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Post a photo See all posts in this gallery

small perennial clump

comments (7) March 8th, 2013 in gallery
flotsam50 flotsam50, member
5 users recommend

 Click the image to enlarge. Photo: flotsam50

This perennial forms neat, 10 inch high clumps of foliage which remain mostly evergreen through the winter here in the Pacific Northwest (Zone 8). In late winter or early spring it produces dozens of solitary lavender purple flowers with white anthers and a chartreuse stigma. The flowers emerge directly from the ground rather than from preexisting growth. The lobed leaves (also solitary) are roughly club shaped and are borne atop slightly wiry stems. My guess is that the plant is some kind of anemone, but I have yet to find any reference to such a cultivar. Please help me to identify this lovely, shade-loving specimen.



posted in: The Gallery, winter, perennial, small, shade, evergreen, lavender flowers

Comments (7)

flotsam50 writes: May I enter this controversy? Based on the flower and leaf forms, I would have to agree with tntreeman's identification, namely, Hepatica nobilis. Unlike Jeffersonia dubia, the leaves have three vs. two lobes, while the flowers have narrower, more daisy-like petals with very little overlap. Posted: 9:03 pm on March 14th
tntreeman writes: i'm seeing a tri lobed leaf rather than a "twinleaf" and more thick texture. H. nobilis obtusa? not trying to be difficult just trying to understand the distinction between the two. thx Posted: 5:57 pm on March 11th
tntreeman writes: well they are very similar aren't they, who knew?!?! Posted: 2:29 pm on March 11th
Antonio_Reis writes: Our editors say this is Jeffersonia dubia. Posted: 1:47 pm on March 11th
flotsam50 writes: Thank you both for the information. Hepatica nobilis it is. Posted: 9:28 pm on March 10th
cxsdia writes: Definitely hepatica. Flowers come out in a little bouquet. Then leaves follow. Posted: 12:00 pm on March 9th
tntreeman writes: looks like Hepatica nobilis to me Posted: 7:25 am on March 9th
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