she gardens and has all her life. it's a different sort of garden now but i learn so much from her and she doesn't even realize she's teaching me anything. she just "does it". i read you were in western NY, i grew up with summer vacations to the Finger Lakes, , no clue if that is near you or not

Re: Spikey/Prickley Spider Plant?

http://www.houseplantguru.blogspot.com that girl i feel sure could identify this for you

Re: please help me with this one

jon moss are you mowjoe?

Re: Winter & spring mingle in Kathie's garden in Virginia

came home early, frozen ,,, i feel like one of those crocus now

Re: Winter & spring mingle in Kathie's garden in Virginia

i do like seeing crocus in the snow but i am glad the snow missed me here this week. Michelle, we have Arum here and i'm Zone 6b but anymore zones are kinda hit and miss alot of times

Re: please help me with this one

because it's driving me nuts :) i've looked at every branch i encounter and i'm still stumped

Re: Linda & Terry's garden in Ontario, revisited

beautiful results of MUCH HARD work

Re: please help me with this one

how can it be identified from a silhouette?

Re: Camellias in Pauline's garden in California

well, i just spent time checking out the 10 previous "HERE" features and all are great! i, too, am impressed with the growing from seed how long does it take from germination to flowering size? growing from seed i have patience everything else i usually want RIGHT NOW

Re: not sure what this is

looks like Angelwing begonia to me. there are SO SO many different varieties i could not tell you which one

Re: unknown plant/shrub

they root readily and air layer even more easily if you can't find one. i usually see them available at the big home improvement stores in spring. the green leafed varieties have impressive clusters of red berries that persist thru winter if you like that look

Re: unknown plant/shrub

Aucuba japonica 'Variegata' Gold Dust Aucuba,,,, tough as nails

Re: Jon's sculptural lawn in Ohio

you should see the google satellite view!

Re: what is this creeper

i NEVER get volunteers like that! gladly trade my pokeweed foryour cyclamen

Re: Identity discovered

why did i not know this!?!?!? i have them growing right here at home!

Re: Tree name?

hornbeam maybe? this is like "plant jeopardy"

Re: Tricia's garden in Minnesota, revisited

exactly Vojt, a cliffhanger, who shot JR?

Re: Tricia's garden in Minnesota, revisited

had i been on that garden tour last year i would still be in that yard. absolutely beautiful

Re: Jon's sculptural lawn in Ohio

video the creation as he does it while you're in the hot tub and post on youtube. we need a tutorial!
and buy that man a new lawnmower,,,,,,,,,,,,,he's famous now!!!!!

Re: Jon's sculptural lawn in Ohio

i wish i could have my lawn like this for easter,,,, it would drive the kids crazy

Re: Jon's sculptural lawn in Ohio

i wonder if Jon lives in a Yellow Submarine, Octopus Garden,,,,,,,,,i could go on and on . it really is fun,,,,,,jon, how long does it take to sculpt this?

Re: Jon's sculptural lawn in Ohio

now that is just too cool and fun! you could make crop circles in the off season.

Re: Visitors in Linda's garden in Texas

aren't pileated woodpeckers something else? must have been 50 turkeys on the jobsite when we arrived this :am, , , must be courting season i saw one with full fan and strutting :)

Re: Visitors in Linda's garden in Texas

the post this morning had me scouting for birds all day on the jobsite (as i was freezing) drove home by the river and noticed piles of sticks up in the trees. turns out they were blue heron nests i never knew until today and had never noticed it before. so thx Linda for making me more aware by sharing your birdshots.

Re: Visitors in Linda's garden in Texas

fine birding :) that gave me an early morning chuckle. birds are a fact of life in the garden, i see them scarfing down/up earthworms, snipping off emerging seedlings, pulling newly set sempervivums in a hanging moss ball and tossing them about and dive bombing red tail hawks. all good and i do encourage them. and trashywoman that "eyeliner" is sort of liz taylorlike in Cleopatra......btw bluebirds are nesting here!

Re: Visitors in Linda's garden in Texas

amazing photos and i agree with Michelle,,, that first one blows me away too! enjoyed your previous feature when we went "home" and will look forward to more... have fun!

Re: More from Dorothy's garden in Maryland

yardmom you might want to check out PlantSkydd for deer repellent, it lasts about 3 months after application and is VERY effective. smells horrible until it dries but man does it work well. i have a good friend in adelaide australia who is also a teacher/primary school principal and she ALWAYS has a big project when on school holidays. it's a running joke when we talk, so sharyn what are you building this term?!?!? have fun i'm sure your new garden will be spectacular

Re: More from Dorothy's garden in Maryland

off topic but i just took the dog out and did a walk thru
Daphne in full flower, Viburnum Spring Dawn and Prunus mume Peggy Clarke,,,it smells like spring everywhere and i can hear the grass growing, , i think we're gonna make it! winters are difficult

Re: More from Dorothy's garden in Maryland

just returned from a prospective client, they had a brick patio installed by a "professional" it does not compare to your beautiful patio. call me, i'll give you a job tomorrow! :)

Re: More from Dorothy's garden in Maryland

and greenthumblonde i thought i got up earlier than anybody in the country,,,,,,,,,,you beat me to it

Re: More from Dorothy's garden in Maryland

what a woman! i loved your first feature/photos and now i'm more than impressed. beautiful and it makes my knees and back hurt just thinking about all that work.

Re: small perennial clump

i'm seeing a tri lobed leaf rather than a "twinleaf" and more thick texture. H. nobilis obtusa? not trying to be difficult just trying to understand the distinction between the two. thx

Re: Pinterest, anyone?

cwheat, your comments always give me a boost, filled with energy and enthusiam. for some reason i had never seen your gpod features so i searched them out. great gardens and i examined each and every photo on all your features. your comments are always that 2nd cuppa coffee for me ! thx

Re: Pinterest, anyone?

glad you're back on track as spring is about to pounce upon us all

Re: small perennial clump

well they are very similar aren't they, who knew?!?!

Re: Is this a herb or a weed?

martjie, i have friends in Vryheid and oh how i would love to visit!

Re: Pinterest, anyone?

michelle, raining here now so i have been snooping around past gpod features and found your place! snazzy, beautiful, comforting and i remember the days i had a swing hanging from the tree. i do, however, wish your husband could hire out down here. i could keep him busy here at home for a long time. i never let lack of extra cash slow me down!!

Re: Springtime flowers in Nancy's garden in Oregon

oregengardengal, i worked in my garden all day yesterday (it hurts to even breathe today) searching for some signs of spring,,,,,,,i found a few but nothing that even remotely compares to your spring extravaganza so yes, i'm back this morning for another look. delicious garden photos

Re: Pinterest, anyone?

flu=no fun, feel better fast

Re: small perennial clump

looks like Hepatica nobilis to me

Re: Linda & Terry's garden in Ontario

ok, i had to come back for another visit. absolutely beautiful

Re: Springtime flowers in Nancy's garden in Oregon

have just come in from working in the yard, i was hoping to find a shadow of color after seeing nancy's garden. no such luck here. various winter weeds flowering but that's about it. had to come back here for additional hope and to know that it's spring somewhere

Re: Springtime flowers in Nancy's garden in Oregon

gives me hope for spring. all perfect just what i needed to see this morning

Re: Is this a herb or a weed?

i thought that was oregano now what is that plant resembling rosemary? i'm still stumped on that one.

Re: Silvery leaved plant resembling Rosemary

this plant has driven me nuts. i still have no idea what it is. you handle is good earth, that is the name of my garden design/maintenance business

Re: Dorothy's garden in Maryland

i had the same splitting to happen in a big snowstorm to a Seiryu japanese maple. makes me wary of planting anything with a branching habit of outstretched hands twig fingers catch a lot of snow. i am envious of Dorothy's clematis

Re: Is this a herb or a weed?

well, now i gotta go graze in the garden just to investigate!

Re: Rice worth its weight in gold

i'm fearful of all GMO's especially those RoundUp resistant crops. i have many friends in Peru and there is a big opposition there to any GMO's entering the country. they have such a diversity of corn crops there. a good bit of their food is unintentionally organic as there are more natural fertilizers (guano) available and much cheaper than chemical ones.

Re: Is this a herb or a weed?

i thought this was Oregano until i read the lemony smell/taste. now i'm stumped. i, too, would be interested in the ID of this plant. admittedly, my knowledge of herbs is "little to none"

Re: Dorothy's garden in Maryland

dorothy, i do like the forest pansy redbud/ flowers and leaf color and small size but i have had a problem with them splitting with our wet snows here no matter how i carefully prune hoping to prevent that. haveyou had that problem? how did you solve it or has anyone else experienced that. what to do?

Re: Dorothy's garden in Maryland

dry shade,,,,always difficult but that didn't seem to be a problem! great color and diversity. is your new garden also dry shade? or have you entered a brave new world.

Re: Fine Gardening on the Road!

if only Asheville NC i could actually cross the mountain for that

Re: Carol's garden in Michigan

looks like "home". the first photo gives me hope that spring is near (snowing here today,,,,,,again) wish we could grow fuchsia here but seems we buy at mothers day and by 4 july they have given up the ghost

Re: Linda & Terry's garden in Ontario

tractor1 i'm glad they work for you and you solved your problem. after you suggested them to me i put out a query to the garden ring i belong to locally and got 47 replies saying they had no success with them. maybe it's our soil, maybe it's these "hillbilly voles" i don't know. i have found no solution but can control them somewhat with bait station not accessible by other animals and old fashioned Victor mousetraps. i wish those spikes would work for me. the hawks cleared the rabbits out maybe i need owls for voles. i would welcome owls anytime

Re: Linda & Terry's garden in Ontario

i have battled voles for years and have tried everything on the market with limited control NOT success. now i try to find active trails/holes and set a plain old mousetrap at the hole. i don't even bait it, they come out of the hole and trip the trap. i admit it's a stab in the dark as i am surrounded by acres of pasture and hay . someone told me to get a couple of jack russell terriers but i don't think i would have a lawn left. i would love to find the final solution to the vole problem here

Re: Linda & Terry's garden in Ontario

it is beautiful and i can understand full well the need for an irrigation system but tell me how do you keep the english ivy under control? on properties here that have it by the time we finish trimming it,,,,,,,,it's time to start again with the clippers

Re: Linda & Terry's garden in Ontario

maybe that's a weeping beech, it's early and i'm not sure of anything

Re: Linda & Terry's garden in Ontario

and yet another beautiful site, parklike. in the third photo down directly across from the japanese maple across the path, what is that shrub? it almost looks like Loropetalum but i didn't think they grew that far north. great job and the dogs seem to love it too
meander1: gardenguy37642@gmail.com i know you will see this early :)

Re: Sarah's library children's garden in Maine

all my "clicks" work perfectly as they always have

Re: Sarah's library children's garden in Maine

JaneEliz was featured a short while back, winter garden and with a beautiful narrative to her feature. has a plant sale in may, Plants for Peace, i thought if you didn't know her,,,you should! seems like a good person to know. your Achillea story explains why the ONLY Achillea i have that will stand up grows at the edge of my burn pile in the back acre. it always performs with NO water, No care and burned over 3 times each year. have fun! and your garden there is beautiful

Re: Sarah's library children's garden in Maine

very nice , lush and full of color! i love when a perennial garden first emerges in spring (breakfast), then all filled in and setting bud for flowers (lunch), and finally full of flower/color providing a full on gluttonous feast. i remember JaneEliz (also in Brunswick) saying she had no deer in her area, , do you know her? you said Achillea was difficult to grow there but yours look great. here by the time they flower mine are floppy and lazing around in every direction.

Re: what is this plant called?

i never would have thought Asclepias . i'll have to search for some for this coming season. zone 6b

Re: My Confederate Rose Bush.

that is not a Rose of Sharon (Althea) it is Hibiscus mutabilis commonly called Confederate Rose and planted thruout the south

Re: Silvery green/purple plant with furry leaves?

it most likely is some variety of Begonia. i was googling and saw a photo, eureka!, clicked and it was a photo linking back to this post :)

Re: plant name

i'm sticking with Alocasia. that segmented runner with root nodes beginning is the give away i think

Re: plant name

i think this is a young Alocasia, i can see segmented "runners" that you have staked up. my A. Antiquorum Illustris has these same runners but it has a black leaf. pretty sure that's what you have but a green one

Re: Office Plant

Dracaena marginata most likely. very tough plant / don't overwater and you'll be fine. now my neck hurts from looking at the photo :)

Re: More from Christine's garden on Long Island

Christine,
i know it has to be disheartening to see things die or suffer especially those we have grown for a number of years. i have on occasion after storms said to myself, i quit/ i'm not gonna do it anymore. the next day i'm out there digging holes again. after seeing all the photos of your garden and all the work it has taken i kinda feel for your garden helper because i am not sure anyone could keep up with you!

Re: More from Christine's garden on Long Island

fine with me and happy to share. set the exchange up thru Michelle and we will co ordinate from there. you're right, it's gonna be crazy soon but i can make time to give you a garden tour of the area if you want and have the time

Re: More from Christine's garden on Long Island

i know next to nothing about Long Island gardening but tractor1 must be right about it's abilities to purge itself of salt. i have visited the Hamptons area a couple of times and it is lush, perfectly manicured and beautiful. i think the key there is the use of money as fertilizer

Re: More from Christine's garden on Long Island

meander1, this is off topic of christines wonderful garden but i am going to be dividing those daylilies toward end of month, would be happy to share some of the red ones with you if i knew how to get them to you

Re: More from Christine's garden on Long Island

steepdrive, after years of battles and mostly losing to deer, i have found that PlantSkydd and GreenScreen are very effective and they last a long time. the plantskydd smells AWFUL the first day but they won't come near it, the GreenScreen is also very effective BUT if you have raccoons it can be a problem, they seem to like to eat it. and no i am not a paid spokesperson for these products it's just that they have saved me a lot of aggravation over the years

Re: The Boring Post About Houseplants

i gotta say, the name of your blog first caught my attention! i have now read all your past blogs and will keep up to date with new ones. they always give me a chuckle and a new insight as we've "all been there" at one time or another
have fun!
j

Re: More from Christine's garden on Long Island

i wouldn't know which way to look first if i walked through your garden all stunning. i've never dealt with flooding or salt spray but many plants can be more resilient than we think so i'm hoping for the best for you and your garden.

Re: Christine's bayside garden in New York

christine,
i am in awe of what you have created and i'm glad you put a face on this garden. i have just finished reading every word on your website and examined each photo there. all beautiful and i fully appreciate all the work and thought you have invested in your garden but,,,,,,,,,,how in the world do you make the time ?!?!? can't wait to see the next chapter in the morning. thanks for sharing your hidden harbor

Re: Christine's bayside garden in New York

Michelle, have them call me, i talk so much many times people agree to my ideas just to shut me up

Re: Christine's bayside garden in New York

wittyone, nobody who grows stuff is a failure. everybody deals with time/space constraints and then there is the weather (hostas are coleslaw after a hailstorm), birds diligently cutting off seedlings or pulling them up, rabbits pruning lower branches or entire plants with no regard the list goes on and on. i'm betting your garden stands up and shines. send in your photos,,,,,,i double dawg dare ya! :)

Re: Christine's bayside garden in New York

all these beautiful gardens and the stories of their creation. Michelle, you should publish a book, call it Fifty Shades of Green

Re: Christine's bayside garden in New York

beautiful , lush and full. i agree, we need to see more. i had to smile when i read: The garden is never perfect, as I am getting lazier in my old age. a true gardeners statement. great garden and do send more photos, please

Re: Gorgeous out of the gate

whenever i see a garden gate i just gotta see what's on the other side. it's too tempting and i can never resist temptation

Re: Jane's garden in Maine

wish i could go to the plant sale. maybe the bus tour will stop on the way to sheila's in Newfoundland. i love meeting the people who have created their gardens

Re: Jane's garden in Maine

i'm loving these black/white photos of the snow garden and the family history of the plantings. i do not get regular snowfall here and it doesn't last long when i do but the winter personalities of the plants and beds are always a welcome sight,,,,,,,,,,,,for awhile

Re: What plant is this?

looks like Yucca rostrata to me

Re: Daniela's garden in Ohio

i'm guessing that orange azalea is 'Gibraltar' . it's readily available and it does flower in May. just guessing

Re: Daniela's garden in Ohio

beautiful ! the result of a lot of work and water (mostly sweat). what kind of mulch do you use and i saw no evidence of a fence,,, do you not have deer issues there?

Re: Mystery plant with spiny stem.

that is a sawbriar,,,,Smilax glauca, i have been attacked by them many many times. they grow from a large woody underground stem/bulbous thing and that must be removed or it will always come back,,,,,,fast

Re: Calvin's garden in Washington state

beautiful! calming and a perfect place to comtemplate, rejuvenate and regenerate. i think it's very difficult to create a realistically natural garden and you nailed it. i had to read the description twice before i caught the rainy season comment! tim burton? i think you just got the Oscar for set decoration

Re: Sheila's garden in Newfoundland and Labrador, Day 2

hard to believe it's a weekend garden. looks like a 24/7 garden to me !

Re: Sheila's garden in Newfoundland and Labrador, Day 2

tractor1 not sure a moose stew would be the first thing that came to my mind :) no moose in the smoky mountains other than Bullwinkle

Re: Sheila's garden in Newfoundland and Labrador, Day 2

happily_gardening,, show this to your husband and he will have that patch of lawn removed by monday.
after this newfoundland garden i'm curious about the western edge of the continent and would be interested in seeing Alaska gardens

Re: Sheila's garden in Newfoundland and Labrador, Day 2

speaking of moose/animals in the garden. i used to chat with an estate gardener in India. i was ranting and railing about deer damage and he replied: i wish for deer,,, we have elephants
so whenever i have damage i try to remember that it could be worse.
rain stopped, sun out, i gotta get to work, i am not an independently wealthy garden editor/party planner/tour guide operator :) sorry, Michelle, i couldn't resist

Re: Sheila's garden in Newfoundland and Labrador, Day 2

not so fortunate for us in August when everything is wilted and sweltering and frying in the summer sun. then we are wishing for fresh ocean breezes that you enjoy. i'm still wondering what i would do with a moose in the garden. that is one beautiful vegetable garden

Re: Sheila's garden in Newfoundland and Labrador, Day 2

blown away,,,,,,,,,,,,again.

Re: Sheila's garden in Newfoundland & Labrador, Day 1

i'm thinking that potluck at michelles needs to be upgraded to a bus tour. sounds like a moneymaker as i'm sure it would sell out. another project for Michelle

Re: Sheila's garden in Newfoundland & Labrador, Day 1

not sure how i would react if i found moose in my garden. i did just read that st johns is rated the 4th most colorful city in the world. so much i did not know about newfoundland and you are so right about the connection between gardeners. i have used baby powder to keep rabbits out of lettuce and spinach but with each rain or heavy dew you have to re apply

Re: Sheila's garden in Newfoundland & Labrador, Day 1

beautiful, idyllic and a storybook quality, , the storybooks just leave out the part about all the work it takes.
you aren't nosy meander1 i think your inner yankee is fading and you are becoming a true southern girl. can't wait to see the vegetable garden tomorrow

Re: More from Betsy's townhouse garden in New York

me too, Vojt, jealous, envious and i covet this garden. i think there is a warning about this but i can't not feel these things. i'm just amazed

Re: More from Betsy's townhouse garden in New York

i agree meander1 this is an award winning garden by anyones standards. i am enlarging each photo, zooming in and examining each one closely. i have used Duranta for its color and heat tolerance AND it's not tasty to deer it does have thorns and i have the puncture wounds to prove it

Re: More from Betsy's townhouse garden in New York

just another thing i appreciate about this site. beautiful gardens AND if you don't know what a plant is someone out there will . happily_gardening has identified several cacti for me that i had never known what they were. still enjoying these photos and i am liking those plant markers

Re: More from Betsy's townhouse garden in New York

i just re read the intro and saw that she must take everything through her house i'm doubly amazed now

Re: More from Betsy's townhouse garden in New York

i want to live here. one of my favorites too and apologizing for an ironweed stem? only someone who loves their garden would say that. it's all just perfect

Re: Jenni's garden in Virginia

i wish i could retire . i'll be 95 years old on my HoverRound screaming at my help to "pull that weed" "you missed one"

Re: Jenni's garden in Virginia

meander1 i wish you were my neighbor. you're a good "yankee" :) sorry i couldn't resist

Re: Jenni's garden in Virginia

tractor1 i think i would like to meet you one day and i'm sure we would have a lively conversation/debate/argument and it would be enjoyable for us both.
i don't think submitting photos of others gardens public or private is plagerism unless you take credit for the work so far i have not known of anyone here doing that. many many public spaces are not known outside their local area and many would never know about them without this forum. as far as professional landscapers never touching the dirt, i was degreed in 1981 have been in business since 1986 and i'm still the dirtiest one on the landscape crew and a good 95% of the people i have met in the business , unless it is a landscape construction machine kind of operation, are the same. i have hundreds if not thousands of photos here that i have taken and the private gardens/plants i have always asked permission and never take credit for the work. let us all just enjoy and learn from what people here share with us. if just the URL was supplied for the cedarholme inn i probably would never have clicked on it but with the photos i wanted to see more. not criticizing, not arguing just stating a different viewpoint and not everyone who knows anything about gardening comes up with the same assumption. i do, however, wish i could handle much MORE of the dirty lucre, it seems to be in short supply much of the time

Re: Jenni's garden in Virginia

meander1 i have been to the UT trial gardens but it has been a long time ago. i have very little free time "in season". i saw you mention fulton md, i spent alot of time growing up in Howard County, my aunt lived adjacent to Carroll Manor and ran the Forest Diner for decades now i'm hungry for crabcakes

Re: Jenni's garden in Virginia

jenni, we all love your garden and i think all would agree that now your "bubble girl" is an international star!
greenthumblonde i have seen the pics of your garden and yep, i think you are definitely a gardener!
sheila, you have me rolling,,,,,,point and shoot camera :)

Re: Jenni's garden in Virginia

violetfern, just think of yourself as New York, New York,,,,,,a city so nice they had to say it twice

rained out so here i am, i'm sure Fine Gardening is going to block me at any moment

Re: Jenni's garden in Virginia

maybe many of the posters here are like me in that they grow vegetables but don't include photos because many vegetable gardens (again like mine) are not that attractive. Lee Reich's , however, are spellbinding. i only have a pick and eat garden now as time is limited and i am fortunate to have 2 good farmers markets nearby and i'm happy to support them. i think anyone who grows anything is a gardener. i once spotted a little house with more hanging baskets than i have ever seen in one place hanging in tiers on the front porch. at first i thought "oh no" but i stopped and the lady who lived there was 90 years old , had always gardened but couldn't work the earth as she once did so her grandchildren created this hanging garden for her to enjoy and cultivate as she was no longer "bendy" enough for gardening in the earth.so for me, a few pots, a window box, a rooftop garden or 2 pots flanking the front door,,,,,there's a gardener in that house somewhere

Re: Jenni's garden in Virginia

meander1 you always have the nicest things to say. you aren't that far from me and if ever you are "up this way" let me know, would love to give you the garden tour of Kingsport. i do not have a grand home or garden but i do have a welcoming home and we could have Beergaritas in the back garden after the tour

Re: Jenni's garden in Virginia

lush, full, exuberant and garden "stuff" i love it
my daughter "helped" me in the garden when small then when she got old enough to be real help she disappeared! now grown and on her own she asks if i have any pots i don't use, then if i have soil and then "well, what do you have that i can put in these pots"
let the kids do everything they want in the garden , , they will keep that with them all their life

Re: The gardens at Cedarholm Garden Bay Inn in Maine

you are more than welcome at Halloween. we have quite a mix of people and costumes are not mandatory but are encouraged. those not in costume are ridiculed mercilessly

i think this meeting at Michelle's is gaining momentum. summer GPOD meeting,,, sounds sort of like a previously undisclosed migratory marinelife confab

Re: The gardens at Cedarholm Garden Bay Inn in Maine

ohhhhh, this is definitely going on the calendar!

Re: The gardens at Cedarholm Garden Bay Inn in Maine

cjgardens, you are too kind. my first day of spring gardening was postponed, 16 degrees this morning. i do have many friends and many "garden wives" around town. last week was fun with the comments and i DO like to talk! i would very much like for all of us to meet somewhere/someday. i nominate Michelle's house :)

Re: The gardens at Cedarholm Garden Bay Inn in Maine

i envy that lambs ear border too here by mid summer it "melts" . helen von stein had always performed for me without that happening until last year . july/august 2012 helen had melted too. it always returns the next season but after that meltdown it never recovers so much in that season. i do have good success with Salvia argentea for that color/texture but it does not have the growth habit of Stachys at all. i'm still studying/enjoying these photos

Re: The gardens at Cedarholm Garden Bay Inn in Maine

i , for one, enjoy ALL the photos submitted here every morning with my wake up coffee. even though i could never re create , duplicate or maintain many of the large scale , elaborate gardens it's great to see them. i always take away an appreciation for the creativity, a new plant i was not familiar with or a new idea of plant combinations. i'm a nosy reader and will check the submitters profile and have found many who have blogs and/or websites FULL of other photos and ideas. this featured garden is especially lush and full of color and would love to visit and be surrounded by everything there "all at once". as a gardener i can't help but think with this garden as well as others featured,, , how much time is spent there grooming, deadheading, nurturing it all.

Re: Tatyana's visit to the Mediterranean garden at Butchart Gardens

tatyana i really enjoyed your photos of Butchart but what i REALLY enjoyed was your website/blog. the photography, the commentary and your obvious "thrill of the hunt" in discovering plants and gardeners . i have learned that if someone is growing something,,,,,,a large garden, small or just a few pots of flowers,,,,,,that they are almost always a pleasure to meet and will take the time to talk. i have met many many great people by just stopping and complimenting their gardening efforts and a lot of the time have left with a shared plant from their garden

Re: More from Jeff's garden in Tennessee

passwords, not sure if you will ever see this since it's a past post but those potheads i got probably 25 years ago from Smith & Hawken when it was still the real deal. they were made by Rookes Pottery/ UK no clue if they are even still in business

Re: Tatyana's visit to the Mediterranean garden at Butchart Gardens

butchart gardens ALWAYS beautiful. the photos make me hungry for summer

Re: Another garden from Jeff in Tennessee

thx, cwheat, i have enjoyed the week interacting with other gardeners and i DO like to talk! i'm pleased that you enjoyed the photos, i am starting spring here on monday. i don't look for robins to determine it's arrival i look at bank statements! time to go back to work

Re: Another garden from Jeff in Tennessee

no vacay for me anytime soon, i am starting spring chores on Monday

Re: Another garden from Jeff in Tennessee

i would say " i hate you" but i just can't :)
enjoy your valentines day

Re: Another garden from Jeff in Tennessee

i feel very lucky to do what i do and would probably do it for free but do NOT tell my clients that!
personal tip: i have found that tequila helps with the dulled out periods :)

Re: Another garden from Jeff in Tennessee

i just looked at all your nature photography , happily_gardening, and it made me homesick for California!

Re: Another garden from Jeff in Tennessee

and as i get older someone may ask me to identify a plant in the morning and i don't remember the name until after lunch when it just pops into my head out of the blue. i truly need defragmentation of my brain and a pillow that records my dreams would be awesome so i could watch them all later

Re: Another garden from Jeff in Tennessee

shineeday, i know i shouldn't assume things but i do and i didn't identify any plants. my problem and i welcome any input is how to identify the plants when there are many in the photo? a list wouldn't help and i don't know how to do the labeling as they do in the magazine. if i have individual plant pictures i'm sure michelle would delete :)
i would be more than happy to identify any plants in these photos you are curious about and if you have any suggestions as to how i can label the plants in the photos i would love it. i've been gardening all my life and i still see plants daily that i have no idea what they are and i have several here at home that are unidentified,,,,,,,,especially the cacti and succulents. happily_gardening identified one cactus i have had for 30 years ,,, i never knew until this week what it was

Re: Another garden from Jeff in Tennessee

shelia, thanks for the comments and they made my day! every day is a choice on our part to make it great or not. i have a blast everyday! we do alot of container plantings/seasonal change outs but for me it's easy when rushed to get dulled out. how do you keep it fresh and different when everyone wants it all at the same time?

Re: Another garden from Jeff in Tennessee

i did not identify any plants in the photos because i assumed they were all known i didn't send photos of the more unusual or hard to find plants. happy to identify any you are curious about . the kim fern confusion i can understand because most are accustomed to seeing them used as container plants rather than directly planted

Re: Another garden from Jeff in Tennessee

i am not the photographer of the fog photos. mrs grimes sent those to me and i included them as i liked them too.
yes, lots of wildlife there i think i could ride the turkeys they are so large . visit exchange place and i'm sure they would let you do any chores you were willing to tackle they have volunteers working there all the time.

Re: Another garden from Jeff in Tennessee

the light pink bushy plants in front are dwarf spirea and i can't remember the variety off the top of my head. we use a product called PlantSkyyd as a deer repellent. it is without a doubt the most horrible smelling stuff even created when first applied, the hotter the weather the worse it smells until it dries. it works and it lasts . it's made from processed pig blood and trust,,,,,,,,,it's awful

Re: Another garden from Jeff in Tennessee

yep, those are Kim ferns and they are annuals. they were once not so easy to find but the last few years i find HUGE ones at walmart very cheap,,,,,,,divide them into halves and use them for instant gratification in the landscape. Macho fern is another beautiful, tough, durable one to use. it's like a boston fern on steroids

Re: Another garden from Jeff in Tennessee

not alot to see on the woodland path right now. alotof things are dormant, deer ate ALL the leucothoe, rode down a couple of Ligustrum and Cryptomeria by rubbing their antlers, evergreen ferns are flat from snow it's time to get to work and get things ready for spring. the deer even ate a Needle palm down to the nub and i thought they were deer proof or at least resistant

Re: More from Jeff's garden in Tennessee

happily_gardening i would be most interested in seeing more of your nature photography and i am the ONLY person in the world without facebook
gardenguy37642@gmail.com i just created that account

i promise i'm not a stalker or crazy person, ok ok the crazy part is debatable

Re: More from Jeff's garden in Tennessee

if you live near knoxville you should know that the daylilies you liked came from Ed Kinsey/ Kinsey Gardens in Knoxville.
if you're going to asheville for bullington gardens might as well go to the arboreteum while you're there and grab a bite at tupelo honey downtown PLENTY to do in asheville
bob bullington was quite a character, i never met anyone quite like him before or since. i have many great memories, photographs and plants from him
and no matter how cranky he was (but always with a twinkle in his eye) he always cut a fresh bouquet from the garden for his wife every day

Re: More from Jeff's garden in Tennessee

how many sonic spikes would it take? i have almost 2 acres planted and i am surrounded by 20 acres of hay. i contacted UT extension and they said to get a cat, i told them i had a cat and i was told to get a REAL big cat. i'll check out the spikesat lowe's, i haven't been there in a few days and sure they miss me
i'm serious about halloween all would be welcome and i never refuse a plant

Re: More from Jeff's garden in Tennessee

i can imagine, Michelle, those big dreamy alpaca eyes then suddenly,,,,,,moco loco right in the face
i'm loving the interaction so it's open invitation to 2013 halloween party, BYOB i can't cut into the garden budget to get everyone snockered but be forewarned i AM a wildman and sometimes stay up till.......11 PM !!!

Re: More from Jeff's garden in Tennessee

happily_gardening, i do not write for the paper, i have never written anything in my life but i DO talk too much,,,ask anybody
we do have alot of wildlife visiting here and for the most part they cause no damage EXCEPT for voles and i can't find a remedy for that. i envy your weather for gardening in California , i spent a couple of years or so in the monterey/carmel area but tell me,,,,,,,,how does anyone afford to live there?!?!?
the frog prince has been stored away for winter and will re emerge mid april
CJgardens, i do not have any system for watering the containers other than by hand. it's my "thinking time" . i have many cacti/succulents that do not require alot of waterand for others i have large enough pots so that they are not that demanding but it's all relative, some would say i'm nuts for having that many to take care of but it's really not a big deal to keep up with it. glad you enjoyed the bullington website,,, bob bullington was a horticultural wizard and i spent alot of time there when he was alive. met dr. john creech there and dr. j c raulston, learned alot alot hanging out with them in the headhouse or the back terrace

Re: More from Jeff's garden in Tennessee

happily_gardening, i do keep trying with photos but i'm not very good at it. i have LOTS of birds here, bluebirds are now checking out the real estate. i once had a bald eagle not sure anyone ever believed me but there is no mistaking that bird. one morning years back i was having coffee on the back porch just after daybreak on a foggy morning and 5 alpacas appeared just off the porch. i thought i was hallucinating or having a flashback of some sort (i have worried about this since the '70s) but turns out we had new neighbors up valley who raised alpaca and some had escaped so i wasn't crazy after all

Re: More from Jeff's garden in Tennessee

happily_gardening i'm still enjoying your photos of the bees/butterflies. i've tried to capture that but i don't have the proper camera, patience or steady hand.
many many many of the more mature landscape plants here are from my friend Bob Bullington in hendersonville nc. he died a number of years back but left his place to henderson county and it is now www.bullingtoncenter.org they are doing some great things there and i know he would be proud

Re: More from Jeff's garden in Tennessee

meander1, i hope i have happy clients. i have been with most for a long long time. not sure why though, i'm grumpy, opinionated, i "cuss" too much (but i think of those words as sentence enhancers),i make decisions too fast,,,,,,,sometimes i'm right, sometimes i'm wrong but i'm never unsure
but i do know that i have GREAT clients who are now friends and a few are even brave enough to attend the annual Halloween party

Re: More from Jeff's garden in Tennessee

the insulators came into use because i almost blinded myself on those curly plant stakes so i left them on there for protection and i kinda like the way they catch the light thruout the day.

Re: More from Jeff's garden in Tennessee

nope, it's a cast iron snake a client picked up for me at Tamarack WV. that is an Emerald Isle leyland cypress that is no longer suffering,,,,,,,i removed them all. i rank leyland cypress right up there with bradford pears as big horticultural mistakes. the glassy things are here primarily for the kids, people come here to see plants and kids get bored FAST but they do like shiny things, "scary" things like the head in the hole or the snake and fun things. i have a giant frog with a crown hidden among the plants,,,,, kids always discover it adults rarely do. i like getting them interested in gardens/plants even if i do have to use tricks

Re: Jeff's garden in Tennessee

in the 5th picture to the left of the flat stones is a bed of Hellebores, behind that nearer the garage is Calycanthus, hanging from the tree is Macho fern with Clivia directly beneath it and Tradescantia to the right of the Clivia
in the last picture that is Tsuga canadensis 'Pendula' in the 9th picture there is a Tsuga canadensis 'Gentsch White' directly in front of the Picea orientalis aurea 'Skylands'
there are other varieties of canadian hemlock here but weren't included in photos. wooly adelgids are now a problem for some hemlock varieties here

Re: Jeff's garden in Tennessee

i have lots of hummers here in summer just none on that particular agave. the flower spike grew 6 to 8 inches each day reaching 12 ft / took 3 months to show flowers and after all the anticipation i was a little underwhelmed.
CJGardens, the daylilies are in the western border and weren't included in the photos, maybe 100 large overgrown clumps and 12 massive clumps of Agapanthus. it will be a total wrestling match

Re: Jeff's garden in Tennessee

great insectography! when the Agave flowered i expected to be swarmed by hummingbirds but it didn't happen. the flowers were like fur on the end of the spike but i did get ants,,,,,,,,,lots and lots of ants

Re: Jeff's garden in Tennessee

ihave never grown san pedro cactus but i did see it growing in Peru,,,,,,,,,,,HUGE

Re: Jeff's garden in Tennessee

you are correct Happily_Gardening and thanks for identifying it for me. i especially liked the youtube time lapse opening of the flowers

Re: Jeff's garden in Tennessee

honestly, i have no idea what the white flowered cactus is. it was given to me years and years ago and has grown, fallen apart, given birth to hundreds of offsets and continues to flower all summer at night closing usually by 10 am or so the following day. i have many cacti, euphorbia, succulents and sadly am ignorant as to the proper names of many of them

Re: Jeff's garden in Tennessee

thanks for the comments! you're right the basement is full of dormant potted plants, the house is full and the bathtub in a rarely used bathroom is hosting a collection of Cycads and Dioons until spring. that is the same Agave one pic was taken maybe a week before the flower spike emerged i had that plant for probably 40 years. the containerized japanese maple was a wedding gift of 3 small 2 year seedlings from Bob Bullington of Hendersonville NC 27 years ago. have a few hundred species growing here and i wish all of you could visit,,,,preferably around mid March,,, i have ALOT of daylilies i need to divide and i could use the help!