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Garden Photo of the Day

READER PHOTOS! Cynthia’s garden in Rwanda–MORE

We have a beautiful old acacia tree near the drive — it's one of the iconic trees of Africa.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
We have a beautiful old acacia tree near the drive — it's one of the iconic trees of Africa. 
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
We have a beautiful old acacia tree near the drive — it's one of the iconic trees of Africa. 
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
The house has 4 long flower/shrub borders.  This one is in the lower area along the lawn.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
The lower lawn of the front garden with flower/shrub borders on both sides and a nice view of the city.  The lightposts are not great; I'm thinking of painting them very dark brown or green.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
Borders along the upper area of the front garden, near the terrace.  Full of pretty flowering shrubs, but I will probably move a lot of things to take down the height (for a better view of the city) and discourage the mosquitoes that hide in the bushes and then come out when we have guests. 
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
We have 2 large traveller's palms.  I got very interested in the color/texture/pattern of their fanning stems.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
We have 2 large traveller's palms.  I got very interested in the color/texture/pattern of their fanning stems.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
Glory bower (Clerodendron sp.) — I had never seen it before.  Apparently, it was popular in Victorian hothouses. 
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
Not yet identified. 
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
Not yet identified, but it smells wonderful at night. 
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
Not yet identifed 
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
We have a beautiful old acacia tree near the drive — it's one of the iconic trees of Africa.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
We have a beautiful old acacia tree near the drive — it's one of the iconic trees of Africa. 
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
We have a beautiful old acacia tree near the drive — it's one of the iconic trees of Africa. 
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
The house has 4 long flower/shrub borders.  This one is in the lower area along the lawn.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
The lower lawn of the front garden with flower/shrub borders on both sides and a nice view of the city.  The lightposts are not great; I'm thinking of painting them very dark brown or green.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
Borders along the upper area of the front garden, near the terrace.  Full of pretty flowering shrubs, but I will probably move a lot of things to take down the height (for a better view of the city) and discourage the mosquitoes that hide in the bushes and then come out when we have guests. 
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
We have 2 large traveller's palms.  I got very interested in the color/texture/pattern of their fanning stems.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
We have 2 large traveller's palms.  I got very interested in the color/texture/pattern of their fanning stems.
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
Glory bower (Clerodendron sp.) — I had never seen it before.  Apparently, it was popular in Victorian hothouses. 
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
Not yet identified. 
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
Not yet identified, but it smells wonderful at night. 
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson
Not yet identifed 
Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Cynthia Goodson

Remember back on Monday, when Cynthia Goodson shared the cool cycad in her garden in Rwanda? Well, I begged her for photos of the rest of the garden, and she sent some in! Cynthia wants to stress that she can't take any credit for the garden, since she just moved there in September, but she does have plans to leave her own mark. She says, "Although it is full of wonderful plants, I actually feel the garden needs some changes to give better focus to certain plants and areas. But I've been taking it slow and getting to know the place — and enjoying how pretty and lush it already is." Thanks, Cynthia, for satisfying our craving for a wider view of you garden. We can't wait to see what you do! (Though…I have to say…I like the lamp posts just the way they are–they really pop against the foliage!) 
***See the captions for more info. There are a few plants that Cynthia hasn't quite identified yet. If you can help her out, please comment below!***

*****Remember to check out Cynthia's fascinating blog, enclos*ure.*****

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Comments

  1. lijda 02/22/2012

    I love the texture of the plants. I had stopped growing conservatory plants when I stopped heating a small greenhouse I have, but now I think I'll have to return to them since I KNOW I can't grow these outdoors in the Northeast. (And this winter I'd have been able to afford to heat the greenhouse.) Thank you so for sending these pictures, I'm motivated in a whole new direction now. I'm not sure, but I think the flowering plant with blue and white flowers is a Brunfelsa.

  2. User avater
    meander1 (Michaele ) 02/22/2012

    What beautiful sweeping grounds and views. It must be such a treat to get up each day and do a "walkabout" (wrong country but you know what I mean). I love how lush and colorful everything it.

  3. tractor1 02/22/2012

    I'm wondering if Cynthia will be tending to the plantation grounds herself or as is typical in third world countries the "haves" maintain native staff; housekeepers who also go into town to shop, a driver, grounds keepers, and of course security. I know first hand that in tropical climes the bush grows much too quickly for one or even two to keep the jungle at bay. That property appears much too large and involved for just one person to tend to it. And trimming the vegetation will do nothing to keep the mosquito population down (biters love lawns), people wear protective clothing and avail themselves of screened lanais and sleep under netting. In town the locals deal with insects by having zero vegetation and using smoke. Beware the tropical sun.

  4. Lisianne 02/22/2012

    I had to travel to Malaysia on a business trip a few years ago. I was entranced by the palms like the traveller's palm shown here. The symmetry and grace of such a huge plant was amazing! I also loved the fact that our "big box store" plants grow naturally over there. Looked so odd to see them outside! (I'm a former zone 5 now zone 6 resident.)

  5. Steve_FLL_ATL 02/22/2012

    I believe the flowering shrub in photo #10 with the lavender and white flowers is a brunfelsia latifolia - yesterday-today-and-tomorrow shrub.

    Good to see some a tropical garden with a look we rarely see in colder climes (except perhaps with an occasional houseplant!).

  6. rubybegonia 02/22/2012

    Thank you for sharing such a beautiful, beautiful garden paradise! The blue flower with the dark green/black foliage is stunning and I would love to know what it is.

  7. Punkin65 02/22/2012

    The good smelling flower in Cynthia's garden has a common name of yesterday today and tomorrow.,because of the three colors on the plant.
    Brunfelsa is the proper name of the shrub from Brazil.

  8. User avater
    Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 02/22/2012

    I, too, was smitten with the blue flowered shrub. It looks like it is Eranthemum nervosum/Eranthemum pulchellum. Now, where to find it and can it take being grown in a container...... :)

  9. Cindy_at_enclos_ure 02/22/2012

    Dear all, Thanks for all the plant IDs for our Rwanda garden. I just discovered that the shrub with the small orange flowers and white bracts is Mussaenda frondosa. The lamp posts do pop, but they are Victorian and the house is not. Oh, well.

  10. GreenGrowler 02/22/2012

    Beautiful tropical paradise! I wholeheartedly agree with you, Cynthia; the white lampposts are jarring in an otherwise serene landscape and don't exactly fit the style. I would paint them a bronzey-dark brown, and also change out the round bulbs. This was a great respite from our brown winter scene, thanks.

  11. GreenGrowler 02/22/2012

    Just a quick note to RubyBegonia - Apologies as this is off-topic, but my French Bulldog's name is Ruby-Petunia! Although, I like the sound of RubyBegonia!

  12. cstewart12 02/22/2012

    Not only is the landscaping lovely, but the photography is excellent too..

  13. MoonSoul 02/22/2012

    Hello, The plant that is pictured on the right 2nd from bottom is called a "Yesterday, today, & tomorrow" due to the flowers changing 3 colors of purple. I have one in my yard. Not sure of the correct name, but that is always what I've know it as.......I'll try to find the correct name.
    Lot's of beautiful plants in her yard. I'd like to find out what the other unidentified ones are...........?

  14. shirleyjean 02/22/2012

    Thank goodness she took pictures and sent them in so we could see, because it seems that the lady of the house will change something perfect so she can put her claim on it. I hope she thinks twice about that because it is truly beautiful as it is.

  15. nightjasmine 02/22/2012

    the purple coloured flower is Brunfelsia, commonly called yesterday,today,tommorrow.i have one in a container and it gets a little extra care and never fails to repay.

  16. Cindy_at_enclos_ure 02/22/2012

    Don't worry ShirleyJean. My plans for the garden mainly include opening up the area around the Acacia tree somewhat to emphasize it; setting out some more cycads; widening the flower/shrub beds along the lawn; exchanging too tall, over-clipped shrubs near the terrace for mixed perenials; planting some of those flowering shrubs (with more room for them to spread out) around the front drive; expanding the vegetable garden, especially with herbs and fruit trees. As I learn more about Rwandan native plants, I would like to include more of those too.

    Thanks so much again for the plant IDs!

  17. pattyspencer 02/23/2012

    It's really neat to see plants from another country. They are just beautiful - as it the garden itself! And I like those white lamp posts just the way they are.

  18. soilgoil 02/23/2012

    Cynthia, I so enjoyed viewing your lush tropical garden. I've had the pleasure of living and gardening in Hawai'i, and share your love of cycads and palms. However, you say that you plan to grow herbs. A word of warning: when I first began gardening in Hawai'i I sowed an entire packet of basil seeds, unaware that the tropical weather and volcanic soil would rapidly turn my herb bed into six-foot tall basil forest!

  19. janetsfolly 02/24/2012

    What a lovely escape! I gardened in the Caribbean for 23 years and enjoyed many of these plants - Glory Bower was a mass under the stairs to our second level beach house (for the breeze!) but on St. Croix it was called Danish Banner. (The Danes owned the US Virgin Islands prior to selling them to us.)My 2 cents...paint the lamp posts brown/bronze. They'll blend with their background and the globes will seem to float in the foliage, especially at dusk/cocktail time. I wish you good luck and Godspeed with the bush and the bugs, dear! Dreams are for following.

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