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Container Plantings for Wintry Settings

comments (1) December 10th, 2011 in blogs
Ruth Ruth
35 users recommend

A cast stone container designed by Scott Endres is one of seven shown below. Read on to see the components identified.
Classic iron urn
Contemporary aluminum cubes
A cast stone container designed by Scott Endres is one of seven shown below. Read on to see the components identified. Click the image to enlarge.

A cast stone container designed by Scott Endres is one of seven shown below. Read on to see the components identified.

Photo: Brandi Spade

Most gardeners store away their pots before winter hits, but not Scott Endres, co-owner of Tangletown Gardens in Minneapolis, Minnesota. When temperatures drop, he fills his containers with eye-catching combos of cold-hardy plants and cuttings. Six of Scott's wintry designs were featured in his article "It's never too cold for containers", published in the November/December 2011 issue of Fine Gardening (#142).

Here are seven more designs, which didn't fit into the article but are too inspiring not to share. You can click on the unnumbered photos to enlarge them.

Traditional iron urn    
 Winter Container 1: Numbered ID    Winter Container 1: Classic Iron Urn (click to enlarge)
1. Preserved Baby Eucalyptus   2. Brunnia   3. Western Red Cedar   4. Princess Pine
5. Yellow Twig Dogwood   6. Peacock Feathers   7. Bleached Kuwa Sticks   8. Fraser Fir  

Cast stone classic    
 Winter Container 2: Numbered ID    Winter Container 2: Cast Stone Classic (click to enlarge)
1. Weeping Willow   2. Princess Pine   3. Bananna Sticks   4. Preserved Eucalyptus
5. Paper Birch Bark   6. Orange Winterberry   7. Western Red Cedar  
8. Dried Fern Fiddleheads   9. Orange Winterberry   10. Black Spruce  
11. Pheasant Feathers   12. Bark-wrapped Wire   13. Buddah Nut Pods
14. Moss-covered Orbs   15. Boxwood   16. Grape Vine  

Contemporary aluminum cubes    
Winter Container 3: Numbered ID    Winter Container 3: Contemporary Aluminum Cubes (click to enlarge)
1. Paper Birch   2. Variegated Boxwood   3. Princess Pine
4. Starfish   5. Noble Fir    6. Polished Black Stones

Double rice bucket    
Winter Container 4: Numbered ID    Winter Container 4: Double Rice Bucket (click to enlarge)
1. Boxwood   2. Paper Birch   3. Orange Winterberry   4. Pheasant Feathers
5. Princess Pine   6. Southern Magnolia   7. Sugar Pine Cones
8. Blue Berried Juniper   9. Insense Cedar   10. Cinnamon Sticks  
11. Polished White Stones

Fiberclay planter    
Winter Container 5: Numbered Id    Winter Container 5: Fiberclay Classic (click to enlarge)
1. Red Twig Dogwood   2. Boxwood   3. Shore Pine
4. Pepperberry Tips   5. Sugar Pine Cones

Faux bois three    
Winter Container 6: Numbered ID    Winter Container 6: Faux Bois Three (click to enlarge)
1. Lemon Cypress   2. Cinnamon Sticks   3. Pepperberry Tips
4. Sequoia Cones   5. Reindeer Moss   6. Spanish Moss

Hypertufa canister    
Winter Container 7: Numbered ID    Winter Container 7: Hypertufa (click to enlarge)
1. Paper Birch Tips   2. Black Spruce   3. Paper Birch Stems
4. Norway Spruce Cones   5. Norway Pine   6. Sugar Pine Cones   7. Manzanita Branch
8. Manzanita Branch



posted in: winter, containers, Endres

Comments (1)

terieLR writes: Okay, so now it's January and I am ready to go out and 'spruce' up these drab window boxes with your fresh ideas! Thank you Scott for sharing your talents! Posted: 10:31 am on January 23rd
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