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Garden Photo of the Day

Garden Photo of the Day

Gayle & Larry's garden in Illinois

comments (18) May 24th, 2013 in blogs
MichelleGervais Michelle Gervais, Senior Editor
126 users recommend

2 WAYS TO ENLARGE: Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE: Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE: Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE: Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE: Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE: Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE: Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE: Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE: Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE: Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE: Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window. Click the image to enlarge.

2 WAYS TO ENLARGE: Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.

Photo: Courtesy of Gayle Ruprecht

Today's photos are from Gayle Ruprecht in Chicago. She says, "My husband Larry and I are longtime residents of Chicago's historic suburb Oak Park. We purchased our home nearly thirty years ago. Our residence, with its "prairie style" characteristics and spacious yard, provides the perfect setting for our modern Asian garden.
   Larry began creating the garden in 2008. Having been a Fine Arts major in college and owned a construction company, he applied his artistic ability and craftsmanship skills to the design and creation of the garden.
   Larry personally selected materials from upscale nurseries in both Illinois and Wisconsin for this project. The primary structures of the garden are "linear hardscapes" Consisting of various types of concrete and limestone. In addition, Larry carefully researched and chose a variety of plantings, including Tanyosho pines, weeping larches, Japanese white pines, spruces, and moss for his creation.
   Larry's overall goal in expending the time, creative thought, and physical effort in the development of the garden was to achieve a visual seasonal appeal and create an outward display of nature's beauty everyone could appreciate." Well, I'd say he's been successful, Gayle! Larry, your garden is striking and beautiful. That big stone is spectacular! I can only imagine how you positioned it there in the yard... I'm all for exuberant, floriferous gardens, but gardens like this tug at me even more. The whole thing is so heavenly. Thanks for sharing it!

***I'm getting so many great submissions, but I can always use more! Dig out your cameras, take a big long walk around your garden, and SEND ME PHOTOS! I love having more than I could possibly process to choose from. Thanks!!***

***One more thing.....have you always wondered what your fellow GPODers are like in person? Never thought you'd get a chance to meet them? Check this out.... While the GPOD isn't officially a taunton forum, it's close enough, and I wanted to extend the invite. Anybody at all interested? I'd be willing to search for some gardens to tour...

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posted in: Illinois

Comments (18)

JaneEliz writes: Truly unique and so elegant! Posted: 9:41 pm on May 28th
Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt writes: Late to the party again, but had to say that this is so beautifully and artfully done! Before reading the comments, my mind was on what is a common thread: oh how i admire your restraint! Like all good japanese-inspired gardens, it is obviously beautiful in all seasons. Posted: 9:20 am on May 25th
Gardenbeauty writes: This is an absolutely beautiful garden that has taken a lot of time, effort and thought. The space is a beyond words. Larry you have created a masterpiece of your own!

You have created a special entrance that invites the visitor into a sense of sanctuary effectively using water for its psychological, spiritual, and physical effects. Creatively using color and lighting to elicit emotion, comfort, and awe in the visitor creating sitting areas that enfold by providing a place of rest by highlighting natural features of anchor points, including the use of rocks, natural fences and screens to integrate art that engages the overall mood! I can only imagine what it would be like sitting on that beautiful patio enjoy a morning cup of joe, listening to the morning awake.

Tractor1: I would love to see what your back yard looks like? Who is to say a Japanese garden has to have a Koi pond or bridge? Having visited Japan, there is NO right and or wrong way to capture natures BEAUTY! Looks to me like you are lacking knowledge about what lies beneath the beauty of nature.

Posted: 8:46 am on May 25th
wGardens writes: Fabulous! Thanks for sharing. I love what you have done. Your skills are perfection! Great ideas, great results. Posted: 9:44 pm on May 24th
ancientgardener writes: Serene is the word. It lacks just one thing - a comfortable seat for me to bring my book. Fear I would not get much reading done. I'd be soaking up the beauty. Reminds me of the beautiful Japanese garden in Portland, Or. where I also longed to spend an afternoon just listening to water spill from a piece of bamboo amongst the simple, peaceful surroundings. Posted: 8:31 pm on May 24th
NancyLS writes: This garden is outstanding, such refined selections and design. Posted: 7:26 pm on May 24th
tntreeman writes: i see nothing "commercialized" about this space AT ALL and not all asian influenced gardens have an obligatory koi pond and bridge and a booth for admission? i would pay , it's a great space that took much planning, thought and work for it's implementation. it's very easy to be condescending and many times just hateful with the security of being behind a keyboard far away. i have tried and i simply can not fathom the mindset of some people and their comments perhaps it's not the properties featured but "their eye" that is the problem
trashywoman i had a weeping larch here in east tennessee and it lived fine BUT the japanese beetles ate it back to hard wood in one day Posted: 4:01 pm on May 24th
tractor1 writes: All very intriguing, a lot of effort and $$$ to create but looks rather commercialized to my eye, as though there should be a booth stating the cost of admission... still it's lacking a significant koi pond, with obligatory bridge, perhaps next year. So, you've been there thirty years, what was your property like the other twenty five years... just asking. Posted: 11:59 am on May 24th
jagardener writes: Peaceful and serene. More pictures,please. Posted: 9:40 am on May 24th
cwheat000 writes: It is wonderful to see different garden styles and you have so masterfully executed this style. This minimalist style allows one to really appreciate the detailed beauty in each specimen. It is the polar opposite of my exuberant cottage style garden, but I truly enjoy it. I wish I could live long enough to grow every style of garden. Posted: 9:15 am on May 24th
SweetPeaGardens writes: Love it! So peaceful and serene, a lovely place to unwind at the end of a hectic day. It appears that there is something to focus upon from every angle. This is a perfect example of less is more. Well done! Posted: 9:10 am on May 24th
SilkPurseGarden writes: Makes my heart SING! Oh, Larry, it's paradise. What's it like to have a perfect garden? Love the sumac, Japanese maple, larch, japanese garden juniper composition next to your sitting area. (I might steal the sumac idea.) Your fountain is pure grace and will only get better when one of those spruce arms drapes nearer. Love it all--Congratulations.

trashywoman62: weeping larches are sturdier than their delicate appearance would suggest. I have several and they have done very well here in Maine even taking partial shade and my horrible clay soil (amended, of course). Give them a try! They're worth it! Posted: 9:03 am on May 24th
trashywoman62 writes: Wow! Larry, Gayle, you have a wonderful garden that must be as beautiful in the winter covered with snow as it is now. I love the significance each plant has on its own as well as part of the whole. Love the red of the maple showing through in the green pines.

But for all it's formality I also found small items that tickle my funny bone like the rusty, metal "scarecrow" in your veggie garden and the bluish, gray twisted metal shooting out from the blue hostas in 4th photo, right side.

Jay, I too, have Larch envy! And this specimen is amazing! I saw my first fall colored photo of a Larch in a magazine ad for a landscaping school in the northeast and called the school to see what plant it was! Evidently, I wasn't the only one because the receptionist who answered the phone knew exactly what ad and plant I was referencing! I just wish I could find one small enough to fit in my pocketbook! I hate losing $100 or more if its not happy where I put it and don't realize it till its too late!

Posted: 8:06 am on May 24th
hortiphila writes: SPECTACULAR! Posted: 7:09 am on May 24th
Jay_Sifford writes: OK OK, so I was raised in Charlotte and firmly believe that there's only one thing that could make me want to move to the North and this garden has one: a weeping larch. I would give my proverbial eye teeth to be able to grow one of those things. I'd trade a truckload of crepe myrtles and fatsias in a heartbeat!

Beautifully thought out, beautifully executed...there's not much else to say.

tntreeman, I love plants too but this type of garden calls my name louder and louder. The last garden I designed is so classically something I couldn't live with but I love it more than I can explain... no turf, granite screenings with bluestone "planks" inlaid, a triptych of large granite spheres. Now there are some plants, but this garden made me think of that one.

Wonderful job Gayle and Larry! Now send me your larch! Posted: 6:43 am on May 24th
meander1 writes: The architectural consistency that this type of outdoor landscaping displays is very cleansing and appealing. I can appreciate and admire it although I do not have the self discipline and vision to ever put it into practice for myself. Gayle, it looks like it is in beautiful harmony with the glimpses that show of your home. Congratulations to your husband, Larry,for all the artistically impeccable choices he made in bringing this handsome landscape vision to fruition. Posted: 6:38 am on May 24th
tree_ee writes: Gorgeous! As a plant collector, I'm in awe of your discipline. Posted: 6:37 am on May 24th
tntreeman writes: i love this space, clean/ functional and each plant selected and placed perfectly. i wish i could do this at home but i'm a plant hoarder. beautiful garden and hardscapes Posted: 4:21 am on May 24th
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