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Genus Sedum (Stonecrop)

Sedum Sedum sieboldii Photo/Illustration: Chris Curless
SEE-dum Common Name: Stonecrop
The genus Sedum encompasses a diverse group of succulent plants, ranging from diminutive mats to 2-foot shrubby mounds. They are most often grown for their colorful, clean foliage and ease of culture.
Noteworthy characteristics: Foliage colors ranging from smoky blue to rich burgundy throughout the season. Seed heads provide autumn interest.
Care: Prefers moderately fertile soil in full sun, but can take it drier. Some species may take some shade. Tip-prune larger species at 6 to 8 inches to shorten and delay flowering.
Propagation: Take softwood cuttings or root leaves in early summer. Start seed of hardy species in fall, others in early spring. Divide in spring.
Problems: Mealybugs, scale, slugs, and snails.

Species, varieties and cultivars for genus Sedum

Sedum 'Autumn Delight' Sedum 'Autumn Delight'
(Stonecrop)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Large, bright-pink clusters of flowers are accentuated by lime-green leaves with a dark-green serrated edge.

Information provided by Santa Rosa Gardens.
 

Sedum 'Postman's Pride' Sedum 'Postman's Pride'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Postman's Pride' sedum is a wonderful dark-foliaged plant for sunny, dry locations. It has a semi-upright habit and produces masses of red to purple flowers from late summer through fall. The flowers attract honeybees and butterflies. Like other sedums, 'Postman's Pride' is useful in rock and xeriscape gardens because, once established, it thrives without irrigation except during severe droughts. Curious about the cultivar name? This plant was discovered by a Belgian postal carrier in his garden. -Ron Smith, Regional Picks: Upper Plains, Fine Gardening issue #120

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’
(Stonecrop)
(13 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant is as dependable and adaptable as they come. Its flowers bloom from August into November; they open pink and mature to a copper befitting of autumn. It is 2 feet tall and wide, with succulent stems and leaves. 'Autumn Joy' looks great with ornamental grasses.  

Sedum ‘Ruby Glow’ Sedum ‘Ruby Glow’
(Stonecrop)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In summer to late summer, this low-growing Sedum has rosy-red flowers atop small, fleshy blue-green leaves with ruddy highlights. Plants grow 8-12 inches tall and 18 inches wide.

Sedum cauticola Sedum cauticola
(Stonecrop)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This Japanese native is perfect for the rock garden. It is a compact species with blue-green foliage and pink stems, and bears purplish-red flowers in fall. Sedum cauticola grows to about 3 inches tall and a foot wide.

Sedum kamtschaticum Sedum kamtschaticum
(Stonecrop)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This tough, drought-tolerant species has glossy deep green leaves and, in early summer, half-inch golden yellow flowers that open from pink buds. It grows to about 6 inches tall and a little wider and makes a good groundcover. 

Sedum kamtschaticum 'Variegatum’ Sedum kamtschaticum 'Variegatum’
(Stonecrop)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This variety is more compact than the species, and its leaves are variegated with creamy margins. In late spring to summer, its star-shaped yellow flowers open from pink buds and mature to crimson. It grows to just 4 inches tall and 12 inches wide.

Sedum kamtschaticum 'Weihenstephaner Gold' Sedum kamtschaticum 'Weihenstephaner Gold'
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This low-growing sedum has dependable, dark bronzy green foliage and prolific flowering. New spring growth is a welcome, cheerful red. Prolific, star-shaped flowers are golden yellow with pinkish orange overtones and cover the plant twice during the growing season. Plants grow to just 2-4 inches tall and 10 inches wide.

Sedum rupestre Sedum rupestre
(Rocky stonecrop, Stone orpine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a vigorous, mat-forming evergreen species with small gray-green leaves and terminal clusters of star-shaped, vibrant yellow flowers in summer. The drooping buds face upward when they open. It grows to 4 inches tall and 2 feet across.

Sedum rupestre 'Angelina' Sedum rupestre 'Angelina'
(Stone orpine)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This vigorous, mat-forming, evergreen species has electric golden-yellow foliage that holds its color through the heat of summer. The foliage tips sometimes develop an orangey hue. In June and July, 'Angelina' has terminal clusters of star-shaped, vibrant yellow flowers. The drooping buds face upward when they open and the plant can grow to 6 inches tall and 12 inches wide. It is superlative as a groundcover, spilling over rock walls, and in containers. It also makes an excellent accent for plants with dark foliage.

Sedum sieboldii Sedum sieboldii
(October Daphne, Stonecrop)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This lovely mound-like species splays out from the center like a miniature fountain. It has half-inch rosy flowers in fall and blue-green leaves with matching rosy margins. Frosty temperatures bring out pink in the leaves. Sedum sieboldii grows to 4 inches tall and about twice as wide.

Sedum spectabile Sedum spectabile
(Showy stonecrop, Everlasting)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

An upright species to 18 inches tall and wide, this plant bears pink flowers in August that persist into fall. Thick, almost succulent leaves are bluish green. S. spectabile was crossed with S. telephium to create the very popular 'Autumn Joy.'

Sedum spurium 'Fuldaglut' Sedum spurium 'Fuldaglut'
(Two-row stonecrop)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This mat-forming species forms a carpet of rosy-red flowers in late July and August, contrasting against green leaves with bronzy-maroon highlights.

Sedum telephium 'Matrona' Sedum telephium 'Matrona'
(Stonecrop)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This choice cultivar boasts domed clusters of starry, pale-pink flowers with dark-tipped stamens. The foliage is medium blue-green, overlaid by tints of burgundy and stormy gray. The rich red stems reach up to 3 feet tall.

Sedum tetractinum Sedum tetractinum
(Fish-scale sedum)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Plant a succulent sedum in the shade? Yes. Ground-cover sedums do well in dry-shade areas, especially in places that have high summer heat. Shallow, dry soils are no problem for this plant, as it stores extra water in its foliage. Fish-scale sedum spreads by runners forming a mat of overlapping, rounded foliage, which resembles fish scales. Bright yellow flower spikes appear over the shiny foliage during summer, and the cooler weather of autumn transforms the evergreen foliage to reddish bronze. I tuck this plant between exposed roots of deciduous trees, where little else will grow. Make sure not to plant in moist or waterlogged soils as it will rot easily. Any piece of this plant will root to form a new colony, so it is easy to spread about the shade garden. -Jimmy Turner, Perennials for dry shade, Fine Gardening issue #133