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Troubleshooting Viburnums

comments (0) January 9th, 2013 in blogs
Antonio_Reis Antonio Reis, Product Manager
10 users recommend

Doublefile viburnum
Doublefile viburnum
Learn to plant a viburnum.
Doublefile viburnum Click the image to enlarge.

Doublefile viburnum

Photo: Reggie Milette

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It's easy to understand why gardeners love viburnums (Viburnum spp. and cvs., USDA Hardiness Zones 2–9). They have lustrous leaves and large (sometimes fragrant) blossoms, and many produce magnificent berries or display outstanding fall color. With traits like these, there is seldom a time that these shrubs aren't looking good at the nursery-and that's why so many of us ending up buying one.

But there are drawbacks to these wonder shrubs: Quite a few are prone to diseases, some struggle with their hardiness, and others can require well-timed pruning. If you already have a viburnum, chances are you might want to know why it's not doing so great, and if you don't have one, you want to make sure to select one that is trouble-free. The editors of Fine Gardening asked experts from across the country to answer common questions regarding viburnums and shed some light on this popular yet beguiling group of plants. Don't invest in one of these shrubs (or rip one out from frustration) until you've read what these experts have to say.

Our cast of experts:

Andrew C. Bell
Curator of the woody-plants collection at the Chicago Botanic Garden in Glencoe, Illinois
Daniel Gilrein
Entomologist at the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, New York
Ed Gregan
Nurseryman and woody-plant specialist for Carlton Plants in Dayton, Oregon
Gary Ladman
Owner of Classic
Viburnums in
Upland, Nebraska
Jeff Gillman
Associate professor in the Department of Horticultural Science at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul
Paul Cappiello
Director of the
Yew Dell Botanical Gardens in Crestwood, Kentucky
Vincent A. Simeone
Director of the Planting Fields Arboretum State Historic Park in Oyster Bay, New York
Stacie Crooks
Garden designer in Seattle, Washington
Todd Lasseigne
Executive director of the Oklahoma Centennial Botanical Garden in Tulsa

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