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Garden Photo of the Day

Plant Portraits

Tulipa humilis

A plant portrait is worth a thousand hopes! Thanks to Tim Vojt in Columbus, Ohio for reminding us of that!

"With the dips into freezing temperatures lately, I don't have any wide garden views that are especially photo-worthy, but there are plenty of spring happenings that I think are worth a plant-portrait."

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corydalis fumarifolia ssp azurea

daffodil

daffodils miniature

daffodils

Magnolia Genie

Muscari latifolium

Podophyllum pleianthum

Polystichum setiferum

Sedum Angelina

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Comments

  1. user-7007498 04/19/2016

    Tim: The photos are so cool. Seeing plants closeup in pictures often reveal incredible features that our eyes miss when we see the plants in the landscape. Ferns are probably my favorite as they emerge. They always look like some weird, hairy alien creature emerging from the ground.

    Spring is indeed here. Months of gardening nirvana to come. Thanks for sharing.

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      Thanks, Kevin. We had summer here yesterday, but back to spring. I love those fern crosiers, they are amazing. The ones in the picture here froze and are little, papery tumbleweeds now. I doubt the fern will die, but I've never had that happen before and wonder how it will recover... :(

  2. jeffgoodearth 04/19/2016

    well, Tim deMille, all of those plants were definitely ready for their closeups. Love those fiddleheads and why do I not grow Corydalis?!!?!? Spring has arrived and it's now a race here and I can't keep up.

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      You said it. I only work on my own garden and I can't keep up. I'm guessing you don't grow Corydalis because they die in the heat you and I get. I've tried just about ever flexuosa, elata and hybrid and they all peter out here in the heat. This beauty is a spring ephemeral and sleeps through the heat and seems to be steadily increasing each year. Love it. I've gotten a scoop on some Lithuanian and Latvian mail order sources for a lot of hard-to-find Corydalis. I can't find a lot here in the states. Enjoy your garden when your work is done!

  3. Jay_Sifford 04/19/2016

    Tim, I think taking photographs is one of my favorite things to do in my garden. Kevin Kelly is right: you see such details that can go unnoticed when they photographs, and doing so is good training for the eye. I'm loving your podophyllum. I have several more Chinese ones coming soon. Aren't they wonderful? Happy gardening!

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      Thanks, Jay. Keep me posted on your Podo's and how they do. This P. pleianthum is the first one I bought and it has sailed through bitter winters and hot summers. This is the first year it will bloom, so I'm hoping I'll start to get some more shoots in the gardening years to come!

  4. katieerb 04/19/2016

    Tiny treasures always make me smile, these shots are wonderful, thanks for sharing!

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      Thanks, Katie. Sometimes I appreciate them more in a photo than I do in person!

  5. NCYarden 04/19/2016

    Way to put a spotlight on some Spring rockstars, Tim. Nothing like the stroll through the garden to see plants excited for the growing season. Can never get enough ferns. Great photos.

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      Some of these really were rockstars this year, David. It was a relief to see that Corydalis flop when the temps dropped to the mid-20's and then spring back to life when the weather warmed. I do love me a fern-we'll see how the ferns that froze solid recover this year........

      1. NCYarden 04/19/2016

        I bet they'll recover...prehistoric champs! And if not, come on down and dig some up. You coming for Plant Delights open House? If so, give me a shout, I'm just down the road.

        1. User avater
          Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

          I'll definitely let you know the next time we head to Raleigh. The quick funeral trip we did used up our vacation time-but we'll be back sometime!

  6. wGardens 04/19/2016

    Great photos, Tim! Wow, that corydalis sure is riveting! Love the rock~ what does it "read"?

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      Thanks Margaret. I'm in love with the Corydalis, but since it is summer dormant I have to be careful to not dig it up in the summer. I can't remember what the stone stone says. Something about Peaceful. Cherry (Perennially Crazy) translated it for me, but I can't find where I wrote it down.

  7. User avater
    meander1 (Michaele ) 04/19/2016

    Love these photos, Tim. Your fuzzy wuzzy fern fiddleheads have so much personality...it's as if they should each have a name and be thought of as a pet. And the closeup of your Podophyllum pleianthum is enthralling..are those actually little flower buds showing up between the leaves or are my eyes being fooled? So glad your ground has come alive and is allowing your treasures to burst forth..

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      Thanks, Michaele. I think spring is actually happening in Ohio. I was sharing below that those fiddleheads are toast after being frozen. The Podophyllum is now showing a little damage on the leaves, too. It is going to bloom for the first time. They are very strange when they emerge from the ground, flower buds first. then the leaves slowly outpace the flowers to make a big umbrella over them to hide the flowers away! These won't be too showy, but there's another I have (P. Spotty Dotty) whose flowers are like dark, flowing streamers!

      1. Meelianthus 04/19/2016

        How long did it take for 'Spotty Dotty' to bloom Tim? Mine is in it's second year but no flowers - but that's okay as the leaves are so amazing.

        1. User avater
          Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

          My Spotty Dotty must be the same age as yours, so it's going to bloom now in it's second year. It might not be a great bloom, yet. The Podophyllums are still relatively new to me, so I don't have a lot of personal experience. It's a killer plant and I've seen amazing photos of blooming clumps that are swoon-worthy.

      2. User avater
        meander1 (Michaele ) 04/19/2016

        Ouch, Tim, dagger to the heart... thinking of those adorable fiddleheads all bundled up in their cozy sweaters getting zapped by the cold. It just doesn't seem fair. I've never had that happen either so I will be interested to hear how much the ferns recover.

        1. User avater
          Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

          I know, right? It's a hardy fern and I thought for sure the little fur coats would protect them. All of my Japanese painted ferns got nipped as well. Pins and needles.....

  8. VikkiVA 04/19/2016

    What great pictures. Thanks Tim! Vikki in VA

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      Thanks, Vikki! I made a quick stop in Williamsburg last month. Your garden in Virginia must be going full speed by now!

      1. VikkiVA 04/20/2016

        Williamsburg is one of my favorite places to go. I'm south on the NC border in Chesapeake. The garden is rebounding after an early April frost and we have had such windy days. I've got crispy hydrangeas and light damage to ferns, etc. Praying that the hydrangea will bloom this year. Vikki in VA

  9. Dvngardener 04/19/2016

    Close up and personal! I love it. The pops of color are just gorgeous. Sometimes I forget how much one little thing can be.

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      Thanks, Lily. Spring is definitely a time when I'm not choosy about color. The more color the better after winter.

  10. hontell 04/19/2016

    fun photos, Tim, great work

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      Many thanks, Howard. Enjoy your spring.

  11. user-7007960 04/19/2016

    Love these little vignettes! Wonderful variety and colors... The daffodils are luscious. Thank you!
    Carol

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      Thanks, Carol. Those daffs are definitely some of my favorites. I love the coral color.

      1. nenitafranck 04/19/2016

        I'm in the PNW also....on the central Oregon Coast. My daffs haven't bloomed for a few years now. They were beautiful the first year. I don't have much direct sun. I don't fertilize. What's your secret?

        1. User avater
          Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

          Hi Nenita. I guess I just have the right conditions. Most of mine get close to full sun and our winters are the necessary cold (zone 6 ish). How low do your temps dip in winter? Other than that, I put up with the ripening foliage until it is yellow so that the bulbs form next year's flowers and occasionally I divide the clumps, because if they get too jam packed, they don't bloom. Helpful?

  12. User avater
    Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

    Thanks, Diane. I don't go anywhere without my iPhone 5! I don't like to carry a camera, but I always always have my phone. Not good for professional photography, but it does a pretty good job!

  13. User avater
    Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

    Thanks Lillian!!

  14. Sheila_Schultz 04/19/2016

    As always, Tim, your photos make me smile, but there is just something about spring buds, blooms and fresh new leaves that are especially sweet. Your corydalis fumarifolia is a delight... even though the odds may be against successfully growing here, I may just have to give it a shot. I love that delicate beauty!

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      You might just give C. fumarifolia a try, Sheila. It's summer dormant, so that might help it cope with the continental climate. I know there are two different groups of ephemeral Corydalis: one that doesn't like to dry out when dormant, the other that doesn't mind. Don't know which this is, but I'll see if I can find the list I am remembering.

      1. Sheila_Schultz 04/19/2016

        Now I have to find the right spot that has a possibility of being just right... once the snow melts, that is! I think I'm going to have to start paying you as my very own personal researcher! Love it ;) Thanks Tim!

        1. User avater
          Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

          There's no cost up front. What I need to do is have nurseries give me a cut of the sales I generate for them! :)

          1. Sheila_Schultz 04/19/2016

            We can probably work something out, hmmmmm....

  15. user-6536305 04/19/2016

    Very sharp photos and that corydalis fumarifolia ssp azurea is so impressive? Did you sow by seeds? Thanks for sharing.

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      Thanks, Lillian. That little Corydalis treasure was purchased as a plant from Far Reaches Farm a couple of years ago. I love that nursery!

  16. GrannyMay 04/19/2016

    Great portraits, Tim! I hope the frost hasn't damaged the ferns beyond repair and that your Podophyllum pleianthum continues to look fantastic. Loving the shiny look of it, I'm tempted to give it a try, but we are so bone dry in the summer that I really should not.

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      Thanks, May! PNW is almost the only place where the Chinese Podophyllum are readily available, so I know a lot of folks grow them out your way. Maybe they irrigate, or maybe they are drought-tolerant. They are plants of the deciduous woodland and often those cope with summer dry. Or you could do a container. Loree Bohl of Danger Garden has an enormous clump in a galvanized metal tank (I think) and they are amazing. You know you want to try it....... :)

      1. GrannyMay 04/19/2016

        Of course I want to try it, BUT where would I put it!! My deck and other places are already full of containers and I managed to have 100% germination of the 18 Ricinus seeds I started, so I've been giving them away bit by bit. I'll keep 3. I'm seriously running out of space.

        1. User avater
          Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

          It's so much fine trying new things that it's hard to stop. Every autumn, when I'm hauling in containers, I tell myself 'no more tender container plants', and yet I just potted up a new one: Mangave 'Kaleidoscope'. Very little will power here.
          I have a hard time killing seedlings when I have too many. Good luck with the gifting.

          1. GrannyMay 04/19/2016

            I'll have no problem with gifting the Ricinus. It is not generally available here, so there are plenty of takers. :) Yes, it is hard to stop wanting to try new plants. If I don't see it, I'm not likely to want it. I almost Googled Mangave 'Kaleidoscope', knowing that if it overcame your willpower it must be special.

          2. Schatzi 04/19/2016

            Me too! another way of looking at it - we have lots of will power - it's the won't power we run short of...

          3. User avater
            meander1 (Michaele ) 04/20/2016

            Oh, I love that play on words, Shirley and it is so true for many of us with our plant buying...and buying!

          4. User avater
            Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/20/2016

            Truer words were never spoken, Shirley. I'm going to be sharing that distinction with every one I know!

  17. Meelianthus 04/19/2016

    Oh Tim! I always wonder how you find room in your garden for all of the new things you talk about trying. Isn't it grand when things start popping up. I just keep stuffing into my small gardens as I just can't stay out of the nurseries! I think you must do the same. I have always loved the Muscari, but all of your things are so choice, really lovely.

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      Thanks, Linda. We are definitely peas in a pod. I just keep cramming things in or moving them around to make room. I'm still at a point in my garden where I have multiples of things I don't necessarily love....so they get replaced.
      M. latifolium is very cool and although it's been reliable, I don't think I've had much increase. That's fine. I'm still yanking out lots of the common grape hyacinth, which is definitely a beautiful weed!

      1. Meelianthus 04/19/2016

        "Yanking", ya that's a good one. I find myself doing a lot of that for plants that are misbehaving!

  18. User avater
    Linda on Whidbey 04/19/2016

    Nice photos, Tim. Love that Podophyllum and find it amazing that there are so many interesting types of the lowly Mayapple. They were always our way of figuring out when to look for Morels in WI, but have now become prized garden plants. That's a sweet little Corydalis, too.

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/19/2016

      Thanks, Linda! Morels were common breakfast fare for my parents in Iowa, way back when. Now, who can afford them. I guess it's the same with the lowly mayapple. P. peltatum - common as dirt; the Chinese species and hybrids - destroying my plant budget! I should hold some sort of memorial service for every time something very pricey up and dies in my garden......but that would be an all-too-common occurrence.

  19. user-4297063 04/19/2016

    Love these photos Tim, spring is a wonderful time of year, so fresh, and full of life..!!

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/20/2016

      Thanks Kay. This is time of year when I wish I were a little more full of life and energy to keep up!

  20. Cenepk10 04/20/2016

    Gorgeous.... Breaks me heart Tim has freezing temps when he loves his plants so....😢

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/20/2016

      Aww! Thanks for the sympathy. Time marches on and spring is moving forward. No freezing temps in the extended forecast!

  21. JaneEliz 04/25/2016

    Stunning portraits, Tim! Esp. love your podophyllum, but everything is lovely.

    1. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 04/25/2016

      Thanks Jane. I'm crazy about the Podo, too. Unfortunately it has a few blemishes now from the freezes we had, so it's not going to be perfection this year! Only close.....

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