Genus: Amsonia

Amsonia

Photo/Illustration: 
Michelle Gervais
(Amsonia)
am-SO-nee-ah
Synonyms:  Rhazya
Apocynaceae
Useful in a border, at a woodland edge, or in a wildflower garden, the genus Amsonia is made up of about 20 species of clump-forming perennials that bear long-lasting, narrowly funnel-shaped blue flowers that resemble small stars. They bloom from spring to summer. The leaves of some species turn vibrant yellow in the fall, adding another season of interest. The foliage is attractive throughout the growing season, regardless of fall color. Amsonia are native to woodland and grassland in southeastern Europe, Turkey, Japan, and the northeastern and central U.S.
Noteworthy characteristics:  Good fall color in some species. Long-lasting blue flowers. Some are U.S. natives. Skin may be irritated by the milky sap.
Care:  Amsonia tolerate any moist but well-drained soil in full sun to light shade. They are somewhat drought-tolerant.
Propagation: 

Divide in spring. Root softwood or basal cuttings in early summer. Sow seed in a cold frame in spring or autumn using containers.

Problems: 

Susceptible to rust.

Species, varieties and clutivars for genus Amsonia

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Arkansas blue star
Amsonia hubrichtii
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Dwarf blue star
Amsonia montana 'Short Stack’
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Willow blue-star
Amsonia tabernaemontana