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A portable potting operation

Because clay, wood, and ceramic pots filled with soil and plants can be heavy to move, I’ve developed a portable potting operation that allows me to plant pots in their final destination rather than at a remote potting bench.

The key to my operation is a wheelbarrow dedicated solely for this purpose. I fill it with potting soil, mixing in other amendments (such as compost, slow-release fertilizer, and water-retention polymers) with a shovel, and roll it around from pot to pot. I can also roll it to the nearest hose to moisten the soil.

I keep a small shovel, a trowel, and a pair of gloves in the wheelbarrow for convenience. And I can even place a few plants on top to transport them to their appropriate pot. At the end of the day, I simply roll the wheelbarrow back in the shed and cover the soil with a drop cloth to help keep it moist.

Lee Anne White, Trumbull, CT

From Fine Gardening 72, pp. 10