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Tsuga canadensis 'Pendula' (Sargent's weeping hemlock, Eastern hemlock)

Tsuga canadensis 'Pendula' Tsuga canadensis 'Pendula' Photo/Illustration: Michelle Gervais


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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Botanical Name: Tsuga canadensis 'Pendula' SOO-gah kan-ah-DEN-sis Common Name: Sargent's weeping hemlock, Eastern hemlock Synonyms: Tsuga canadensis f. pendula Genus: Tsuga
This hemlock cultivar makes a very beautiful specimen, slowly forming a 10- to 15-foot-tall and 30-foot-wide, multi-layered mound of greenery. Its horizontally speading branches are covered with smaller weeping branches clothed in short, dark green needles. It looks great growing over a rock wall, in a rock garden, or by water. Its size may be controlled by regular clipping.
Noteworthy characteristics: Most hemlocks are native to forests of Southeastern Asia and North America. They can tolerate a considerable amount of shade, particularly when young.
Care: Provide moist, but well-drained (acidic to slightly alkaline) soil in full sun to full shade. Hemlocks are notably at risk of infestation by woolly adelgids, scale, and mites.
Propagation: Sow seed in a cold frame in spring.
Problems: Botrytis (gray mold), rust, needle blights, butt rot, snow blight, weevils, mites, aphids, woolly adelgid, scale.
Height 10 ft. to 15 ft.
Spread 15 ft. to 30 ft.
Growth Pace Slow Grower
Light Full Sun to Part Shade
Moisture Medium Moisture
Maintenance Low
Tolerance Frost Tolerant
Characteristics Native; Showy Foliage; Showy Seed Heads
Foliage Color Evergreen
Uses Hedge, Naturalizing, Screening, Specimen Plant/ Focal Point, Topiary, Waterside
Style Shade, Formal Garden, Rock Garden, Woodland Garden
Seasonal Interest Winter Interest, Spring Interest, Summer Interest, Fall Interest
Type Trees

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