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Garden Photo of the Day

Garden Photo of the Day

3 more of Karen's favorite plants (Day 2 of 2 in Karen's garden)

comments (7) November 16th, 2012 in blogs
MichelleGervais Michelle Gervais, Senior Editor
103 users recommend

Although there are a number of dwarf spireas on the market, I still admire Spiraea prunifolia Plena or bridalwreath spirea. At maturity this old fashioned plant flames into a voluminous bonfire every fall. Not for the small garden, but if you have a large area to fill its well worth it. It presents a similar show of bright white for three weeks in spring, when its covered with billions of minuscule double rose-like flowers. 
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Although there are a number of dwarf spireas on the market, I still admire Spiraea prunifolia Plena or bridalwreath spirea. At maturity this old fashioned plant flames into a voluminous bonfire every fall. Not for the small garden, but if you have a large area to fill its well worth it. It presents a similar show of bright white for three weeks in spring, when its covered with billions of minuscule double rose-like flowers. 
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Although there are a number of dwarf spireas on the market, I still admire Spiraea prunifolia Plena or bridalwreath spirea. At maturity this old fashioned plant flames into a voluminous bonfire every fall. Not for the small garden, but if you have a large area to fill its well worth it. It presents a similar show of bright white for three weeks in spring, when its covered with billions of minuscule double rose-like flowers. 
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Im enamored with plants that shine in more than one season, like Viburnum carlesii Compactum, on the right in this photo. Fabulous fall foliage and fragrant spring flowers--what more could you ask? 
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Viburnum carlesii Compactum displaying its sweet scented spring frock. I wish I could dispatch the perfume along with the photos.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Viburnum X juddii, Judd Viburnum, which is a close relative of the compact Viburnum carlesii in the previous pictures.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Hamamelis vernalis with its comely combination of colorful fall foliage and its precocious (occasionally January) bloom habit. All of the witchhazels are wonderful off-season stars that shine in the dark dreary days of fall and winter.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Hamamelis vernalis with its comely combination of colorful fall foliage and its precocious (occasionally January) bloom habit. All of the witchhazels are wonderful off-season stars that shine in the dark dreary days of fall and winter.
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.
Although there are a number of dwarf spireas on the market, I still admire Spiraea prunifolia Plena or bridalwreath spirea. At maturity this old fashioned plant flames into a voluminous bonfire every fall. Not for the small garden, but if you have a large area to fill its well worth it. It presents a similar show of bright white for three weeks in spring, when its covered with billions of minuscule double rose-like flowers. 
2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window. Click the image to enlarge.

Although there are a number of dwarf spireas on the market, I still admire Spiraea prunifolia 'Plena' or bridalwreath spirea. At maturity this old fashioned plant flames into a voluminous bonfire every fall. Not for the small garden, but if you have a large area to fill it's well worth it. It presents a similar show of bright white for three weeks in spring, when it's covered with billions of minuscule double rose-like flowers.

2 WAYS TO ENLARGE! Click directly on the photo to enlarge in a pop-up, or click HERE to see this image, larger, in a new browser window.

Photo: Courtesy of Karen Cherry

As promised, Karen Cherry is sharing 3 more of her favorite landscape plants with us today, each with mulitple seasons of interest. You'll find much more info in the captions. Enjoy! Thanks, Karen, for this plant inspiration. I'll be on the lookout for that spirea in the nursery this spring!

***Hey everyone--we're heading into winter, when GPOD submission tend to be a bit scarce. If you still want to see a new and exciting garden every single weekday in your inbox, do your part and show us YOUR garden! You can email photos to either mgervais@taunton.com or GPOD@taunton.com. Be sure to tell me where you live and tell me a bit about yourself and your garden. And the more photos the better! Thanks!!***

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posted in: Illinois

Comments (7)

tractor1 writes: Newt is a boy! Whew, no kittens... I was getting worried. The Vet said Newt is about 5-7 years old and is in very good shape except for ear mites and an ear infection. The Vet said Newt is not feral, he was probably discarded and was very scared of people. But they were able to handle him with no problem, didn't even need the gloves. All his blood work was clean, no diseases. He now has all his shots and won't need boosters until next year. I left him at the Vet and they will try to fit him in for neutering tomorrow morning, if not Monday. Then they will board him for a day or two before I bring him home. I still need to decide if I'll put him back in his barn or bring him in my house, just not sure how that will work with the five... I have time to mull it over. Was cold here and I've been fighting bronchitis for two weeks now.

Newt:
http://i45.tinypic.com/2a68apw.jpg

Posted: 6:28 pm on November 16th
tractor1 writes: Great fall color. I enjoyed yesterday's dry stream bed and now this treat. I like the bottom photo in the first row, the sky really makes it. Thank you, Karen.

This morning when going out to the barn to feed Newt it looked like Newt is pregnant or maybe getting fed too well. So before winter sets in it'd be best to get Newt to the Vet. I phoned and they said to bring Newt in. I got my Havahart trap set up in the barn with a small can of Fancy Feast with shrimp as bait. I returned an hour later and Newt was trapped. Newt is at the Vet now. The Vet and all the staff but someone to answer the phone was out to lunch. I still don't know if Newt is a boy or a girl. Now you all know as much as I do, next chapter soon. Posted: 2:17 pm on November 16th
pattyspencer writes: I grew up with the bridalwreath spireas around the apartment complex where I lived and after many years of searching my local market found it just 2 years ago. They had several other varieties but not the bridalwreath. Brings back a lot of childhood memories.

Love your pictures today as much as yesterday's - thank you for sharing. Posted: 1:04 pm on November 16th
dadeo1 writes: I appreciate the 2-season photos. So often sites/books show only 1 season and you gotta guess at the other. thanks.

I have a hedge of Prunus glandulosa 'flowering almond' has a similar look, cept the branches are covered in floweres and are, welll, spikey.

again, thanks. may check out my local spireas here in Central Cal. Posted: 12:46 pm on November 16th
wwross writes:

Wow! Beautiful colors on your headline picture! Posted: 9:53 am on November 16th
Wife_Mother_Gardener writes: I love the composition of your first photo, Karen! That grass is killer in front of the Spirea. Beautiful pictures of some beautiful plants! Posted: 8:46 am on November 16th
meander1 writes: Karen, how nice of you to share your sincere enthusiasm for some of your favorite plants. I humbly admit that I was not aware of the fall virtue of the old fashioned bridal wreathe spirea...with it's uplifted tapered branches all aglow,it's truly stunning. You're a very effective plant evangelist since you have made a believer out of me! Posted: 7:50 am on November 16th
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