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Browse Plants

Narrowed By:Characteristics: Attracts Butterflies+ Flower Color: Yellow+ Height: 3 - 6 ft., Over 30 ft.
Displaying 1 - 20 of 20 listings   Sort By: Sort
Aster dumosus Aster dumosus
(New York aster, Michaelmas daisy)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a short-growing aster with lilac-blue flowers and creeping rootstocks. Many cultivars exist. It can be used on steep slopes for erosion control.

Aster novae-angliae Aster novae-angliae
(New England aster)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Strong, almost woody, stems bear large sprays (to 10 inches) of violet-purple flowers.

Bidens aristosa Bidens aristosa
(Tickseed sunflower, Long-bracted beggar-ticks)
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This fast-growing annual of the Midwestern wet meadows grows to 4 or 5 feet tall. Hundreds of 2-inch golden daisies with buttery tips and dark, fringed eyes smother fine foliage in late summer. Be cautioned, this plant generously self-sows, and is on Kentucky's invasive plant list.

Dahlia 'Kaiser Wilhelm' Dahlia 'Kaiser Wilhelm'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Of the maybe 10,000 named dahlias introduced in the 1800s—when dahlias ranked right up there with roses in popularity—only three survive. One of them is 'Kaiser Wilhelm', introduced in 1892. Its 3-inch flowers have neatly curled petals of soft custard-yellow brushed with burgundy, and a green button eye just like that of an old rose. The plant can grow to 5 feet.

Dahlia 'Kidd's Climax' Dahlia 'Kidd's Climax'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The pink-and-cream dinner-plate-sized 'Kidd's Climax' of 1947 has 10-inch flowers atop 4-foot-tall plants.

Diervilla sessilifolia 'Butterfly' Diervilla sessilifolia 'Butterfly'
(Southern bush honeysuckle)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Southern bush honeysuckle has an attractive thicket-forming habit. Glossy green leaves with tapered tips emerge tinged with bronze and mature to mid-green on reddish stems. Sulfur-yellow flowers in terminal clusters to 3 inches across appear in summer.

Helianthus angustifolius Helianthus angustifolius
(Swamp sunflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A profusion of golden yellow flowers appears for two to three weeks starting in early autumn. Daisy-like flowerheads are 3 inches across with 15 to 20 yellow ray florets radiating from a flat-topped purple or dark brown cone. The entire plant looks like a giant flame, drawing the attention of gardeners and many species of butterflies, bees, and other nectar feeders.

Hemerocallis 'Autumn Minaret' Hemerocallis 'Autumn Minaret'
(Daylily)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Daylilies are classic, extremely popular garden plants. They feature long, arching, strappy leaves and long stems of generally 6-petaled flowers, though double flowers are popular as well. Each flower lasts only one day, hence the plant’s common name. Daylilies come in a wide range of colors, from cream and cheery yellow to peach, orange, fiery red, deep burgundy, pink, and purple. Some have contrasting throats and "eye-zones." Daylilies are ideal for a mixed herbaceous perennial border.

no image available Ribes odoratum
(Buffalo currant, Clove currant, Golden currant)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In spring, this North American native shrub produces clove-scented, lemon-yellow flowers, which are followed by black edible fruits. It has attractive leaves, and grows 6 feet high and wide.

Rosa 'Graham Thomas' Rosa 'Graham Thomas'
(English shrub rose)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This notable rose has quartered-rosette, double blossoms of rich yellow. It produces arching stems to 5 feet or more, making it an ideal candidate for training up a low structure.

no image available Rosa 'Little Darling'
(Floribunda rose)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This fragrant rose produces single salmon-pink blossoms with yellow basal highlights. It blooms nonstop from June until frost and grows 3 to 5 feet high and wide.

Rudbeckia maxima Rudbeckia maxima
(Giant coneflower, Black-eyed Susan)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This choice species makes a strong vertical statement with its large, smooth, sea-green leaves and towering stems to 6 feet tall. It bears short, yellow ray florets with giant, upright cones at the center. It prefers average soil with good drainage, and is excellent in native or wild plantings.

Rudbeckia subtomentosa Rudbeckia subtomentosa
(Sweet coneflower)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This dignified U.S. native species has downy leaves and bears clusters of luminous clear-yellow flowers with reddish-brown center cones. It blooms for over a month starting in mid- to late-summer.

Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eilers' Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eilers'
('Henry Eilers' sweet coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The unique, finely quilled, 2-inch-wide flowers are what make 'Henry Eilers' stand out from the rest of the coneflowers. The petals sit separate from one another, forming a brilliant, golden yellow starburst around a dark brownish purple cone. The blooms grow on strong, upright, 4- to 5-foot-tall stems in late summer, and are produced in such abundance that you can cut some for bouquets and you'll never even notice they are missing from the garden. The stems are covered with a soft, hairy down, while the leaves have a pleasing vanilla-and-anise scent.

no image available Rudbeckia triloba
(Brown-eyed Susan, Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This biennial makes a superb, self-sown companion in a mixed border or wild garden. It reaches up to 5 feet tall and exhibits a long-lasting, airy spray of small, daisy-like blossoms in yellow with purple-black centers. The flowers are beautiful in late summer bouquets. 

Salvia mexicana 'Limelight' Salvia mexicana 'Limelight'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This unusual tender perennial displays an electric color combination when its vibrant purple-blue flowers open from bright chartreuse calyces.  Fortunately, glossy, bright green leaves hold their own until the show gets started in August (and continues until frost). It forms a tall bush, 6 feet tall by 6 feet wide, which is great for the back of the border. Salvias are some of the showiest plants for containers, annual borders, and mixed borders. Butterflies and hummingbirds love them. 

Solidago rigida Solidago rigida
(Goldenrod, Stiff goldenrod)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This lovely goldenrod has velvety leaves that are gray-green in summer and dusky rose in autumn. It has broad, flattened clusters of rich yellow flowers, which create a striking display on stems 2 to 5 feet tall.

no image available Solidago rugosa
(Goldenrod, Rough-stemmed goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species has open, tree-shaped flower clusters that radiate out like a fountain. It has given rise to S. rugosa 'Fireworks'.  It can grow to 7 feet tall and blooms in mid- to late autumn.  

Solidago rugosa 'Fireworks' Solidago rugosa 'Fireworks'
(Goldenrod, Rough-stemmed goldenrod)
(30 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This eye-catching cultivar has flower clusters that radiate out in all directions and resemble streaming yellow fireworks. Its form is truly unique and enchanting. It reliably provides end-of-season color in blazing shades of yellow. It grows to 5 feet tall and provides good structure in the garden all year.

Tilia americana Tilia americana
(American linden, Basswood)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This deciduous tree with dense foliage and a stately habit produces hanging clusters of fragrant yellow flowers in mid-summer. It grows in a broadly columnar shape and has dark green leaves that are glossy underneath. Basswood makes a good specimen or street tree, although it doesn't tolerate pollution. It can grow as tall as 80 feet with a width of 50 feet. It attracts bees; basswood honey is a sought-after gourmet food.


Displaying 1 - 20 of 20 listings   Sort By: Sort