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Post a photo See all posts in this gallery

what is this plant?

comments (3) November 27th, 2012 in gallery
koontzman koontzman, member
1 user recommends


We found a bunch of these 1 to 10 feet from the water. Ground was grassy and bog-like. The flower (leaf?) wraps around itself to hold water. It was near Timmins, Ontario in September 2012.



posted in: The Gallery

Comments (3)

koontzman writes: Thank you Jenion and jellyfishy. Posted: 4:34 pm on November 29th
Jenion writes: Sarracenia purpurea - American pitcher plant. The pitchers holding water are modified leaves. They live in boggy, low-nutrient soils, and get their nutrients from what they catch in the pitchers. Insects are attracted to them, fall in, and are digested. The flowers will be well above the pitchers, so as not to eat the insects it needs to be pollinated.

https://picasaweb.google.com/104727896858837258636/BloomingSarracenia#slideshow/5452358384130201986 Posted: 7:27 am on November 28th
jellyfishy writes: Looks like Sarracenia (carnivorous plant) Posted: 2:34 am on November 28th
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