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Clever storage for coiled hoses

An inexpensive and easy way to keep these popular hoses neat and tidy

Click to enlarge image Photo/Illustration: courtesy of Colby Feller
Coiled hoses are popular because they are self-retracting and take up little space. But like coiled phone cords, their coils can become tangled, making it difficult to pull the hose where you need it; it also makes it difficult to make the hose look neat when it’s not in use. An inexpensive and easy way to store a coiled hose is to stick a PVC (polyvinyl chloride) pipe securely in the ground, then slide the coils over the top. You could also use a sturdy wooden stake, which could be painted or left natural, or a copper pipe, which will age to a beautiful patina.
—Colby Feller, New York, New York
From Fine Gardening 148 , pp. 12