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Halesia carolina (Carolina silverbell)

Halesia carolina Photo/Illustration: Paul Moore

(Based on 1 user review)

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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Botanical Name: Halesia carolina hah-LEE-see-ah kare-oh-LY-nah Common Name: Carolina silverbell Synonyms: Halesia tetraptera Genus: Halesia
Carolina silverbell is a handsome tree with clean green foliage and an upright spreading habit. In mid- or late spring, hundreds of silvery-white bell-shaped flowers dangle from every branch before foliage emerges. The tree also has attractive bark, unusual four-winged seedpods, and yellow fall color.
Care: Grow in fertile, humus-rich, moist but well-drained, neutral to acidic soil. Shelter from wind.
Propagation: Root softwood cuttings in summer
Problems: Root and wood rot, scale insects.
Height 15 ft. to 30 ft.
Spread 15 ft. to 30 ft.
Growth Habit Spreads
Light Full Sun to Part Shade
Moisture Medium Moisture
Characteristics Interesting Bark; Native; Showy Flowers; Showy Seed Heads
Bloom Time Spring
Flower Color White Flower
Uses Flowering Tree, Specimen Plant/ Focal Point
Seasonal Interest Spring Interest, Summer Interest
Type Trees

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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

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