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Browse Plants

Narrowed By:Characteristics: Self Seeds+ Flower Color: White, Yellow+ Botanical Name: P - R
Displaying 1 - 12 of 12 listings   Sort By: Sort
Papaver nudicaule Papaver nudicaule
(Iceland poppy)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Iceland poppy is a short-lived perennial usually grown as a cool-weather annual, or biennial. From hairy tufts of linear blue-green foliage rise wiry stems bearing a pendant bud. The single (occasionally double) short-lived flowers unwrinkle their petals into a wide-spreading saucer shape 3 inches across.

Phlox paniculata Phlox paniculata
(Garden phlox, Perennial phlox)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This sturdy, upright perennial reaches 2 to 4 feet tall. In July and August, and through September with deadheading, it bears flowers in shades of white, coral, pink, red, lavender, and violet, depending on the cultivar. Some have a lighter or darker eye, and others have variegated leaves. Many of the cultivars are fragrant; scent is most noticeable at night.

Polemonium caeruleum Polemonium caeruleum
(Jacob’s ladder, Greek valerian)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This North American native bears deep blue or occasionally white, bell-shaped blossoms in spring and possibly late summer if deadheaded. It grows from 1 to 3 feet tall. Use Jacob's ladder in a lightly shaded border, rock garden, woodland, or cottage garden.

Psoralea pinnata Psoralea pinnata
(African scurf pea, Blue pea)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This short-lived shrub or small tree with feathery foliage is blanketed in late spring with fragrant, pea-shaped violet blooms with white wings. Though it is native to streamsides, scurf pea doesn't require extravagant watering and survives occasional drought. When the plants eventually die, they leave ample progeny and straight branches useful for garden stakes. Combine with azaleas and camellias, which bloom at the same time.

Pulsatilla vulgaris Pulsatilla vulgaris
(Pasque flower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Pasque flower blooms for 4 to 6 weeks in spring with fuzzy flower buds that open to 1.5-inch-wide purple flowers that dance in the breeze. Fuzzy, feathery seedheads take up the dance when the blooms end. By then, the felted leaves have pushed up to produce a lacy gray-green backdrop.

no image available Ribes odoratum
(Buffalo currant, Clove currant, Golden currant)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In spring, this North American native shrub produces clove-scented, lemon-yellow flowers, which are followed by black edible fruits. It has attractive leaves, and grows 6 feet high and wide.

no image available Ribes sanguineum 'White Icicle'
(Red flowering currant, Winter currant)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is considered one of the best white flowering currants, bearing long-lasting, pendent racemes of pungently spicy, pure-white blooms. Its yellow autumn leaves fall to expose mahogany stems in winter, which later make a striking contrast to chartreuse flower buds in spring. It grows to about 10 feet high and wide.

Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii 'Goldsturm' Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii 'Goldsturm'
(Orange Coneflower, Black-eyed Susan)
(12 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Large flowers consisting of brassy orange-yellow rays surrounding brown cones are what make this plant so popular. It blooms for 7 or 8 weeks beginning in midsummer. The flowers top 18- to 30-inch-tall plants that will readily self sow in cultivated soils. 

Rudbeckia hirta Rudbeckia hirta
(Black-eyed Susan, Gloriosa daisy, Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This biennial or short-lived perennial has given rise to numerous cultivars which are often grown as annuals. From summer into early autumn, it bears daisy-like blossoms (to 3 inches across) with light or deep yellow rays and brownish-purple centers. The flowers are a staple in late summer bouquets.

Rudbeckia maxima Rudbeckia maxima
(Giant coneflower, Black-eyed Susan)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This choice species makes a strong vertical statement with its large, smooth, sea-green leaves and towering stems to 6 feet tall. It bears short, yellow ray florets with giant, upright cones at the center. It prefers average soil with good drainage, and is excellent in native or wild plantings.

Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eilers' Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eilers'
('Henry Eilers' sweet coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The unique, finely quilled, 2-inch-wide flowers are what make 'Henry Eilers' stand out from the rest of the coneflowers. The petals sit separate from one another, forming a brilliant, golden yellow starburst around a dark brownish purple cone. The blooms grow on strong, upright, 4- to 5-foot-tall stems in late summer, and are produced in such abundance that you can cut some for bouquets and you'll never even notice they are missing from the garden. The stems are covered with a soft, hairy down, while the leaves have a pleasing vanilla-and-anise scent.

no image available Rudbeckia triloba
(Brown-eyed Susan, Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This biennial makes a superb, self-sown companion in a mixed border or wild garden. It reaches up to 5 feet tall and exhibits a long-lasting, airy spray of small, daisy-like blossoms in yellow with purple-black centers. The flowers are beautiful in late summer bouquets. 


Displaying 1 - 12 of 12 listings   Sort By: Sort