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Post a photo See all posts in this gallery

unknown plant?

comments (4) November 27th, 2012 in gallery
ssstrawser ssstrawser, member
no recommendations


I've been asked to identify this plant and I have no idea...though I've seen it before. It's growing in northern California. A friend also has one (he did not plant) in England.



posted in: The Gallery

Comments (4)

sharocky writes: That is seed stalk after the arrowhead plant (Syngonium podophyllum) blooms. It can be irritating to the skin so wear gloves when handling. Its popular as a house plant, but in the yard it is an invasive noxious weed. I made the mistake of putting it my garden. It was pretty until it began to take over. get it out asap because it is difficult to eradicate. it roots deep and is almost impossible to get rid of. I suggest growing in a pot if you really like it. hope this helps. Posted: 3:22 pm on June 7th
plantjunkie writes: I the south it's referred to as 'Lords and Ladies' but does have a thuggish habit if its happy Posted: 9:42 pm on January 9th
Seamew writes: Here's some text from the Missouri Botanical garden about your plant, the arum italicum.

This arum, sometimes commonly called Italian arum, is a stemless woodland species native to Europe. Typically grows 12-18" tall. It resembles our native Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Arisaema tryphyllum). Each flower consists of (1) an erect, finger-like spadix covered with minute, creamy white flowers and (2) a large, sheath-like, light green spathe (bract) which subtends and partially envelops the spadix like a hood. Flowers produced in spring. Arrowhead-shaped, long-petioled, glossy grayish-green leaves with pale green midribs are 8-12" long. After bloom, the leaves and spathe die back leaving only the thick spadix which develops attractive, bright orange-red berries in summer. New leaves emerge in autumn and remain evergreen in warm winter climates but die back in cold winter climates such as St. Louis where they emerge again in early spring. All parts of this plant are toxic. Posted: 1:52 pm on November 27th
Linneaz writes: You don't show the leaves, but just based on the fruit, I am guessing it is a stinking iris (Iris foetidissima), grown primarily for its showy fruit.

Although showy, it is not a plant you would choose to grow near your garden living areas, as it is aptly named. Posted: 12:34 pm on November 27th
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