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Browse Plants

Narrowed By:Type: Trees+ Zone: 9+ Characteristics: Attracts Butterflies
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5 listings   Sort By: Sort
Albizia julibrissin Albizia julibrissin
(Mimosa, Silk tree)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A large shrub or small tree, Albizia julibrissin is native to Iran to Japan. It is a fast-growing plant whose seedlings can become invasive. It can be seen growing in the wild in the southeastern U.S. and California in waste places, fields, and along roads.

However, its bipinnate, ferny leaves and fluffy pink flowerheads that cover the tree in summer make it a garden-worthy plant, as do the fragrance emitted by the flowers, which attract bees. Seed pods that resemble flat beans follow the flowers and persist into winter. Still, care should be used so that seeds from garden plants can't escape into the wild.

Hamelia patens Hamelia patens
(Mexican fire bush, Scarlet bush, Firecracker shrub)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A tropical tree by design, the Mexican fire bush freezes to the ground in winter in Zones 8-11, but grows up to 5 feet tall by summer's end. The erect, branched, woody stems bear simple copper-toned leaves with small orange flowers bunched along the tips. It loves the heat, and the more you can give it, the more vigorous it will be.

Viburnum prunifolium Viburnum prunifolium
(Blackhaw Viburnum)
Be the first to rate this plant
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Blackhaw Viburnum is a large shrub or small tree with clusters of creamy white flowers followed by pink-rose berries, which birds love to eat. Its distinctive bronze-green foliage on reddish purple stems turns blue-black in the fall. Blackhaw grows to 12 to 15 feet high and 8 to12 feet wide.

no image available Vitex agnus-castus
(Chaste tree, Monk's pepper)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This small tree boasts an upright, spreading form and finely dissected gray-green foliage. Its spiky lilac-blue flowers appear from June through September; bloom can be prolonged by deadheading. Chaste tree can grow to 20 feet in southern climates, but in colder areas only 8 to 10 feet.

Vitex agnus-castus var. latifolia Vitex agnus-castus var. latifolia
(Chaste tree)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Chaste tree is a southern favorite beginning to gain favor across the country. Whether left to grow as a large, multistemmed shrub or cut back annually for a more compact look, this selection is a winner. Fine, lacy leaves are glossy and green. Bright blue flower panicles begin to form in early summer and continue through the heat of the season and into fall. This is a reasonably cold-hardy, deer-resistant woody plant, and while V. agnus-castus is typically considered a Zone 7 plant, the variety latifolia can be grown in Zone 6 and even in southern areas of Zone 5.


Displaying 1 - 5 of 5 listings   Sort By: Sort