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Garden Photo of the Day

Heat Lovers

A Water-wise garden

The red flowers of Sedum spurium (Dragon's blood stonecrop, Zones 3 – 8) seen through the foliage and flowers of Helictotrichon sempervirens (blue oat grass, Zones 4 - 8).

Today’s garden photos come from our friend Cherry Ong. She writes,

“A lot of my gardening friends are pining for summer so I thought I would share photos of a garden we serendipitously discovered on our way back from a road trip last summer.

The garden is located in Revelstoke, British Columbia, Canada and is called Gardens at the Gallery. The xeriscape garden was created in 2015 by the Revelstoke Visual Arts Society, North Columbia Environmental Society and Revestoke Local Food Initiative. Concept design is by Fraser Blyth and landscape design is by Gaila Hemphill.

There is an edible garden adjacent to the xeriscape garden. It is the Revelstoke Visual Arts Centre Community Garden, a vegetable and fruit tree garden planted, cared for and harvested by members of the Revelstoke Local Food Initiative. The food in this garden feeds many families in Revelstoke as well as their local food bank.

I hope you are all hanging in there till planting season returns.  I know I am.”

 

Layers of color provided by Sedum repestre ‘Angelina’ (Angelina stonecrop, Zones 3 – 11), Echinacea purpurea ‘Magnus’ (purple coneflower, Zones 3 – 8), and Dianthus gratianopolitanus ‘Firewitch’ (Cheddar pink, Zones 4 – 8).
A sculpture called “Blowin’ in the Wind’ by artist John McKinnon is backed by Lavandula angustifolia ‘Hidcote’ (English lavender, zones 5 – 8), Liatris spicata ‘Kobold’ (blazing star, zones 3 – 8), Achillea ‘Moonshine’ (yarrow, zones 3 – 8), and Sedum repestre ‘Angelina’.
Another view of the sculpture, with Achillea ‘Moonshine’ (yarrow, zones 3 – 8) in the foreground.
The red flowers of Sedum spurium (Dragon’s blood stonecrop, Zones 3 – 8) backed up by purple Lavandula angustifolia ‘Hidcote’ (English lavender, Zones 5 – 8), Liatris spicata ‘Kobold’ (blazing star, Zones 3 – 8) and a dark leaved Physocarpus opulifolius (ninebark, Zones 2 – 8).
The adjacent vegetable garden stocks the local food bank and boasts quite a wonderful view.

 

Have a garden you’d like to share? Email 5-10 high-resolution photos (there is no need to reduce photo sizing before sending—simply point, shoot and send the photos our way) and a brief story about your garden to GPOD@taunton.com. Please include where you’re located!

Sending photos in separate emails to the GPOD email box is just fine.

Have a mobile phone? Tag your photos on Instagram or Twitter with #FineGardening!

You don’t have to be a professional garden photographer – check out our garden photography tips!

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Comments

  1. User avater
    Kevin Kelly 02/08/2018

    Good morning, Cherry. What an absolute jewel of a garden and a fabulous find on your road trip. I love the textures and contrast and the view from the veg garden is terrific. Sedum 'Angelina' is one of my favorite groundcovers. Thanks for brightening up my day.

    1. PerenniallyCrazy 02/12/2018

      Chiming in late but thanks for your kind words. Missed this post in its entirely as I was at the NWFGS. It was fun and enjoyed meeting up with some of our GPOD friends IRL.

  2. user-3565112 02/08/2018

    Good morning Ms. Org, Thank you for your timely post this morning These terrific gardens include lots of plants that are readily available in this area. We are planning a garden in the N.W. edge of my yard & photo number 5 is helpful for the front of the border.
    Thank you & good luck this spring, Joe

    1. PerenniallyCrazy 02/12/2018

      Thanks Joe. Happy gardening!

  3. Jeff Goodearth 02/08/2018

    Cherry, you always find the best stuff ! Or maybe you have the eye to see what others don't. Either way the garden and the photos are super.

    1. PerenniallyCrazy 02/12/2018

      Thanks Jeff - chiming in late but thanks for your kind words. Missed this post in its entirely as I was at the NWFGS (with no wifi access) but I think you already knew that.

  4. User avater
    meander1 (Michaele ) 02/08/2018

    A lesson that jumps out at me from these pictures is Don't Be Afraid to Plant Lots of the Same. Of course, it helps to have a such a generous footprint to fill but the pleasing impression of the masses of the different perennials is very soothing to the eye. And, it's nice when a public garden not only feeds the soul but also feeds, literally.

    1. PerenniallyCrazy 02/12/2018

      You always know the right thing to say Michaele! Thanks for your kind words. Missed this post in its entirely as I was at the NWFGS. It was fun and enjoyed meeting up with some of our GPOD friends IRL.

  5. Maggieat11 02/08/2018

    What a great garden to discover. The use of the grasses is nice also. And I love the fact that food is provided for the community.

    One day closer to Spring..... :-) !!

    1. PerenniallyCrazy 02/12/2018

      Yehey! Gotta love those spring countdowns.

  6. Chris N 02/08/2018

    I don't think I'll ever make it up that way so thanks for sharing this garden. It's fun to find hidden gems like this. And I agree, that is a great view from the community garden.

    1. PerenniallyCrazy 02/12/2018

      Chiming in late. Didn't even see this post but I guess it was because we were together at the NWFGS (with no wifi access for me) - but I couldn't have thought of a better way to spend my day or part of my day there. It was great seeing you!

  7. User avater
    Tim_Zone_Denial_Vojt 02/08/2018

    Having woken up to 15F/-9C, I'm feeling like a heat lover myself. Nice garden. I really love a lush xeriscape. Helictotrichon sempervirens is a great grass. It grows well for me in hard clay that gets baking dry in the summer and no supplemental irrigation.

    1. PerenniallyCrazy 02/12/2018

      A lucky find and one of those "Stop the car!" moments. Glad I wasn't driving. Hope hubby is used to my spontaneous demands of garden sightings on our road trip. Sorry to chime in late. I was at the NWFGS with no wifi connection but I think some of you who know me are aware.

  8. Sheila_Schultz 02/08/2018

    What a great garden for the community, I'm guessing it gets a lot of folks strolling along the paths on a summers evening. The edible gardens are quite the gift for the local food bank, a wonderful idea!

    1. PerenniallyCrazy 02/12/2018

      A lucky find and one of those "Stop the car!" moments. Glad I wasn't driving. Hope hubby is used to my spontaneous demands of garden sightings on our road trip. Sorry to chime in late. I was at the NWFGS with no wifi connection but I think some of you who know me are aware.

  9. User avater
    Linda on Whidbey 02/08/2018

    Nice find, Cherry. Although I’ve heard of Revelstoke, I had to map it to see exactly where it is as I know we went through there many years ago. This is a great garden. I love the mass plantings, the interesting sculpture and the fact that it is nourishing the community.

    1. PerenniallyCrazy 02/12/2018

      It was a lucky find! You know one of those "Stop the car!" moments.

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