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Garden Photo of the Day

Garden Photo of the Day

Scenes from Constance's garden in early November

comments (6) December 5th, 2012 in blogs
MichelleGervais Michelle Gervais, Senior Editor
82 users recommend

Back of the back yard.  Hamamelis virginiana (witch hazel) in front of my oakleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia).  Below that is a bit of  native Lespedeza.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
The end of the chrysanthemums. I bought this one at Longwood Gardens about 15 years ago.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
These asters were still blooming.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Blood grass next to some Virginia creeper.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
This is a view out from my front door. The laceleaf Japanese maple is almost 50 years old.  The clematis is climbing an obelisk built for me by some of the young men at our technical high school.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Back of the back yard.  Hamamelis virginiana (witch hazel) in front of my oakleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia).  Below that is a bit of  native Lespedeza.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window. Click the image to enlarge.

Back of the back yard.  Hamamelis virginiana (witch hazel) in front of my oakleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia).  Below that is a bit of  native Lespedeza.

2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.

Photo: Courtesy of Constance Hoge

Today's photos are from Constance Hoge. She says, "I live in Westminster, Maryland. That's the middle of the state, and they just upped our zone from 6B to 7A.  I have about 1/3 acre, in town.  My bent is toward native plants, though not exclusively. Trees are my passion. I quit mowing the back half of my yard 3 summers ago and have an ever-changing progression of native perennials and biennials back there. I have been gardening here since 1994, in rocky clay-loam up on a ridge. We get hot and dry, dry, dry in the summer.  I'm always looking for fall color and have succeeded pretty well at that."

>>>>>> BOOK GIVEAWAY PART 2!! <<<<<<
Hey all--there are 3 books left for another giveaway.

50 Beautiful Deer-Resistant Plants by Ruth Rogers Clausen
Front Yard Idea Book by Jeni Webber
The Year-Round Vegetable Gardener by Niki Jabbour

So let's do it! I'll choose randomly from everyone who sends me garden photos by this Friday to win your choice of the remaining books (last photo), plus a mystery bonus! (Hint--it's from one of our sister publications). Email hi-res photos and a description of your garden and what you're showing us to GPOD@taunton.com. I can't wait to see what you send!

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posted in: Maryland

Comments (6)

Olivetgarden writes: The asters and the fallen leaves, fantastic! Love the deep red blood grass too. The contract of shape and size of oak leaf hydrangea with tiny yellow witch hazel flowers is nice. And the Japanese maple--what a grand specimen! I'd love to see more photos of that. Posted: 10:56 am on December 26th
cwheat000 writes: I had trouble receiving the GPOD today. I got to these pics by forwarding ahead from yesterday's. Anyway, I am glad I did. These are some wonderful final shots of the gardening season 2012. Those plants that bloom very early spring and very late fall are always just a little more special, because they are the only ones around. They are an oasis of beauty among all the others that have already past. The oakleaf hydrangea and the blood grass take on their own subtle beauty, as their underlying pigments have a chance to express themselves, before they die. I too must comment on that Japanese maple. Wow! Posted: 12:02 am on December 8th
pattyspencer writes: I'm at a cross between the first and last photo - they are both lovely.

My planting zone got changed as well from a 5A/B to a 6 so I'm kinda excited to see what new plants our nurseries will have once they too realize the change.

Tractor1 - I sorta get what your saying about the blur but I think my real favorite photo is the 1st one because it isn't sharp and crisp - I like it the way it is. Posted: 9:42 pm on December 5th
tractor1 writes: I too like that last photo best, it's nicely composed and offers a depth perspective due to the inclusion of objects at various distances. The other plantings are very colorful but look flat, including the surrondings (and sky) would make them come alive. Okay Constance, where are all those trees you're so passionate about? The camera is focused on your clematis, making that 50 year old maple a red blur... wait for a sunny day and capture your maple again, with the sun at your back, but just the tree, and get all of it with some surroundings and the sky. I bet it's a gorgeous tree but in that photo I can't tell, one wouldn't know it's a Japanese red maple tree from a bush except you said so. Posted: 2:17 pm on December 5th
Annek writes: Ahhh, the glory of the Japanese Maple. Gorgeous fall colors! My favorite photo is the last with the brilliant blue pot setting off your gardening labors. Posted: 10:14 am on December 5th
meander1 writes: Fall color combinations really do create a beautiful, mutli-textured tapestry....love the blood grass with the Virginia creeper. Constance, your 50 year old lace leaf is magnificent and you've "accessoried" to perfection with the stunning cobalt blue pot and the artful climbing clematis.
By the way, I hope next year you will treat us to some pictures of your back meadow garden .

By the way, Michelle, that very annoying Share with friends box popped up in the middle of my posting space and wouldn't go away when I clicked on the "x". So, as I typed, some of my words were hidden behind it. Some amusing misspellings might show up since I couldn't proof read everything I typed. I sure hope this intrusive box location doesn't happen again. Posted: 7:37 am on December 5th
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