previous
  • Pantone Color of the Year 2014: Radiant Orchid
    Pantone Color of the Year 2014: Radiant Orchid
  • Black Plants Done Right
    Black Plants Done Right
  • Building Better Borders
    Building Better Borders
  • Get your FREE Everyday Roses download now!
    Get your FREE Everyday Roses download now!
  • 20 Gardenworthy Self-Sowers
    20 Gardenworthy Self-Sowers
  • 3 Ways to Design with Containers
    3 Ways to Design with Containers
  • Homegrown / Homemade
    Homegrown / Homemade
  • NEW Video Series: There's a Better Way
    NEW Video Series: There's a Better Way
  • Using Containers as Elements of a Design
    Using Containers as Elements of a Design
  • Garden Design Basics
    Garden Design Basics
  • 10 Seed-Starting Tips
    10 Seed-Starting Tips
  • DIY A-Frame Veggie Trellis
    DIY A-Frame Veggie Trellis
  • Go Green on the Patio
    Go Green on the Patio
  • Plant Finder: Spring Plants
    Plant Finder: Spring Plants
  • Bold and Beautiful Zinnias
    Bold and Beautiful Zinnias
  • Rex Begonias
    Rex Begonias
  • Pick Plants for Fragrance
    Pick Plants for Fragrance
  • Planting the Right Way
    Planting the Right Way
  • Indoor Seed Starting Materials List
    Indoor Seed Starting Materials List
  • Seed Starting in Speedling Trays
    Seed Starting in Speedling Trays
  • How to Grow Mustard
    How to Grow Mustard
  • 10 Combinations for Shade
    10 Combinations for Shade
next

Build a Rain Barrel

Rain barrels save money and time, and the benefits to the environment are many

Length: 5:35

The benefits to having a rain barrel are huge. First, water in your rain barrel is not subject to community watering restrictions and has no additives like fluoride or iron to irritate your plants. Second, your water bill will be smaller. Third, a rain barrel helps reduce problems associated with storm-water runoff.

In this video, Fine Gardening senior editor Danielle Sherry builds a rain barrel for under $50 using homeowner power tools: a power drill with a 15/16-inch spade bit to cut the hole for the faucet and a 2-1/4-inch hole saw to cut the hole for the overflow outlet, along with a jigsaw to cut a hole in the top of the barrel.

Click here for a printable parts checklist.

Special thanks to Rebecca Chesin for her guidance and instructions. Read more about her adventures at http://tylertork.com/diyrainbarrels/construction.html.

Shot by: Kate Geruntho Frank; Edited by: Cari Delahanty