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Garden Photo of the Day

It’s not too early to think about late spring

Next season will be here sooner than you think (or at least it always seems that way).

Today’s GPOD comes to us from Karen Cormier of Scarborough, Ontario:
“These are pictures of late spring when the daffodils, tulips, and forget-me-nots of spring have retreated and the purples and pinks of early summer are coming into full bloom. The border is interspersed with tiny clumps of pink carnations and coral bells, while the garden’s blooms include bachelor buttons, bleeding hearts, and large alum. The yellows of the daylilies, variegated yucca, gold-tipped euonymus, and golden cotoneaster provide a soft contrast to the pinks and lilacs.  
We love our hostas for their diversity of size and colour. They do well in almost any condition but we find the lighter varieties do better in shade, while the deeper blues perform well in sunnier locations. Overhanging the hostas is a standard weeping willow. It gets a “brush cut” in early spring and a few trims during summer to keep its shape. Across from the hostas is a group of white cotoneaster, not yet in bloom.  The final picture is in late spring when the pink azalea and bleeding hearts are in full bloom, with a few daffodils and tulips hanging on.”

Have a garden you'd like to share? Email 5-10 high-resolution photos (there is no need to reduce photo sizing before sending—simply point, shoot and send the photos our way) and a brief story about your garden to GPOD@taunton.com. Please include where you're located!

Sending photos in separate emails to the GPOD email box is just fine.

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View Comments


  1. frankgreenhalgh 12/06/2017

    Hello Karen - Your garden looks so wonderfully lush, healthy and colourful (including nice shades of green). Down here in Aussie land we have just experienced our late spring, and here are the flowers and gum nuts of a plant you may not be familiar with - it's called silver princess (Eucalyptus caesia), which is starting to be used as a street tree as well as a feature tree in gardens here. Hope it is of interest. Cheers from Oz

    1. user-7007498 12/06/2017

      Thanks, Frank, for keeping us updated with the beautiful trees and flowers from down under. I remain in awe of the plants you have shown us. In the second picture, is that the bark of the tree in the background? It looks really interesting as well.

      1. frankgreenhalgh 12/06/2017

        Yes Kev. that is the trunk of this street tree. The older bark is being shed - annual event. The younger branches and twigs have the white powdery appearance. Cheers, Frank

    2. User avater
      Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 12/06/2017

      So beautiful, Frank. Those petal-less flowers pushing off their caps hold endless fascination for me. Thanks for posting.

      1. frankgreenhalgh 12/06/2017

        Glad you like gum trees, Tim.

    3. Sheila_Schultz 12/06/2017

      I'll never tire of the gorgeous flowers from the varied eucalyptus trees... tu-tu designers should take note of these particular beauties! Keep 'em coming Frank!

      1. frankgreenhalgh 12/06/2017

        Thanks Sheila. - you and Michaele think alike. Cheers, Frank

    4. User avater
      Linda on Whidbey 12/06/2017

      You have the most unusual plants in OZ, Frank. How can we compete? Do these eucalyptus get the rainbow bark as they mature? The silver bells against the peeling bark is beautiful.

      1. frankgreenhalgh 12/06/2017

        Hey Linda -yes the shedding of the bark on older trees (to allow for growth) exposes the nice colouration of the new bark

    5. user-6536305 12/06/2017

      Wow, this looks so odd and yet so beautiful! Need to make it to Aussie land someday soon. Was not on my first must to see list but now is.

      1. frankgreenhalgh 12/06/2017

        Glad you changed your mind Lilian. Let me know when you are coming so I can organise the reception. Regards, Frank

    6. Cenepk10 12/06/2017

      Wowsa !!!!

    7. User avater
      meander1 (Michaele ) 12/06/2017

      Just recently attended a children's ballet recital and, as Sheila referenced, those flowers make perfect tu-tus...so adorable...yes, the flowers above and the children in the recital.

      1. frankgreenhalgh 12/06/2017

        Again you and Sheila are on the same wavelength, Michaele. Good team work!

  2. sandyprowse 12/06/2017

    I took one look at the first picture shown and said to my dog: "Wow, that's Karen's garden!" I will say it is even better in person. It is breathtaking. However Karen, you neglected the gorgeous back garden wall which was a challenge and the readers would enjoy. That should be sent in next! Congratulations Karen and Rollin!

    Your friend, Sandy Prowse
    Toronto Canada.

  3. User avater
    meander1 (Michaele ) 12/06/2017

    I'm fascinated by your 3rd picture containing what you describe as a "standard weeping willow". I often see this dappled leaf variety offered for sale in the spring and wonder what it will look like when it gets more mature. It looks like you have found the sweet spot with your spring pruning for making it very garden friendly and visually beautiful. It really complements the clump of variegated hosta and adds height and extra sparkle to your pathway. Thanks for the inspiration.

  4. Chris N 12/06/2017

    Hi Karen! What a wonderful garden. I like the full, lush look of both the sun and shade beds. What is the statue in the front garden? I couldn't quite make out what it was.

  5. User avater
    Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 12/06/2017

    You've got me wishing for spring with your beautiful garden, Karen. The border with the willow is chock-full of planty goodness!

  6. Sheila_Schultz 12/06/2017

    I love your gardens, Karen... They are filled to the brim with glorious pops of color and delightful textures! Oh, and those hosta's are perfect in their place! After reading Sandy's post, add me to the list of GPOD'ers that are curious about your backyard gardens!

  7. carolineyoungwilliams 12/06/2017

    Karen, I love your garden. Your use of color and texture is beautiful. I look forward to seeing more photos of your garden. Thanks for sharing.

  8. User avater
    Linda on Whidbey 12/06/2017

    Hi Karen, thanks for getting us all excited for spring with your colorful gardens. It sounds like we would enjoy your backyard , as well, so maybe you will post some of those, too.

  9. user-6536305 12/06/2017

    Your garden is so full and so lush. Thanks for sharing Karen an outstanding Canadian garden!

  10. Cenepk10 12/06/2017

    Gorgeous Gardens, gorgeous neighborhood, Gorgeous SPRING !!!!! Phooey on winter.

  11. 2bakeornot2bake 12/06/2017

    Karen As winter is just setting in, these photos are a welcome respite and reminder of warmer/prettier days to return. (My garden feeling very bleak at the moment). Thanks for sharing!!

  12. user-7008735 12/07/2017

    Beautiful photos, Karen! I especially love the view of the border alongside the path with the peonies getting ready to burst open at the back. Peony time is my favourite!

  13. cynthiamccain 12/08/2017

    Beautiful, Karen! I love the alliums and hosta in your garden—so healthy looking!

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