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Christmas Trees: Better Cut or Boxed-Up?

comments (0) November 28th, 2012 in blogs
Antonio_Reis Antonio Reis, Product Manager
1 user recommends

A fresh-cut Christmas tree takes less of a toll on the environment than faux replicas. Click the image to enlarge.

A fresh-cut Christmas tree takes less of a toll on the environment than faux replicas.

Photo: Danielle Sherry

You love the environment, but you adore decked halls and Christmas trees. Sadly, no Christmas tree is carbon neutral. But merrymakers can choose a lesser evil by cutting down a fresh tree every year, or so says Clint Springer, Ph.D., and assistant professor of biology at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia.

"A study as recent as 2009 (Ellipsos) concluded that a 7-foot cut tree's impact on climate is 60 percent less than a 7-foot artificial tree used for six years. So while cut trees are not carbon-neutral, in terms of carbon-use, they are better than artificial trees," he tells ScienceDaily.com.

Read the whole article here, then fetch your bowsaw and head to the tree farm; preferably a local one.





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