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Stipa gigantea (Giant feather grass, Golden oats)

Stipa gigantea Photo/Illustration: Michelle Gervais

(Based on 1 user review)

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Botanical Name: Stipa gigantea STY-pah jy-GAN-tee-ah Common Name: Giant feather grass, Golden oats Genus: Stipa
This semi-evergreen species makes a stately, stand-alone specimen with narrow, arching foliage and shimmering gold panicles that reach 8 feet tall. The flowers open in June as silvery-purple and mature to shades of wheat.
Noteworthy characteristics: Stipa are tufted, clump-forming species are native to temperate and warm temperate regions of the world. They are suitable as accents or specimens in grass or rock gardens, and for naturalizing, wild gardens, and erosion control. Their inflorescences may be used for dried flower arrangements. 
Care: Grow in moderately fertile, well-drained soil in full sun. Remove the old foliage in early spring.
Propagation: Sow seed in a cold frame in spring; divide from mid-spring to early summer.
Problems: Damping off, rust, smut, brown patch, brown stripe, eye spot.
Height 6 ft. to 10 ft.
Spread 3 ft. to 6 ft.
Growth Habit Clumps
Growth Pace Moderate Grower
Light Full Sun Only
Moisture Adaptable
Maintenance Low
Tolerance Deer Tolerant;Drought Tolerant;Frost Tolerant
Characteristics Self Seeds; Showy Flowers; Showy Foliage; Showy Seed Heads
Bloom Time Summer
Foliage Color Evergreen
Flower Color Brown Flower; Purple/ Lavender Flower
Uses Beds and Borders, Dried Flower, Naturalizing, Specimen Plant/ Focal Point
Style Meadow Garden, Rock Garden
Seasonal Interest Winter Interest, Spring Interest, Summer Interest, Fall Interest
Type Grasses

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