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Narrowed By:Characteristics: Showy
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Abelia × grandiflora Abelia × grandiflora
(Glossy abelia)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a rounded, semi-evergreen shrub to 10 feet tall and 12 feet wide with glossy, dark green leaves. From midsummer to autumn, it produces fragrant, funnel-shaped white flowers that are tinged with pink.

Abelia × grandiflora 'Confetti' Abelia × grandiflora 'Confetti'
(Variegated glossy abelia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Confetti' offers finely textured medium green foliage variegated with creamy white and pink. Pale pink tubular flowers appear in late summer or fall. This rounded, semi-evergreen shrub grows to about 3 feet tall and 4 feet wide.

Abeliophyllum distichum Abeliophyllum distichum
(White forsythia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This deciduous shrub is related to the forsythia, but differs in that it has white (rather than yellow) flowers that open in early spring before true forsythia. It is a member of the olive family (Oleaceae). In early spring, before the new leaves form, purplish buds all along the grey naked branches open into small white four-petaled, almond-scented flowers with yellow stamens. After flowering, green, glossy abelia-like leaves appear.

Abelmoschus manihot Abelmoschus manihot
(Hibiscus manihot)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A large ornamental okra with dinner-plate-sized, sulfur yellow flowers with dark eyes. Each flower lasts only a day—unfolding slowly in the morning and closing gradually in the evening—but the abundance of flowers open on any one day conceals their short life span.

Acaena inermis 'Purpurea' Acaena inermis 'Purpurea'
(Purple sheep's burr, Purple goose leaf)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This New Zealand native subshrub has 3-inch-wide scalloped leaves and little purple-brown to pale olive leaflets. Its rhizomatous roots spread in a mat to support this plant's wonderful ground-cover form. In early summer, 3/4-inch-wide flowers appear on short stems, and brownish green sepals and white anthers contrast with the dark leaves. The rhizomatous roots of this plant spread slowly into a mat, forming a nice ground cover. Prune every five years or so for a neat appearance; little other care is required. -Gerald Gibbens, Regional Picks: Northwest, Fine Gardening issue #120

no image available Acalypha wilkesiana
(Copperleaf, Jacob's coat)
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This spreading shrub is grown for its multi-colored, toothed, oval leaves. Use it as a houseplant or as an annual or container plant outdoors where it is not hardy. Flowers are small, green or pinkish, and generally not noteworthy. 

Acalypha wilkesiana ‘Tricolor’ Acalypha wilkesiana ‘Tricolor’
(Copperleaf, Firedragon, Jacob's coat, Match-me-if-you-can)
(1 user review)

This spreading shrub from tropical and subtropical regions can reach 6 feet tall. It is grown as a houseplant or as an annual outdoors where it's not hardy. Its oval leaves are splashed with red, green, and yellow and its long, fuzzy flowers are borne periodically throughout the year, although they are somewhat hidden. Acalypha wilkesiana 'Tricolor' can be grown in a warm greenhouse, in a border, or as a specimen or hedging plant (especially in warm areas).

Acanthus mollis Acanthus mollis
(Bear's breeches)
(5 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Acanthus mollis is prized for its bold clumps of shiny green leaves topped with striking, 3-foot-tall spires of white flowers which are clasped by showy purple bracts. This is a great plant for an eye-catching structural element in a part-shade border.

Acanthus mollis 'Tasmanian Angel' Acanthus mollis 'Tasmanian Angel'
(Bear's breeches)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

With their white margins and mottling, the jagged leaves of 'Tasmanian Angel' are a real showshopper, and in late summer, 3-foot-tall, pink-and-cream flower stalks heighten the effect. The variegation may be less pronounced as the leaves age, but the plant still draws the eye. Use it as a multiseason container specimen or as a bedding plant. -Allan Armitage, Plants to know and grow, Fine Gardening issue #119

Acer japonicum 'Aconitifolium' Acer japonicum 'Aconitifolium'
(Full-moon maple, Fernleaf full-moon maple)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Full-moon maple has deeply lobed leaves, crimson autumn color, and plenty of small, reddish flowers in spring. It can be grown as a small tree or multi-stemmed shrub. Its growth habit is mounded, bushy, and spreading. The cultivar name 'Aconitifolium' refers to the fact that its ferny foliage resembles that of monkshood (Aconitum). This beautiful tree makes a great specimen plant and is very hardy.

Acer palmatum 'Amber Ghost' Acer palmatum 'Amber Ghost'
('Amber Ghost' Japanese maple)
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'Amber Ghost' offers unique color in the maples. In spring, it is first bright pink, changing to a melon, pink-orange color. In summer it is a warm soft amber with a distinct green vein. Fall brings bright red and orange. 'Amber Ghost' is a wide, upright tree, excellent for either container or landscape if you want a series of stunning colors to bring into the garden.

Acer palmatum 'Oshu Shidare' Acer palmatum 'Oshu Shidare'
('Oshu Shidare' Japanese maple) Be the first to rate this plant
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This Japanese maple has long-lobed, deeply divided leaves that are cherry red in the spring, a perfect contrast to the pea green bark. In summer the foliage changes slowly from red to green and back to red in fall. The habit is wide spreading with pendulous branches providing movement in the least of wind. Though slow to mature, it is an easy tree to grow and a striking beauty.

Acer palmatum 'Wolff' Acer palmatum 'Wolff'
(Emperor I® Japanese maple)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

I’ll never forget when, in the mid-1990s, I called up a renowned nurseryman in Pennsylvania with questions about a holly, and he shifted the conversation to a new Japanese maple he had bred. “Emperor I®—better than ‘Bloodgood’,” he said. But we have all heard comments like that before. Plant breeders tend to borrow glory from classic plants by claiming their new version is better, but my skepticism about Emperor I® was quashed a year later when I acquired my first small tree. It’s a fast grower—unlike ‘Bloodgood’, which can take years to become a sizable tree. Also, unlike ‘Bloodgood’, Emperor I® holds its spectacular burgundy color all summer in full sun, and when fall rolls in, it evolves to a brilliant fiery red.

Acer palmatum 'Olson’s Frosted Strawberry' Acer palmatum 'Olson’s Frosted Strawberry'
('Olson’s Frosted Strawberry' Japanese maple)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The foliage is bright strawberry red at first emergence, and slowly pink suffuses each leaf along the vein as the spring progresses. Graceful deeply divided leaves with serrated edges gently curve at the tips. In its mature form, this tree will most likely have wide spreading with cascading branches (Because this is a new cultivar and Japanese maples can be very slow growing, accurate information about this tree’s maturity can be difficult to come by) . This cultivar is a seedling from ‘Aka shigitatsu sawa’.

Acer palmatum var. dissectum Acer palmatum var. dissectum
(Japanese maple, Threadleaf Japanese maple)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This round, mound-forming, deciduous Japanese maple has many qualities that make it an excellent garden plant, including a sculptural form, deeply cut foliage, arching shoots, and golden autumn color. The reddish purple flowers are tiny but attractive up close. They are followed by winged fruit. Threadleaf Japanese maple makes a beautiful specimen in small gardens and can be grown in large containers or used for bonsai.

Acer rubrum Acer rubrum
(Red maple, Scarlet maple, Swamp maple)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This tree has lobed leaves that are green on top and gray-white beneath. It turns bright red in autumn. Its form can be round to open-headed.

Acer rubrum ‘Red Sunset’ Acer rubrum ‘Red Sunset’
(Red maple, Scarlet maple)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a rounded to open-crown deciduous tree up to 70 feet tall and 30 feet wide with early, brilliant red fall coloring.

Acer saccharum 'Caddo' Acer saccharum 'Caddo'
('Caddo' Florida maple, 'Caddo' southern sugar maple)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The 'Caddo' maple typically reaches a mature height of 30 feet and spread of 25 feet, but may be taller. Its star-shaped leaves turn under slightly at the edges, and turn muted yellow to orange in the fall that can be spectacular. Its crown is oval-shaped, with an upright/erect growth habit. This moderately drought-tolerant maple is a great street or shade tree.

'Caddo' maples, native to southwestern Oklahoma, are well-adapted to heat and drought, and resistant to leaf tatter and scortch common among many maples. The leaves are dark green, leathery, and deeply lobed.

Acer shirasawanum 'Aureum' Acer shirasawanum 'Aureum'
(Golden Full Moon Maple)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

If your shade garden needs a focal point, consider this small, rounded Japanese maple, with its lime-to-chartreuse-tinged golden leaves. In fall, its leaves turn orange and red, just like those of a sugar maple. This variety, like other small Japanese maples, needs shade and protection from sun and drying winds to keep the foliage from curling and turning brown at the edges. -Michael Ruggiero, Regional Picks: Mid-Atlantic, Fine Gardening issue #127

Acer shirasawanum 'Jordan' Acer shirasawanum 'Jordan'
('Jordan' full moon maple )
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Leaves emerge a lovely pastel orange, changing to stunning bright yellow through the summer with red seeds that push up above the leaves. Introduced by Fratelli Ghiradelli and named after his son, this tree provides a big splash of color and thrives with full sun. It's a vigorous upright tree. At last a yellow tree for the colder climates!

Acer shirasawanum 'Munn 001' Acer shirasawanum 'Munn 001'
(Moonrise™ full moon maple)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This tree offers many reasons to get excited:bright red spring foliage, wonderful chartreuse summer color, a vigorous growth habit, and an increased sun tolerance.  It has a big, beautiful open form, similar to Aureum.

Acer triflorum Acer triflorum
(Three-flower maple)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This broadly columnar to spreading tree has peeling brown bark, three-palmate mid-green leaves, and brilliant orange-red fall foliage. It grows up to 30 feet tall and 25 feet wide.

no image available Acer truncatum
(Shantung maple, Purpleblow maple)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Compact and rounded, the Shantung maple reaches a mature height and spread of 25 feet by 30 feet. The leaves grow to 5 inches long and have five to seven lobes, resembling the leaves of the Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua). Leaves emerge purple in spring and become glossy and medium green during the growing season. In autumn, the starry leaves blaze into shades of yellow and orange, accented by reds and purples. Samara (fruit) are red.

Achillea ‘Coronation Gold’ Achillea ‘Coronation Gold’
(Yarrow)
(5 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This 2.5- to 3-feet-tall and 1.5-foot wide plant produces dense, flat clusters of golden yellow flowers above fern-like, silvery foliage starting in early summer.

Achillea millefolium Achillea millefolium
(Yarrow)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This rhizomic, mat-forming and aggressive perennial grows to 2 feet tall and wide with ferny, finely-textured, green foliage. Flowers are produced in flat corymbs in early to late summer.

Achillea millefolium 'Apricot Delight' Achillea millefolium 'Apricot Delight'
('Apricot Delight' yarrow)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Apricot Delight' has deep reddish apricot blooms that then mature to a pale salmon, and they harmonize well with other colors. 'Apricot Delight' has a long blooming season (from early to late summer, with deadheading). This cultivar is smaller than most yarrows, and the blooms make nice cut flowers. -Allan Armitage, Plants to know and grow, Fine Gardening issue #121

Achillea 'Moonshine' Achillea 'Moonshine'
(Yarrow)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This popular gray-leaved yarrow has 18-inch-tall yellow flower heads that last for several weeks in late summer.

Achillea millefolium 'Terracotta' Achillea millefolium 'Terracotta'
(Yarrow)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Flat-topped corymbs of small, daisy-like flowers in colors of salmon-peach to yellow-orange are borne simultaneously on one plant up to 2 feet tall and wide. Flowers are complemented by silvery-green, finely-textured foliage.

no image available Achillea millefolium ‘Fire King’
(Yarrow)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This rhizomatous, mat-forming, upright, aggressive perennial produces strong red flowers in flat corymbs in summer atop finely-textured, aromatic foliage.

no image available Acidanthera bicolor var. murielae
(Abyssinian gladiolus, Sword lily)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Each flowering stem of this bulb produces eight to twelve flowers that open consecutively over a period of three to four weeks. The flowers are fragrant, white, and starry, and have a conspicuous red/maroon center. Its linear, sword-shaped, 2- to 3-foot-tall leaves resemble those of Gladiolus, but are more slender and graceful.

Acorus calamus ‘Variegatus’ Acorus calamus ‘Variegatus’
(Variegated sweet flag)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Variegated sweet flag is a deciduous, aquatic perennial with 5-foot-long bright green leaves with creamy, longitudinal stripes. Its flowers are insignificant, but its leaves are aromatic and resemble the foliage of an iris. Sweet flag makes a striking statement at the shallow end of a pool, in a bog garden, or in a marshy woodland area.

Acorus gramineus 'Ogon' Acorus gramineus 'Ogon'
(Golden dwarf sweet flag, Japanese rush, Grassy-leaved sweet flag)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This dwarf cultivar of grassy-leaved sweet flag (to 10 inches tall and 6 inches wide) has linear fans of semi-evergreen, glossy, pale green and cream-striped leaves that have an overall golden effect. This is an aquatic perennial with showy foliage for shallow water margins.

Acorus gramineus 'Variegatus' Acorus gramineus 'Variegatus'
(Grassy-leaved sweet flag, Variegated Japanese rush)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This aquatic perennial is semi-evergreen and showy, with grassy, striped foliage that reaches less than 1 foot tall. The species is native to East Asia. Use it in a situation where its diminutive size can be appreciated along the margins of a pool or in a bog garden.

Actaea pachypoda Actaea pachypoda
(White baneberry, White cohosh)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This 3-foot-tall and 2-foot-wide clumping perennial displays spiky racemes of white flowers in late spring and early summer followed by bright white berries with dark tips on bright red stalks. The berries are exceptionally showy and especially effective in shady woodland beds.

Actaea racemosa Actaea racemosa
(Black cohosh, Black snakeroot, Bugbane)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Actaea racemosa is a native woodland perennial with white, somewhat fuzzy flowers in midsummer that wave above astilbe-like, deeply cut foliage. The flowers can be unpleasantly scented, thus the name "bugbane." Formerly in the genus Cimicifuga, this plant is great for use in a woodland garden or moist border.

Actaea rubra Actaea rubra
(Red baneberry, Snakeberry)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Actaea rubra bears white flowers from spring to early summer on plants up to 2 feet tall and 1 foot wide. In late summer, glossy red berries develop. A few cultivars exist. This woodland perennial is native to the U.S.

Actaea simplex Actaea simplex
(Autumn bugbane, Autumn snakeroot)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This clumping woodland perennial with deep green foliage up to 4 feet tall and 2 feet wide bears spikes of  fragrant white flowers 1 to 2 feet long in fall. Cultivars exist with varying leaf colors and forms.

Actaea simplex 'Brunette' Actaea simplex 'Brunette'
(Baneberry, Snakeroot)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This chocolate-leaved cultivar up to 4 feet tall and 2 feet wide bears compact spikes of white flowers in late summer. This plant may languish in very warm temperatures. The flowers remain ornamental for three to four weeks.

Actaea simplex ‘Hillside Black Beauty’ Actaea simplex ‘Hillside Black Beauty’
(Bugbane, Autumn snakeroot, black cohosh)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Unlike other bugbanes, 'Hillside Black Beauty' offers deep purple-black foliage. From late spring to late summer, its dark hue makes a wonderful backdrop for colorful foliage and flowering shade plants. In fall, fragrant, cream-colored flowers appear on tall, wandlike stems. An added plus: this plant is deer resistant. --Michael Ruggiero, Regional Picks: Mid-Atlantic, Fine Gardening issue #127

Actinidia kolomikta Actinidia kolomikta
(Variegated kiwi vine)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Variegated kiwi vine is an attractive woody vine that tolerates shade. The male has lovely pink, white, and green variegated leaves and small flowers that are fragrant and cream-covered. This species needs both a male and female plant to produce its sweet, grape-sized fruit. The fruits have no fuzz, and the skin is soft and tender. Best fruit production is achieved in full sun. The cultivar 'Arctic Beauty' has smaller leaves but is hardy to Zone 3.

Adiantum capillus-veneris Adiantum capillus-veneris
(Southern maidenhair fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The southern maidenhair fern has fluffy, airy, and elegant foliage, which works equally well in containers or in open ground. It's a perfect plant for providing light, airy texture to shady beds. -Tom Nelson, Regional Picks: Northern California, Fine Gardening issue #127

Adiantum pedatum Adiantum pedatum
(Northern maidenhair fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Northern maidenhair fern's curved fronds have wiry black stems that wave in the wind. This plant spreads slowly (by branching rhizomes) and eventually forms large colonies. Its delicate texture looks most beautiful when paired with broad-leaved plants. -June Hutson, Regional Picks: Midwest, Fine Gardening issue# 127

Adiantum pedatum ssp. aleuticum Adiantum pedatum ssp. aleuticum
(Northern maidenhair fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is an elegant, deciduous fern with medium green fronds on dark brown or black stalks with thick creeping rhizomes. It provides a distinct form in a woodland setting or shaded border.

Adiantum venustum Adiantum venustum
(Himalayan maidenhair fern)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Elegant, lacy foliage on black stems makes this maidenhair fern a standout, even among others in the genus. In addition, when new fronds emerge in late winter or early spring, they are bright bronze-pink. Only about a foot high, Himalayan maidenhair ferns can spread by creeping rhizomes to form a sizeable colony. They also make eye-catching indoor plants and pair well with orchids.

Adina rubella Adina rubella
(Chinese buttonbush, glossy adina)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This 6- to 8-foot-tall, deciduous shrub is grown for its glossy leaves and spiky, round, creamy-white flowers that appear in early to midsummer.The flowers give way to small brown fruit clusters several weeks later. Chinese buttonbush is closely related to the North American buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis), but is finer-textured and more compact.

Aeonium arboreum 'Zwartkop' Aeonium arboreum 'Zwartkop'
(Black rose)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The "flowers" of black rose. are actually rosettes of burgundy-black leaves at the ends of stalklike stems. In winter, bright yellow flowers contrast with the dark foliage. 'Zwartkop' is a wonderful backdrop plant that can show off many companion plants to maximum advantage. -Jeff Moore, Regional Picks: Southwest, Fine Gardening issue #120

Aesculus parviflora Aesculus parviflora
(Bottlebrush buckeye)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Large palmate-leaved shrub with showy white 12-inch-tall blooms in summer, followed by smooth-skinned fruit. Leaves emerge bronze and turn yellow in autumn.

Aesculus parviflora var. serotina 'Rogers' Aesculus parviflora var. serotina 'Rogers'
('Rogers' bottlebrush buckeye)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a suckering, deciduous shrub grown for it's white, bottlebrush-like flowers in early summer. The flowers are considerably longer than those of the species at up to 30 inches, and emerge a couple of weeks later. The shrub grows to 10 feet tall and 15 feet wide and prefers full sun to partial shade and moist, well-drained soil. Its layers of broad leaves turn gold in fall.Suitable for a medium to large garden.

no image available Aesculus pavia
(Red buckeye)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This conical shrub to small tree has palmate leaves and bears red (sometimes yellow-marked) flowers in 6-inch panicles in summer, followed by smooth-skinned fruit. The flowers attract hummingbirds.

Agapanthus praecox orientalis ATIblu Agapanthus praecox orientalis ATIblu

(Blue Storm™ agapanthus)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Compact, easy care and drought tolerant, Blue Storm is one of the Storm™ series of agapanthus that produce more flower stems than any other agapanthus.   In fact, Blue Storm flowers on average 10 weeks per season (up to two to three weeks longer than most other varieties). -Anthony Tesselaar Plants

Agastache 'Desert Sunrise' Agastache 'Desert Sunrise'
(Hummingbird mint)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This hummingbird mint boasts large spikes of reddish-pink tubular flowers with an orange tint over a long season in summer and early fall. The whole plant is aromatic. Grow in a bed, border, rock garden, or xeric garden.

Agastache ‘Summer Breeze’ Agastache ‘Summer Breeze’
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Agastache ‘Summer Breeze’ produces hundreds of 1.5-inch-long translucent, tubular blossoms. The flowers are painted in luscious sunset shades and appear from late spring to frost. In hot weather, peach, champagne, and soft pink are its colors, while in cooler months the flowers darken to pale copper and medium rose. It forms an open, airy, 2- to 3-foot-tall clump, and the upper third of each stem bears a long succession of hummingbird-attracting blooms.

Agastache ‘Tutti Frutti’ Agastache ‘Tutti Frutti’
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is an erect, bushy perennial with scented gray-green leaves. Its raspberry-red flowers grow on loose, foot-long spikes from midsummer to late fall. The flower spikes have a long bloom period and attract hummingbirds, butterflies, and other insects.  

Agastache aurantiaca 'Just Peachy' Agastache aurantiaca 'Just Peachy'
('Just Peachy' hummingbird mint, 'Just Peachy' hyssop)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A cultivar discovered at High Country Gardens in Santa Fe, New Mexico, this aromatic, water-wise perennial grows to 30 inches tall and 18 inches wide and features fine, mint-scented, gray-green leaves and spikes of tubular flowers in shades of  soft pink and peach from summer to early fall. The plant is hugely attractive to hummingbirds, hence its common name. It is resistant to heat and drought, and can be used in both mixed borders and containers.

Agastache aurantiaca 'Shades of Orange' Agastache aurantiaca 'Shades of Orange'
('Shades of Orange' hummingbird mint, 'Shades of Orange' hyssop)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A cultivar discovered at High Country Gardens in Santa Fe, New Mexico, this aromatic, water-wise perennial grows to 30 inches tall and 18 inches wide and features fine, mint-scented, gray-green leaves and spikes of tubular flowers in shade of orange from mid-summer to fall. The plant is hugely attractive to hummingbirds, hence the common name.

Agastache cana Agastache cana
(Texas hummingbird mint, Mosquito plant, Wild hyssop)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a 36-inch-tall hyssop with showy rose-pink flower spikes in late summer and fall and licorice-mint scented foliage. It is native to New Mexico and western Texas and attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Grow in a border, herb garden, rock garden, or butterfly garden. Rubbing the foliage on skin reportedly repels mosquitoes.

Agastache foeniculum Agastache foeniculum
(Anise hyssop)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A classic plant for both herb gardens and borders, anise hyssop is composed of erect branches of mint-and-licorice-scented, medium green leaves ending in fuzzy spikes of small lavender flowers. The plant grows to 3 to 5 feet tall and 1 foot wide and reseeds freely. The flowers are edible and are charming crumbled into salads. The flowers are highly attractive to bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.

Agastache foeniculum 'Golden Jubilee' Agastache foeniculum 'Golden Jubilee'
(Anise hyssop)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Anise hyssop has subtle but eye-catching chartreuse foliage. Its powder-blue, long-lasting flowers contrast nicely with its leaves.

Agastache rugosa Agastache rugosa
(Wrinkled giant hyssop, Korean hyssop, purple giant hyssop)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This 4-foot-tall and 18-ich-wide, bushy perennial, very similar to the more common anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum) has strongly mint-and-licorice-scented leaves and short spikes of lavender-blue flowers from midsummer to early fall. Unlike most agastaches, both of these species can tolerate more moisture and humity, making them highly suited to climates outside the arid west.

Agastache rupestris Agastache rupestris
(Sunset hyssop)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

True to its name, sunset hyssop encapsulates a Western sunset in its flowers: bronze with hints of orange and yellow, and streaks of magenta and pink along the margins. More and more flowers emerge as summer progresses. The plant blooms heavily in August, and continues into autumn.

Agave 'Sharkskin' Agave 'Sharkskin'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Thick, succulent grayish green leaves tipped with spines make this 3-foot-tall and wide agave a striking addition to a xeric bed or desert garden. Although its color is muted, its architectural form can't be overlooked.

Agave americana Agave americana
(American aloe, Century plant)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant has a rosette of broad sword-like, succulent, gray-green leaves. It provides a statuesque presence for sunny dry sites and under glass. It's also a classic plant for urns, thanks to the architectural splendor of its simple form.

Agave parryi Agave parryi
(Mescal)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant has a dense rosette of fleshy blue-gray leaves and produces tall, cream-colored flowers tinged with red or pink in summer.

Ageratum houstonianum Ageratum houstonianum
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

There are many cultivars available of this fast-growing annual. They are best used as bedding, edging, or container plants. Panicles of blue, pink, purple, or white flowerheads arise from oval, downy leaves in midsummer and continue until frost. They have a soft, fuzzy appearance and attract butterflies.

Ageratum houstonianum 'Blue Danube' Ageratum houstonianum 'Blue Danube'
('Blue Danube' ageratum, 'Blue Danube' floss flower)
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This early, compact bloomer grows to only about 6 or 7 inches tall. With its icy blue-purple flowers, it works well when planted tightly along the foreground of a bed. Its color blends easily with most other hues and textures. -Julia Jones, Designing with annueals, Fine Gardening issue #120

no image available Ajania pacifica 'Yellow Splash'
(Pacific chrysanthemum)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This low-mounding perennial has lobed, silver-edged foliage and small yellow flowerheads in autumn.

Ajuga reptans 'Black Scallop' Ajuga reptans 'Black Scallop'
('Black Scallop' bugleweed)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Black foliage and spiky blue flowers (which appear in early summer) make a dramatic contrast. 'Black Scallop' thrives in full sun, which intensifies the black color. In full sun, the plant produces numerous runners, which should be thinned to prevent crown rot. In large plantings, you can run a rotary mower with a bagger attachment over the patch to control crowding and keep the foliage fresh. In mixed container plantings, the spilling habit of the plant makes it a standout choice. -Ron Smith, Regional Picks: Upper Plains, Fine Gardening issue #120

Albizia julibrissin Albizia julibrissin
(Mimosa, Silk tree)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A large shrub or small tree, Albizia julibrissin is native to Iran to Japan. It is a fast-growing plant whose seedlings can become invasive. It can be seen growing in the wild in the southeastern U.S. and California in waste places, fields, and along roads.

However, its bipinnate, ferny leaves and fluffy pink flowerheads that cover the tree in summer make it a garden-worthy plant, as do the fragrance emitted by the flowers, which attract bees. Seed pods that resemble flat beans follow the flowers and persist into winter. Still, care should be used so that seeds from garden plants can't escape into the wild.

Alcea rosea Alcea rosea
(Hollyhock)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This tall, upright perennial has single flowers of various colors that grow along a spike. It blooms in early summer and midsummer.

Alcea rosea annua 'Spring Celebrities Purple' Alcea rosea annua 'Spring Celebrities Purple'
(Dwarf Purple Hollyhock)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This hollyhock is a multi-use plant that can be grown as a cut flower, used in large containers, or planted in the landscape. These big semi- to fully-double blooms reach 3 inches wide. Considered a first-year blooming biennial or short-lived perennial.

Information provided by Santa Rosa Gardens.
 

Alchemilla mollis Alchemilla mollis
(Lady's mantle)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant has lobed, densely hairy, chartreuse foliage that is crimped at the edges. Soft, frothy, yellow-green foliage hovers above the plant from early summer through autumn.

Allium 'Globemaster' Allium 'Globemaster'
(Ornamental onion)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Allium 'Globemaster' is a true showstopper, growing to about 32 inches tall. Very large, majestic purple spheres up to 8 inches across bear numerous star-shaped, deep lilac flowers in May and June.

Allium caeruleum Allium caeruleum
(Blue globe onion)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant produces dense clusters of bright blue flowerheads up to 1 inch wide. Its leaves clasp its stem and die back before flowering.

Allium christophii Allium christophii
(Stars of Persia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This bulbous perennial produces ribbed stems and strap-shaped, gray-green basal leaves that decline as its flowers form. In early summer, it bears umbels that are 10 to 12 inches in diameter, and contain up to 100 star-shaped fuchsia flowers with a metallic sheen.

Allium giganteum Allium giganteum
(Ornamental onion)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In summer, this plant bears large rounded flower heads up to 4 inches across with a multitude of star-shaped lilac-pink flowers.

Allium moly and cvs. Allium moly and cvs.
(Golden garlic, Lily leek)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

For long-lasting bright yellow flowers that sparkle in midsummer, try Allium moly. It is robust, hardy, and an excellent cut flower, naturalizing and increasing happily in the sun in most garden soils. The cultivar 'Jeannine' flowers earlier and produces larger umbels on sturdier stems.

Allium schoenoprasum Allium schoenoprasum
(Chives)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The purple or white pom-pom flowers of chives top aromatic stems in summer. The leaves are edible and have a mild onion flavor; the flowers can be used as garnishes. Plants grow in dense clumps to 2 feet high. Use chives in a cottage, herb, or vegetable garden, or in containers.

Allium schubertii Allium schubertii
(Ornamental onion)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant bears 12- to 18-inch blooms with nearly 100 pink-rose flowers. When the flowers are spent, they are replaced by airy, fluffy seedpods.

Allium sphaerocephalon Allium sphaerocephalon
(Drumstick allium, Round-headed garlic)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The drumstick allium has egg-shaped flowers in summer that start off green, then bloom and develop to pink and then clover red-purple. These plants are attractive in a bed or border, especially peeking up through other plants, such as roses, so that their nondescript foliage is hidden. Their vertical presence and eye-catching flower shape are valuable additions to the garden, and they naturalize freely.

Alocasia 'Calidora' Alocasia 'Calidora'
('Calidora' elephant's ear)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

‘Calidora’ produces big ribbed foliage that looks like it could have fanned Cleopatra once upon a time. Its upright, arrow-shaped leaves sit on larger-than-life petioles, and can grow up to 6 feet long and 3 feet wide. In full sun, you can expect a V-shaped clump, 2 feet wide at its base and 6 feet wide on top. ‘Calidora’ looks great in a pot or looming over a flower bed.

Alocasia 'Portodora' Alocasia 'Portodora'
('Portodora' elephant's ear)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

‘Portodora’ produces big, ribbed, upward-pointing leaves that look like lettuce-edged fans. This plant adds instant drama.

Alocasia 'Stingray' Alocasia 'Stingray'
('Stingray' elephant's ear)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

‘Stingray’ is the elephant’s ear to acquire if you’re after one-of-a-kind foliage. Like all Alocasia, the leaves of ‘Stingray’ point upward and outward, which show off its ribbed, leathery, emerald green surface. The whiptail conclusion of its inward-curving edges earns ‘Stingray’ its name as this shape resembles the marine animal. ‘Stingray’ unfurls new leaves quickly as long as it’s given ample moisture and sun. I’ve been pleasantly surprised to find a new leaf shooting up from a specimen after spending a weekend away from home. If you plant ‘Stingray’, be prepared to field inquiries from every visitor to your garden, regarding what the heck that plant could possibly be. -Adrienne Roethling, Elephant's Ears, Fine Gardening issue #148, page 61

Alocasia micholitziana 'Frydek' Alocasia micholitziana 'Frydek'
(Elephant's ear)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Satiny deep green to black leaves and glowing white veins on 18-inch-long leaves make this elephant's ear great in containers, in a shady border, at the edge of a pond, or as a houseplant. It also has pale stalks with purplish banding. 'Frydek' is very tolerant of a range of soil pH, heat, humidity, and heavy soil. It can even take about a half day of sunlight.

Aloe cameronii Aloe cameronii
(Red aloe)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Aloe is best known as a medicinal plant (Aloe vera, Zones 10-11), but there are many beautiful aloes as well. Most have amazing winter flowers, and some, have interesting foliage color. Red aloe  has color that varies from green to a deep, red wine hue, depending on sun and water. and, over time, will form beautiful red-purple mounds with orange flowers. It is easily propagated from cuttings. -Jeff Moore, Regional Picks: Southwest, Fine Gardening issue #120

Aloe polyphylla Aloe polyphylla
(Spiral aloe)
(4 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The spine-tipped leaves of this aloe grow in a beautiful spiral; mature plants have five rows of leaves growing either clockwise or counterclockwise. It is very hardy, but will rarely flower. A native of Lesotho, Africa, it is extremely endangered due to overcollecting.

Alstroemeria 'Casablanca' Alstroemeria 'Casablanca'
(Peruvian lily)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Casablanca' Peruvian lily is the closest to white that this genus has gotten as of yet. Inside its amaryllis-shaped white flowers, reddish dashes on a yellow wash and a pale pink throat add interest. 'Casablanca' is also taller than most other Alstroemerias. They make great cut flowers and are frequently used by florists; they also add a tropical feel to beds and borders. Roots are very brittle and care should be taken when planting.

Alternanthera dentata 'Purple Knight' Alternanthera dentata 'Purple Knight'
(Calico plant, Joy weed)
(1 user review)

This dark-leaved, tropical foliage plant loves heat, and is useful spreading through a bed, border, or in a container where its deep purple leaves can contrast with brightly colored flowers or foliage. Alternanthera are native to tropical and sub-tropical areas of Central and South America. Their flowers are generally an afterthought. This plant works well for edging, as an annual groundcover, or in a formal knot garden.

Alternanthera ficoidea 'Red Threads' Alternanthera ficoidea 'Red Threads'
(Joseph's coat, Parrot leaf)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A. ficoidea ‘Red Threads’ is a slender-leaved perennial selection that doesn't wander, forming a textured carpet in shades of deep burgundy. A single plant makes a mound about 8 inches tall and 14 inches wide. It blooms on and off all year, but you may never notice. The small, pale flower buttons are held in the leaf axils, where they are nearly indistinguishable from the foliage unless you're paying close attention. Use 'Red Threads' at the base of taller plants in the border to provide vibrant color echoes or contrasts. Grow as a warm-season annual in cooler climates, mass the plants in beds, or use in a formal knot garden as the Victorians did.

Alternanthera ficoidea 'Yellow Form' Alternanthera ficoidea 'Yellow Form'
(Joseph's coat, Parrot leaf)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Yellow Form' Alternanthera is an easy-to-grow, tropical plant with a fast-spreading habit and pointed, chartreuse-yellow leaves. It forms a mat of color from spring's frost-free date to fall's first frost. Like others of this genus, it makes a great edging, bedding, or container plant. In formal landscapes, it can be used in a knot garden. It looks great with dark-leaved plants.

Amaranthus cruentus Amaranthus cruentus
(Prince's feather, Purple amaranth, Red amaranth)
(1 user review)

Amaranthus cruentus makes a striking statement in beds or borders. Growing to 6 feet in height, it bears somewhat fuzzy-looking spires of purplish red flowers in summer, followed by seed heads that can be red, purple, or yellow. It is native to tropical regions of North and South America, and is one of three Amaranthus species cultivated for their grain.

Amaranthus tricolor and cvs. Amaranthus tricolor and cvs.
(Chinese spinach, Tampala, Joseph's coat)
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This hardy annual has vibrant, ornamental red, yellow, and green foliage that lends a tropical effect to the garden. Small flowers, borne from summer to early autumn, are inconspicuous in comparison to the effect of the foliage. Cultivars feature yellow and maroon-shaded leaves, but the species still offers the showiest foliage.

Amelanchier × grandiflora 'Autumn Brilliance' Amelanchier × grandiflora 'Autumn Brilliance'
(Apple serviceberry)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This shrubby tree has leaves that emerge bronze, mature green, and fade to orange and red in autumn. It bears 3-inch-long racemes of white flowers in spring, followed by edible, juicy blue-black fruit.

Amelanchier alnifolia 'Regent' Amelanchier alnifolia 'Regent'
('Regent' serviceberry)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A compact shrub form of serviceberry, 'Regent' produces finely toothed, rounded leaves that are bluish on top and gray-green on the bottom. In fall, they change to vibrant yellow and red. Spring finds the shrub sporting white flowers in upright clusters that give way to fruit in June. Birds as well as humans appreciate the tasty berries, which make great jellies and jams and are more abundant in full sun. This plant is native to the Great Plains and tolerates harsh, dry, or alkaline conditions when mature.

Ampelaster carolinianus Ampelaster carolinianus
(Climbing Carolina aster)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This perennial vine sends out abundant pale purple to lavender flowers beginning in late October. It grows to 4 to 5 feet tall, and frost does not seem to impede the blooms. It can attract bees and butterflies well into November.

To get the best flower display, give climbing aster as much sun as possible. It should also have something to lean on, like a fence, a trellis, or an ornamental shrub. Don't prune it over the winter, no matter how dead it may look. It’s better to wait to tidy up things after the new growth appears in spring.

Amsonia hubrichtii Amsonia hubrichtii
(Arkansas blue star)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Arkansas blue star's delicate, willow-like foliage is topped with pale blue star-shaped flowers in spring. The light green foliage looks good all summer, turns a beautiful golden-yellow in fall, and can stand through most of the winter, adding interest especially when mixed with grasses and other attractive seedheads. It grows to almost 3 feet tall and wide.

Amsonia montana 'Short Stack’ Amsonia montana 'Short Stack’
(Dwarf blue star)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Chalk up another great plant introduction from the folks at Plant Delights Nursery in Raleigh, North Carolina. This dwarf blue star grows to only about half the size of the species, making it well suited for gardens with limited space. It performs best in full to partial sun and is appreciative of moist, well-drained soil. The sky blue flowers appear in early spring above the clean, dark green foliage. Try planting 'Short Stack' in a mess and along bed edges for a winning display.

Anagallis monellii Anagallis monellii
(Blue pimpernel)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In summer, this colorful groundcover makes a 9-inch mound of saucer-shaped, deep blue flowers on long stalks.

Andropogon gerardii 'Pawnee' Andropogon gerardii 'Pawnee'
(Big bluestem, turkeyfoot)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Pawnee' has an upright habit and warm fall colors that persist into winter. This refined offbig bluestem has the bluish purple stems typical of the genus. In late summer, Purplish red flowers appear in groups of three or six, which look like a turkey foot—hence the nickname: "Turkey Foot Grass." The root system that can extend down more than 10 feet. Each year, a third of these roots die, opening up channels for water. -Scott Vogt, Native grasses, Fine Gardening issue #124

Andropogon zizanioides Andropogon zizanioides
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This beautiful ornamental grass has upright, glossy green foliage and interesting, animated leaf tips that resemble party favors. Evergreen to 25°F, these plants gain reddish purple hues in the fall and winter. This plant is extremely adaptable—it thrives in desert and damp conditions, it is used for erosion control, and it works well in containers or as a screen. It looks especially beautiful when backlit by the sun.

Anemone × hybrida 'Alice' Anemone × hybrida 'Alice'
(Japanese anemone)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This beautiful, pale pink, semi-double-flowered anemone reaches 2 to 3 feet high. The Anemone × hybrida plants are commonly referred to as Japanese hybrids. They're the result of a cross between A. hupehensis var. japonica and A. vitifolia, a tender Himalayan species with grapeleaf-like foliage and white flowers.

Anemone × hybrida 'Honorine Jobert' Anemone × hybrida 'Honorine Jobert'
(Japanese anemone)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This tall, woody-based perennial is distinguished by its elegant flowers. This cultivar displays the purity of a single, white, open-faced flower with a delicate center ring of golden yellow stamens. Every moment of floral development from bud to seed brings satisfying interest.

Anemone × hybrida 'Königin Charlotte' Anemone × hybrida 'Königin Charlotte'
(Japanese anemone)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This beautiful, pale pink, semi-double-flowered anemone with notched petals grows to 4 feet tall and blooms from September to October.

Anemone × hybrida 'Kriemhilde' Anemone × hybrida 'Kriemhilde'
(Japanese anemone)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This beautiful, lavender-pink anemone reaches 32 to 40 inches tall. 'Kriemhilde' blooms from September to October.

Anemone × hybrida 'Margarete' Anemone × hybrida 'Margarete'
(Japanese anemone)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This beautiful, medium pink, semi-double-flowered anemone has exceptionally large blooms from mid- to late-September through October on stems 28 to 32 inches tall.

Anemone × hybrida 'Richard Ahrens' Anemone × hybrida 'Richard Ahrens'
(Japanese anemone)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This beautiful, vigorous, pale pink, semi-double-flowering anemone starts blooming in early July into September on 28- to 36-inch stems.

Anemone × hybrida 'Rosenschale' Anemone × hybrida 'Rosenschale'
(Japanese anemone)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This large, single-flowered, pinkish-purple anemone blooms from August to October on stems 24 to 34 inches tall.

Anemone × hybrida 'September Charm' Anemone × hybrida 'September Charm'
(Japanese anemone)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Anemones thrive in light to partial shade but will tolerate full sun, as long as there is sufficient moisture. Site plants in moist, humus-rich soil, but avoid overly wet conditions. Apply mulch annually in northern regions.

Anemone × hybrida 'Whirlwind' Anemone × hybrida 'Whirlwind'
(Japanese anemone)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This beautiful, white, semi-double-flowered anemone reaches 25 to 30 inches tall. An early flowerer, ‘Whirlwind blooms from August to October.

Anemone blanda Anemone blanda
(Grecian windflower)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant produces a great low-growing mat of flowers. The cheerful starlike blossoms come in pink, blue, and white, and the attractive finely cut leaves disappear soon after flowering.

Anemone hupehensis 'Hadspen Abundance' Anemone hupehensis 'Hadspen Abundance'
(Japanese anemone)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant has dark pink, two-toned flowers that occur in abundance and rise above the foliage on branched stems from August to Octover. It is beautiful in the woodland garden or border and planted in masses, although they can overwhelm other plants and become a nuisance in a bed.

Anemone hupehensis var. japonica Anemone hupehensis var. japonica
(Japanese anemone)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Japanese anemones are slightly taller than the species, sometimes growing to 4 feet. The creamy pink flowers with yellow centers rise above the foliage on branched stems from midsummer to autumn. This perennial is beautiful in the woodland garden or border and planted in masses, although they can become weedy in some areas.

Anemone hupehensis var. japonica 'Bressingham Glow' Anemone hupehensis var. japonica 'Bressingham Glow'
(Japanese anemone)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Japanese anemones are slightly taller than the species, sometimes growing to 4 feet. The deep rose-pink semi-double flowers with yellow centers rise above the foliage on branched stems from midsummer to autumn. This perennial is beautiful in the woodland garden or border and planted in masses, although they can become weedy in some areas.

Anemone tomentosa 'Robustissima' Anemone tomentosa 'Robustissima'
(Grape-leaf anemone)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This anemone grows 24 to 32 inches tall with single, light violet-pink flowers. It's an extremely robust and vigorous plant that is best suited to naturalizing. It will overwhelm other plants and may become a nuisance in a bed.

Anemonella thalictroides Anemonella thalictroides
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

These plants are noted for their lovely, 1/2- to 1- inch-diameter crystalline white flowers. Resembling little pinwheels, each flower is composed of 6 to 10 colorful sepals spinning around a nub of lime-green and yellow. Their typical color is pure and bright white, but you might find the tinted soft rose Anemonella thalictroides f. rosea at a specialty nursery.

Anemonella thalictroides 'Rosea' Anemonella thalictroides 'Rosea'
(Rue anemone)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The only member of its genus, rue anemone is a tuberous perennial native to the woodlands of eastern North America. 'Rosea' has pink, fragile, cup-shaped flowers on slender stems from spring to early summer, a long bloom sesaon for a spring wildflower. It often goes dormant in summer. Its flowers resemble a small anemone and its leaves resemble Thalictrum (meadow rue), hence its common name of "rue anemone." Use this delicate, small plant in a shady rock garden, in a woodland or native plant garden, or as underplanting in a shady shrub border

Anethum graveolens Anethum graveolens
(Dill)
(1 user review)

As an herb, A. graveolens is commonly grown for the culinary attributes of its leaves and seeds. Its distinctive foliage texture and flower color and form make this plant a nice companion in a mixed border. It provides a valuable food source for butterfly larvae and attracts beneficial insects also.

Angelica gigas Angelica gigas
(Angelica)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This showstopper produces conspicuous, red-purple leaf sheaths with dense, purple domed flowerheads.

Angelica pachycarpa Angelica pachycarpa
(Angelica)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Angelica is a striking ornamental biennial or short-lived perennial with jade green, glossy, bold leaves and large umbels of white flowers. It makes a unique statement in the garden.

Angelonia angustifolia Angelonia angustifolia
(Angelonia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Upright, low perennial with deep mauve to violet two-lipped flowers blooming all summer. Angelonia are superlative container plants, and can also be grown as bedding annuals.

Antennaria neodioica Antennaria neodioica
(Northern pussy toes, Cat feet, Everlasting, Ladies' tobacco)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This deciduous, mat-forming perennial produces everlasting flowers. It is a native prairie plant that has stem and leaf bottoms covered with white hairs and whitish flower heads that form in dense clusters. Male and female flowers are produced on separate plants.

Anthemis tinctoria Anthemis tinctoria
(Golden marguerite, Oxeye chamomile)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This clump-forming perennial produces many weeks of daisy-like flowers in summer. It is great in borders and works well as a cut flower.

Anthericum saundersiae Anthericum saundersiae
(Grass lily, Weeping anthericum)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant's foot-tall clumps produce white lily-like flowers on thin, arching stems. It blooms from late spring into fall; blooms are followed by attractive brown capsular fruits. Its foliage is narrow, linear, and dark-green.

Anthriscus sylvestris 'Ravenswing' Anthriscus sylvestris 'Ravenswing'
(Ravenswing)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is the bronze-purple form of the common Queen Anne's lace. It produces beautiful, highly fringed, lacy foliage in a dusky purple.

Antirrhinum majus Antirrhinum majus
(Snapdragons)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant produces upright racemes of two-lipped flowers with spreading, rounded lobes in a vast arrray of warm colors. It flowers profusely summer through autumn.

no image available Aquilegia alpina
(Alpine columbine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant bears terminal racemes of two to three nodding blue flowers, sometimes with white tips.

Aquilegia caerulea Aquilegia caerulea
(Rocky Mountain columbine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Rocky Mountain columbine is a beautiful, hearty, native perennial with blue and white flowers. It self-sows readily.

Aquilegia canadensis 'Corbett' Aquilegia canadensis 'Corbett'
(Columbine, Canada columbine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This airy perennial has delicate dark-green leaves and many nodding, light-yellow flowers from mid-spring to midsummer. 

Aquilegia chrysantha Aquilegia chrysantha
(Golden columbine, Yellow columbine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A. chrysantha is a vigorous grower that will add a real burst of color to any southern garden. This southwestern U.S. native has 3-inch yellow flowers in spring and reaches almost 3 feet tall.

no image available Aquilegia flabellata
(Fan columbine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The fan columbine produces short, plump, nodding, blue-purple flowers with white petal tips.

no image available Aquilegia longissima
(Longspur columbine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species of Aquilegia is short lived, but its bright yellow, fragrant flowers with elongated spurs will be a vibrant addition to your garden.

Aquilegia vulgaris Aquilegia vulgaris
(Granny’s bonnet)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Usually this plant produces nodding blue and white flowers, but color variation is common in this species.

no image available Aralia racemosa
(Spikenard)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a vigorous grower. Its beautiful dark fruits, which arrive after the flowers, bring an abundance of birds.

Aralia spinosa Aralia spinosa
(Devil's walking stick, Hercules club, Angelica tree, Prickly ash)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The textural quality of this eastern native's stems and foliage is superb. During winter, a circle of the thorn-covered stems is as magical as an outdoor sculpture. Dark blue-green compound leaves offer a tropical effect before turning yellow and purple in autumn. One-foot-wide flower clusters sit atop the foliage in summer and transform into purple-black fruits that attract birds. Aralia spinosa grows to 30 feet tall and spreads indefinitely.

Arctostaphylos uva-ursi Arctostaphylos uva-ursi
(Common bearberry, Kinnikinnick)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a fine plant for cascading over the edge of a wall. It's a hardy, prostrate shrub with intricate branching that often forms mats up to 3 feet wide, by runners. Fragrant, white bell-shaped flowers tinged with pink are borne in May and followed later in the season by red berries. The common bearberry's stunning red stems are studded with small, glossy, evergreen leaves.

Ardisia crenata Ardisia crenata
(Coralberry, Spiceberry)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This shrub produces abundant, long-lasting, coral-red to scarlet berries, which stand out against dark-green, glossy leaves.

Argyranthemum frutescens Argyranthemum frutescens
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Argyranthemum is often mistaken for or offered as Chrysanthemum. It is a great plant in containers where it isn't hardy. A. 'Jamaica Primrose' and A. 'Vancouver' will survive in Zones 7-11.

Arisaema sikokianum Arisaema sikokianum
(Japanese cobra lily)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The outside of the spathe is the color of dark chocolate, and the inside, milk white and as smooth as marble. Its hood sweeps up to an arrogant point, exposing its sumptuous white lining and the thick blunt spadix, which is also milk white. This plant produces two leaves per tuber, one leaf with three lobes and one with five. Sometimes they are mottled with silver, which makes them very handsome, at least until the plant goes dormant in summer.

Arisaema triphyllum Arisaema triphyllum
(Jack-in-the-pulpit)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A favorite of children, Jack-in-the-pulpit is a tuberous perennial producing one or two leaves, each divided into three narrow leaflets. But it's best known for its spring to early summer display of hooded, green spathes—Jack's pulpit—which are often striped with purple. Autumn brings clusters of densely packed, showy red berries.

Armoracia rusticana 'Variegata' Armoracia rusticana 'Variegata'
(Common horseradish, Red cole)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant's large, undulating leaves are textured like puckered crepe paper. Moreover, they resemble designer textiles with splendid splashes of cream and dark green. This has to be the queen of variegated plants.

Aronia arbutifolia Aronia arbutifolia
(Red chokeberry)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Fragrant white flowers in spring, red fall foliage, and persistent berries for winter interest make Aronia a valuable plant in all seasons.

Aronia melanocarpa Aronia melanocarpa
(Black chokeberry)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Black chokeberry is a medium-size shrub with multiple seasons of interest. Starting with showy clusters of white flowers in early summer, followed by dark purple fruits greatly appreciated by robins, this adaptable shrub closes the growing season with beautiful, wine red fall foliage. Black chokeberry is most effective when massed in the landscape and allowed to follow its natural tendency to spread by suckering.

Artemisia absinthium Artemisia absinthium
(Absinth, Wormwood)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Artemisia absinthium is a woody perennial with finely cut, silvery-gray, aromatic foliage. Its small yellow flowers have little ornamental value. Wormwood is useful in beds, borders, and rock gardens, and it makes an excellent foil for bright colors and dark foliage. This plant needs excellent drainage.

Arum italicum Arum italicum
(Italian arum, Orange candleflower)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A. italicum will add great color and diversity to the garden with their attractively marked leaves, which may be arrow- or spear-shaped. Leaves are veined with mid-green to white. In early summer, white spathes of flowers are followed by spikes of bright orange red berries.

Aruncus dioicus Aruncus dioicus
(Goatsbeard, Goat's beard)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Goat's beard is a perennial native to eastern North America and parts of Europe and Siberia. It is grown for its tall stature (up to 6 feet) and showy, cream-colored plumes of flowers in summer. The effect is that of a giant astilbe. Plants with male flowers produce showier and more erect plumes than plants with female flowers, whose plumes are more pendent and less creamy-white. Grow in a woodland garden or moist border, or at waterside.

Asarina scandens Asarina scandens
(Figwort, Creeping snapdragon)
(2 user reviews)

A half-hardy perennial, this sophisticated climber grows to 8 feet tall. It has a profuse show of 1.5-inch indigo, violet, pink, or white flowers. It's great for the cold greenhouse or conservatory, and will often bloom until the end of the year unless there is a hard frost.

Asarum europaeum Asarum europaeum
(European wild ginger)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

European wild ginger is a low-growing groundcover with glossy, evergreen, heart-shaped leaves. Its unusual purple-brown flowers lie mostly concealed beneath foliage.

Asarum shuttleworthii Asarum shuttleworthii
(Evergreen wild ginger)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This wild ginger is an evergreen groundcover with heart-shaped, shiny leaves that are often marbled. Its interesting brown-purple flowers hide beneath the foliage.

Asarum splendens Asarum splendens
(Chinese wild ginger)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

There are many species and varie­­ties of wild ginger, but this vigorous, fast-growing, and beau­tiful species tops my list. Elongated, heart-shaped, dark green leaves look and feel as if they were made out of Naugahyde and splashed with metallic paint. The foliage shimmers when hit by a beam of light. It is evergreen to 10°F but will quickly reappear in the spring if it freezes. If you want to see the unique, 2-inch-wide, dark purple flowers, get on your hands and knees and look at the base of the plants. Though not particularly showy, they are interestingly attractive.
Plants spread quickly by underground rhizomes, forming a thick mat of foliage that crowds out weeds. I recommend spacing them 10 to 12 inches apart and letting them fill in over the next few years. Plants are not picky about soil pH or type, but they do best in well-drained areas. -Jimmy Turner, Plants for dry shade, Fine Gardening issue #133

Asclepias tuberosa Asclepias tuberosa
(Butterfly weed)
(5 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Butterfly weed is a native perennial with flat-topped, orange or yellow flower clusters at the ends of its stems or in its leaf axils. From midsummer to autumn, it produces clusters of brightly colored flowers that attract insects, followed by fruit and showy seed. Plant in a border, meadow, butterfly garden, or wildflower garden.

Asparagus officinalis Asparagus officinalis
(Asparagus)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Asparagus is a perennial vegetable whose edible shoots are harvested in spring. Male plants produce better crop yields because they do not flower or fruit. The foliage is garden worthy because of its tall size and masses of feathery, delicate texture. Female plants may self-seed abundantly. Plants do not like to be moved, so choose a permanent location. Foliage is useful in floral arrangements.

Aspidistra elatior Aspidistra elatior
(Cast-iron plant)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is an ovate, glossy-leaved plant usually grown as a houseplant. In early summer, it produces fleshy, bell-shaped, cream colored flowers with maroon interiors.

Aster × frikartii 'Wonder of Staffa' Aster × frikartii 'Wonder of Staffa'
('Wonder of Staffa' aster)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This repeat-blooming aster produces bright, 2-inch-wide, violet-blue flowers from mid-summer into fall. It grows to 3 feet tall and 1 to 2 feet wide and prefers full sun and average, well-drained soil.

Aster ericoides Aster ericoides
(Heath aster)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This clumping, bushy perennial has slender stems and small, lance-shaped, medium green leaves. From late summer to late fall, it produces white flowerheads with yellow centers to a half-inch across. Its cultivars may bear flowers tinged pink or blue.

Aster lateriflorus ‘Lady in Black’ Aster lateriflorus ‘Lady in Black’
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Although it’s valued for its autumn blossoms, ‘Lady in Black’ creates a stir from the moment its dusky purple leaves unfurl in spring. By summer’s end, thousands of tiny dark buds dot the densely branched 3-foot-tall plant, promising an explosion of color.

Aster macrophyllus Aster macrophyllus
(Bigleaf aster)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This striking, richly-textured, deciduous ground cover has heart-shaped leaves that turn mauve in autumn. Purple, blue, or white flowers appear in late summer to early fall.

Aster novae-angliae Aster novae-angliae
(New England aster)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Strong, almost woody, stems bear large sprays (to 10 inches) of violet-purple flowers.

Aster novae-angliae ‘Purple Dome' Aster novae-angliae ‘Purple Dome'
(New England aster)
(9 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Growing to less than 2 feet tall and wide, 'Purple Dome' covers itself with semi-double, deep purple, daisy-like flowers from late summer to midfall. In addition to being mildew resistant, it attracts butterflies. It's great as a border specimin and as a cut flower.

Aster oblongifolius 'October Skies' Aster oblongifolius 'October Skies'
(October skies aster)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'October Skies' is a dwarf aster that is low to the ground and mounding. It flowers in the fall when most other plants have finished for the season, covering itself with hundreds of dark sky-blue flowers.

Aster tataricus Aster tataricus
(Tatarian aster)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Tatarian aster is an impressive, stately perennial with a flowering height of 3 to 6 feet. It can look you in the eye yet require no staking. More important, this aster flowers longer than any other garden aster, beginning in late September and early October and continuing into November. The 1-inch-wide, light lavender flowers are a magnet for local and migrating monarch butterflies. This plant tolerates many soil types, can form large colonies in a few years, and is easily divided.

Aster tongolensis Aster tongolensis
(East Indies aster)
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This is a mat-forming aster with thick, almost leafless stems that support solitary, violet-blue ray florets and orange-yellow disk florets.

Astilbe chinensis 'Maggie Daley' Astilbe chinensis 'Maggie Daley'
('Maggie Daley' astilbe)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In late spring, lavender-pink flowers rise above this plant’s lacy, fernlike foliage, which forms an airy network beneath. The blooms appear a bit later than typical for other astilbes, and they extend later into summer. ‘Maggie Daley’ is moderately drought tolerant once established. Pair it with Japanese painted fern (Athyrium niponicum var. pictum, Zones 5–8) for a beautiful combination. And deer and rabbit resistance is the pièce de résistance! -Kielian DeWitt, Fine Gardening #147 (Octover 2012), page 76

Astilbe chinensis var. pumila Astilbe chinensis var. pumila
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a dwarf astilbe with attractive red-green leaves and reddish pink flowers in broad, dense conical groups. Its blooms appear mostly in summer.

Astilboides tabularis Astilboides tabularis
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This unique species bears large, rounded leaves that resemble lily pads and seem to defy gravity.

Astrantia major Astrantia major
(Masterwort)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Masterwort produces many small, ivory flowers that are flushed pink and bloom continuously throughout the summer and fall, wafting a sweet scent. Like Queen Anne’s lace, each masterwort blossom is an umbel of tiny flowers, framed by a collar of papery bracts.

Athyrium 'Ghost' Athyrium 'Ghost'
(Ghost fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Here's a fern with an upright habit and silvery fronds that give it a ghostly look, hence the name. Emerging new fronds have a shimmering whitish color that darkens slowly to a silvery green with burgundy accents. 'Ghost' spreads slowly by shallow rhizomes, eventuallly becoming an excellent ground cover. -Matt Griswold, Regional Picks: Northeast, Fine Gardening issue #127

Athyrium filix-femina ‘Vernoniae Cristatum’ Athyrium filix-femina ‘Vernoniae Cristatum’
(Crested lady fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This small fern is popular and easy to grow. It's suited to the front edge of a border. This cultivar has arching, ruffled fronds that divide into tassels at the ends.

Athyrium niponicum var. 'Pictum' Athyrium niponicum var. 'Pictum'
(Japanese painted fern)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This fern has cool, grey-green, almost silvery, foliage and reddish-purple stalks that are useful for brightening dark spots in borders. It is deciduous, and although it reaches only 8 to 12 inches in height, it is easy to grow, prolific, and easily divided.

Athyrium niponicum var. pictum 'Burgundy Lace' Athyrium niponicum var. pictum 'Burgundy Lace'
('Burgundy Lace' Japanese painted fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Burgundy Lace' is a real showstopper in shady borders and containers, with its silvery purple-bronze fronds. The low-growing clumps are a good choice for edging pathways, and the plant looks terrific when planted in groups. 'Burgundy Lace' grows best in humus-rich, moist soil but will also adapt to conditions that are less than ideal. -Chris Kelley, Regional Picks: Midwest, Fine Gardening issue #120

Athyrium niponicum var. pictum 'Ursula's Red' Athyrium niponicum var. pictum 'Ursula's Red'
('Ursula's Red' Japanese painted fern)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The broad silvery leaves of ‘Ursula’s Red’ have a showy burgundy band at the center of the leaves in spring. This plant can double in size in a single growing season, as it spreads from rhizomes. Though deer do like it, it may simply grow more fronds and not show any lasting damage. --Michael Ruggiero, Regional Picks: Mid-Atlantic, Fine Gardening issue #127

Aucuba japonica 'Variegata' Aucuba japonica 'Variegata'
(Gold-dust plant)
(4 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The dense, glossy foliage of this evergreen plant is splattered with yellow. Gold-dust plant can be planted near nearby tree roots, and it responds well to pruning. Combine it with yellow-blooming or variegated plants for appealing color harmonies. -Debra Lee Baldwin, Regional Picks: Southern California, Fine Gardening issue #127

Aucuba japonica Aucuba japonica
(Japanese laurel)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Aucuba are grown for their bold foliage, autumn fruit, and adaptability to shade, dry soil, pollution, and coastal conditions. A. japonica is a rounded, evergreen shrub with small, reddish purple flowers in spring, and red berries (on female plants) in fall. It grows to about 10 feet tall and wide. 'Crotonifolia' has leaves that look like they were speckled with yellow paint. 'Gold Dust' is female with heavy yellow speckling. 'Mr. Goldstrike' is male, more upright, and has gold-splashed leaves. Use as a hedge or specimen, in a container outdoors, or as an imposing houseplant.

Baptisia 'Carolina Moonlight' Baptisia 'Carolina Moonlight'
('Carolina Moonlight' false indigo)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This spectacular perennial hybrid has 18-inch-tall spires of buttery yellow flowers in late spring and beautiful blue-green foliage throughout summer. Tough, exceptionally drought tolerant, and extremely long-lived, it's the southern substitute for the much sought-after lupine. 'Carolina Moonlight' has an adaptable, easy-to-grow nature and makes a great companion for other rugged plants such as ornamental grasses.

no image available Baptisia 'Chocolate Chip'
(Chocolate Chip false indigo)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This perennial produces milk chocolate-colored flowering buds that open in spring with golden yellow petals over blue-green foliage.

Baptisia × variicolor Twilite Prairieblues™ Baptisia × variicolor Twilite Prairieblues™
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This amazing baptisia is a cross between B. australis, the most common blue variety, and B. sphaerocarpa, a plant with yellow bloomer. The result is pea-like violet-purple flowers with dramatic yellow keels. It is long-lived, tough, and drought resistant, but it may take three or four gardening seasons to establish itself. Twilite Prairieblues™ blooms in late spring or early summer, When not in bloom, the plant remains attractive because of the lovely blue-green color of its trifoliate leaves, especially in spring. This plant is tall and will look good at the back of a border. -Stephanie Cohen, Plants to know and grow, Fine Gardening issue #120

Baptisia australis Baptisia australis
(blue false indigo, Plains false indigo)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

False blue indigo's spikes of clear blue flowers in late spring can nearly carry a border by themselves. They also make great cut flowers. Large, inflated nearly black seed pods set in after flowering, giving this plant another interesting element. It is low maintenance and will look great in any natural or informal setting.

Begonia 'Cowardly Lion' Begonia 'Cowardly Lion'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Unlike many other shade garden plants with their cool blue colors, 'Cowardly Lion' rex begonia offers rich warm tones. Chocolate-colored leaf veins veil the golden leaves, which become darker with age and make a fine counterpoint to yellow-based foliage plants. -Rita Randolph, Rex begonias, Fine Gardening issue #120

Begonia 'Crackling Fire' Begonia 'Crackling Fire'
('Crackling Fire' begonia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Gorgeous new series of boliviensis begonias in six colors – Red, Orange, Yellow, Creamy Yellow, Pink and White. Perfect for baskets and containers. Plants are more sun and drought tolerant than other begonias. Crackling Fire begonias are low maintenance and self-cleaning. Plants are loaded with flowers and bloom continuously until frost. Their sturdy, upright habit prevents breakage.  Plants reach a height of 4-10 inches with a spread of up to 10 inches. Crackling Fire is perfect as a container plant or hanging basket and thrives in full to partial sun. -Suntory Collection

Begonia 'Escargot' Begonia 'Escargot'
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Escargot' takes its name from the snail-like curl pattern at the base of the leaf. The foliage is striking enough to stand on its own but it's a good mixer, too. Use it with other foliage plants and brightly colored blooms. This is an extremely popular Rex hybrid begonia. -Rita Randolph, Rex begonias, Fine Gardening issue #120

Begonia 'Fireworks' Begonia 'Fireworks'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Like other Rex begonias, 'Fireworks' is noteworthy for the coloration of its foliage. Its silvery leaves are edged in purple and have a black burst of fireworks in the center. Use it in a container or shady garden, or grow it as a houseplant. -Rita Randolph, Rex begonias, Fine Gardening issue #120

Begonia 'Green Gold' Begonia 'Green Gold'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The leaves of 'Green Gold' are predominantly silver with deep green veining. New leaves are edged in burgundy. The silver color brightens up shady areas.  'Green Gold' grows vigorously and harmonizes well with other shade plants. -Rita Randolph, Rex begonias, Fine Gardening issue #120

Begonia 'Marmaduke' Begonia 'Marmaduke'
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Marmaduke' Rex begonia sports chocolate-colored speckles across golden leaves. The earth tones of 'Marmaduke' go well with solid-colored foliage plants and yellow or rusty-hued blooms. -Rita Randolph, Rex begonias, Fine Gardening issue #120

Begonia 'River Nile' Begonia 'River Nile'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Unlike other Rex begonias, 'River Nile' isn't flashy. Its charm comes from the leaves, which are green and ruffled, with a deep bronze edging. -Rita Randolph, Rex begonias, Fine Gardening issue #120

Begonia 'Stained Glass' Begonia 'Stained Glass'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Stained Glass' is simply stunning. Ruby red leaves are rimmed in pewter with dark veining at the center and a rosy underside. This Rex begonia goes well with pink plants or flowers. -Rita Randolph, Rex begonias, Fine Gardening issue #120

Begonia grandis ssp. evansiana Begonia grandis ssp. evansiana
(Hardy begonia)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This tuberous begonia bears green heart-shaped foliage with red veining and claret-stained undersides that steal the show when backlit. Pendent clusters of slightly fragrant, satiny pink or white blossoms open from midsummer until frost. It makes a good perennial companion for ferns and hostas.

Bellis perennis Bellis perennis
(English daisy)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

English daisy bears stems topped with a single white, daisy-like flower. The flowers are tinged maroon and yellow; but cultivars are available with single, semi-double, or double button flowers in shades of white, pink, salmon, and ruby. The plant's smooth, spoon-shaped leaves form neat rosettes. This carpeting perennial is often grown as a biennial. Its many cultivars are used for bedding out or container displays.

Berberis × stenophylla 'Corallina Compacta' Berberis × stenophylla 'Corallina Compacta'
(Compact coral barberry)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

"Thorny but irresistible" best describes this low-maintenance, elfin barberry. Tiny leaves are smothered in coral-colored buds opening to bright yellow-orange spring flowers. These, in turn, produce silver-frosted, blue-black berries in fall. 'Corallina Compacta' is evergreen, tolerates most soil types, and is pest-free and drought tolerant once established.

Berberis thunbergii Berberis thunbergii
(Japanese barberry)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Grown for its neat habit, yellow flowers, and red fruit, this shrub spreads prolifically by seed and is considered invasive in some areas, including the Northeast. Alternatives include bayberry (Myrica pensylvanica) and winterberry (Ilex verticillata). The many cultivars include 'Atropurpurea Nana' (red-purple foliage); 'Aurea' (bright yellow young foliage); 'Pink Queen' (variegated); and 'Silver Beauty' (leaves mottled creamy white).

Berberis thunbergii 'Golden Nugget' Berberis thunbergii 'Golden Nugget'
(Dwarf Japanese barberry)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Golden Nugget' is a deciduous shrub with non-burning foliage. It is a slow grower (to only about 1 foot tall) and makes a good border plant, especially when planted with darker foliage plants or brightly colored flowers, or a groundcover. Grow in full sun for best color and berry production. It tolerates poor soils as long as drainage is good.The foliage has an orange cast for most of the season, which intensifies in the autumn.

Berberis thunbergii f. atropurpurea Berberis thunbergii f. atropurpurea
(Red Japanese barberry)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Red Japanese barberry is a deciduous shrub with multi-season interest. Most striking are the deep reddish purple inch-long leaves. In spring, scented yellow flowers appear on arching stems. This barberry is an excellent hedge pland, and it also looks good in the middle to rear of beds and borders. Watch out for the brittle, three-pronged thorns. -Gerald Gibbens, Regional Picks: Northwest, Fine Gardening issue#120

Bergenia ciliata Bergenia ciliata
(Winter begonia)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant's leaves are large and bright green, with fine hairs, and grow to about 12 inches across. Small pink flowers emerge in spring, but it's the foliage that really shines.

Bergenia cillata Bergenia cillata
(Hairy bergenia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is the most drought-tolerant bergenia I’ve found and the only one that does well in Texas heat. The large, hairy, critter-resistant leaves do not resemble other members of this genus; they look more like hairy plates or giant African violet leaves—hence, it’s common name. Mature plants will send up 10-inch-long stems of white to pale pink flowers from spring to early summer, but the real reason to grow this plant is its remarkable foliage.
In cooler regions, hairy bergenia grows not only in the shade but also in full sun. It isn’t particular about soil type or pH. Divide plants every three to five years to keep them vigorous. -Jimmy Turner, Perennials for dry shade, Fine Gardening issue #133

Bergenia cordifolia Bergenia cordifolia
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant is noted for its beautiful bronze fall foliage. Its leaves are rounded to heart-shaped and sometimes puckered, growing to about 12 inches. It bears pink to rose-red flowers on red stalks in late winter to early spring.

Beta vulgaris 'Bull's Blood' Beta vulgaris 'Bull's Blood'
(Beet)
(1 user review)

This heirloom beet from 1840 is primarily grown for its tender, sweet, deep red-burgundy foliage, but the beets are tasty when harvested at the 2- to 3-inch size. The glossy leaves reach 18 inches high. Though it is edible, it is often grown as an ornamental, and its dark leaves contrast nicely with many garden plants.

Beta vulgaris 'Ruby Red' Beta vulgaris 'Ruby Red'
(Swiss chard)
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This is a sweet Swiss chard with beautiful candy-apple-red stalks and dark green, crinkly leaves with touches of red. Both the leaves and the stalks are very ornamental and 'Ruby Red' is great in a vegetable or cottage garden, or in an ornamental bed or border. It is especially attractive when grown with plants whose colors call attention to the red coloring. Although related to beets, the root is inedible, but the leafy greens are valued for their mild flavor and high nutritional value.

Bidens aristosa Bidens aristosa
(Tickseed sunflower, Long-bracted beggar-ticks)
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This fast-growing annual of the Midwestern wet meadows grows to 4 or 5 feet tall. Hundreds of 2-inch golden daisies with buttery tips and dark, fringed eyes smother fine foliage in late summer. Be cautioned, this plant generously self-sows, and is on Kentucky's invasive plant list.

Bignonia capreolata 'Tangerine Beauty' Bignonia capreolata 'Tangerine Beauty'
('Tangerine Beauty' cross vine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A better-behaved cousin to the less-than-polite trumpet vine, cross vine is a colorful solution for a fence or arbor with afternoon shade. Although this east Texas native is slow to establish, ‘Tangerine Beauty’ sports brighter, showier flowers than other cultivars and will reward your patience with loads of orange blooms in both spring and fall. Flowers bloom on old wood, so prune this vine immediately only after blooms fade. -Leslie Finical Halleck, Fine Gardening #147 (October 2012), page 74

Boltonia asteroides Boltonia asteroides
(False chamomile)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Boltonias are vigorous perennials grown for their sprays of aster-like flowers, which appear above clean, gray-green foliage. Their vigorous nature makes them suitable for naturalizing. They are also great in the border (and for cutting), but will benefit from frequent dividing to keep in bounds, and may be cut back in late spring for more compact plants.

Boltonia asteroides 'Snowbank' Boltonia asteroides 'Snowbank'
(False chamomile)
(1 user review)

Boltonias are vigorous perennials grown for their sprays of aster-like flowers, which appear above clean, gray-green foliage. Their vigorous nature makes them suitable for naturalizing. They are also great in the border (and for cutting), but will benefit from frequent dividing to keep in bounds, and may be cut back in late spring for more compact plants. 'Snowbank' produces masses of white flowers in late summer.

Borago officinalis Borago officinalis
(Borage, Cool-tankard, Talewort)
(1 user review)

These fast-growing plants with succulent, bristly stems are old-fashioned favorites of the border or herb garden. They self sow to produce a succession throughout the season of new plants and blossoms. The beautiful flowers are edible and are particularly bequiling on salad or floating in summer drinks. 

Bouteloua gracilis Bouteloua gracilis
(Blue grama, Signal-arm grass, Mosquito grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Blue grama is a perennial grass from the Americas bearing unusually bent and flattened inflorescences. Being native to open grasslands, they are drought tolerant and at home in meadows. They provide the garden with shades of tan that persist throughout winter. 

Bouteloua gracilis 'Hachita' Bouteloua gracilis 'Hachita'
('Hachita' Blue Grama Grass)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Hachita' has narrow, blue-green leaves that form dense mounds. In summer, elongated seedheads add visual interest. This tough, drought-tolerant grass thrives in sand or clay soil with full-sun exposure. It needs a setting with good drainage, as it won't thrive in wet conditions. -Scott Vogt, Native grasses, Fine Gardening issue #124

Brachycome 'Blue Zephyr' Brachycome 'Blue Zephyr'
(Swan River daisy)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Swan River daisy's lacy foliage and small but profuse blue-purple flowers have a long season of impact in the garden. Its compact, bushy shape, pretty fragrant flowers, and gray-green leaves make it attractive from planting time through frost. It flowers so heavily that the foliage is often obscured. 'Blue Zephyr' has especially fine foliage and only reaches about a foot high. It is excellent in hanging baskets, window boxes, or other containers, or at the front of a bed or border.

Brassica oleracea Brassica oleracea
(Ornamental cabbage, Ornamental kale)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Rosettes of cabbage foliage are grown as annuals for fall and winter interest. Color intensifies in cooler temperatures (below 50°F). Good for bedding and containers.

Breynia disticha 'Roseo-picta' Breynia disticha 'Roseo-picta'
(Snow bush)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The white- and pink-mottled leaves of 'Roseo-picta' make it appear as if the plant has been snowed upon, even though it is a tropical plant. It is an evergreen shrub growing to 3 feet or more with pink and red stems in zigzagged formation. Native to Pacific islands, it is grown as an indoor plant or perennial, or as an annual in cooler climates. The tiny flowers go generally unnoticed. Do not allow the soil to dry out, as leaf drop will occur.

Broussonetia papyrifera 'Golden Shadow' Broussonetia papyrifera 'Golden Shadow'
(Golden paper mulberry)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This golden-leaved version of the southern paper mulberry can be treated as a cutback shrub to control size and for best production of brilliant golden yellow, large, lobed leaves. Or it can be allowed to grow into a small- to medium-sized tree. It's a most desirable garden plant and looks fabulous with deep blue salvias.

Browallia americana Browallia americana
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant produces distinct, 2-inch blossoms primarily in rich blue (but also in shades of purple and white), with dark eyes smudged white. It is suitable for sun and partial shade.

Brugmansia 'Charles Grimaldi' Brugmansia 'Charles Grimaldi'
(Gold angels' trumpets)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Foot-long blossoms are nocturnally fragrant, and pour out from narrow calyces of light yellow, to terminate in fluted, reflexed openings the hues of golden summer squash.

Brugmansia suaveolens Brugmansia suaveolens
(Angels' trumpet)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Few plants evoke tropicalia quite like the Brugmansias, with their voluminous tubular flowers that drip from imposing shrubs or small trees. They look fantastic in containers or plunged into a border, and the dramatic display persists from late spring until autumn. In cooler climates, they may be brought under glass or cut back and held dormant in a cool basement.  All parts are highly toxic if ingested.

Brugmansia suaveolens 'Pink Delight' Brugmansia suaveolens 'Pink Delight'
(Angels' trumpet)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Foot-long, rich pink blossoms are nocturnally fragrant and pour out from narrow calyces to terminate in wide, flared openings.

Brunnera macrophylla Brunnera macrophylla
(Siberian bugloss)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This woodland plant is valued for its flowers and groundcovering leaves. Terminal clusters of delicate blue flowers appear in spring. 

Brunnera macrophylla 'Jack Frost' Brunnera macrophylla 'Jack Frost'
(4 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This woodland plant is valued for its flowers and its heart-shaped, ground-covering leaves. Its small blue flowers go nicely with ephemeral bulbs in mid- to late spring,  as the enlarging leaves block out the ripening bulb foliage. 'Jack Frost' can take dry summers and wet winters. This cultivar is prized for its improved tolerance of heat and sun. -Marty Hair, Regional Picks: Upper Midwest, Fine Gardening issue# 127

no image available Brunnera macrophylla 'Langtrees'
(Siberian bugloss)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This woodland plant is valued for its flowers and heart-shaped, groundcovering leaves. 'Langtrees' can take dry summers and wet winters. This cultivar is prized for its improved tolerance of heat and sun.

Brunnera macrophylla 'Looking Glass' Brunnera macrophylla 'Looking Glass'
(Siberian bugloss)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This brunnera cultivar has a silvery, heart-shaped leaves that are mostly everygreen. Delicate blue flowers emerge in spring. Drought tolerant once established, ‘Looking Glass’ brunnera requires little watering and is fairly resistant to pests. This cultivar grows to a little more than a foot tall and almost as wide. Use it in a woodland or shade garden, in a container, or at waterside. -Sylvia Matlock, Regional Picks: Northwest, Fine Gardening issue #127

Buddleia 'Lochinch' Buddleia 'Lochinch'
(Butterfly bush, Summer lilac)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Butterfly bushes are carefree deciduous shrubs that are reliably fragrant and easy to grow. Butterflies swarm to their blooms all summer long. 'Lochinch' has extremely fragrant lilac-blue flowers with orange eyes. It is a cross between B. davidii and B. fallowiana. Its arching, mounded habit typically reaches 3 to 5 feet in one season, but can grow much taller in the deep South. The 8-  to 12-inch-long flower spikes begin in late summer and bloom until frost, starting a little later than the B. davidii cultivars.

Buddleia bicolor Buddleia bicolor
(Bicolor butterfly bush)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Butterflies can’t resist this fast-growing shrub! The gorgeous, bi-colored blooms are wonderfully-fragrant and unattractive to pesky deer. Best of all, it begins blooming in midsummer, when gardens need an extra jolt of color. -American Meadows

Buddleia davidii Buddleia davidii
(Butterfly bush, Summer lilac)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This sun-lover comes in hues from pure white to deepest purple. From midsummer until frost, butterfly bush earns its name as hordes of winged beauties flit from flower to flower in search of nectar. The lanceolate leaves are 10 to 12 inches long and white or grayish underneath. The honey-scented flowers are deep purple and grow in spikes, from July to October.

Buddleia davidii 'Black Knight' Buddleia davidii 'Black Knight'
(Butterfly bush, Summer lilac)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Butterfly bushes are carefree deciduous shrubs that are reliably fragrant and easy to grow. Butterflies swarm to their blooms all summer long. 'Black Knight' has deep purple-blue, almost black, flowers in elongated clusters on arching branches to 10 feet tall if not cut back, and half that size if cut back. The blooms come from early summer to first frost. The foliage is willow-like and grayish green.

Caladium bicolor 'Freida Hemple' Caladium bicolor 'Freida Hemple'
(Angel wings, Elephant's ears, Heart of Jesus, Mother-in-law plant)
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C. bicolor is a tuberous-rooted perennial of garden origin often grown in containers, as annuals, and as indoor plants. The large, heart-shaped leaves of 'Freida Hemple' caladium are edged in bright green and have bold red centers. Caladiums are excellent choices to add color, texture, and form to shady areas.

Caladium bicolor 'White Queen' Caladium bicolor 'White Queen'
(Angel wings, Elephant's ears, Heart of Jesus, Mother-in-law plant)
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A tuberous-rooted perennial most often grown as an annual or a houseplant, 'White Queen' has large frosted-looking white leaves that have green margins and bright red veins that "bleed". A great plant for full shade, it can also be grown in sun if provided with consistently moist soil. Greenish-white flower spathes appear in spring and are followed by white berries, but the foliage is the main show. Its arrow-shaped leaves light up a dark spot and work well as bedding or in containers. It can also be grown as a houseplant and tubers can be overwintered indoors.

Calamagrostis × acutiflora 'Karl Foerster' Calamagrostis × acutiflora 'Karl Foerster'
(Karl Foerster's Feather Reed Grass)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Versatile, attractive and care-free ornamental grass with wheat-like appearance. Slender, upright, deep-green, lustrous foliage becomes effective by early spring and lasts all the way until winter. A cool season grass, 'Karl Foester' is upright and clump forming, with purplish-green, feathery plumes to 6'. It distinctively blooms in early summer rather than fall and must have winter chill to bloom. Long lived -- 25 years or more. -Santa Rosa Gardens

Calamagrostis 'Karl Foerster' Calamagrostis 'Karl Foerster'
(Karl Foerster feather reed grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This versatile ornamental grass has slender, upright, deep-green foliage. A cool season grass, it is upright and clump forming, with purplish-green, feathery plumes that can reach 6 feet in height. It blooms in early summer rather than fall and must have winter chill to bloom.



Information provided by Santa Rosa Gardens.

Calamintha grandiflora 'Variegata' Calamintha grandiflora 'Variegata'
(Calamint)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A well-behaved perennial from the mint family (Lamiaceae), variegated calamint has pale-green, oval leaves with strong white marbling. It sends up a wealth of clear-pink tubular flowers that muster an army of bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds from mid- to late summer. It’s eye-catching both in and out of bloom and has a wonderful minty fragrance all season long.

Calendula officinalis Calendula officinalis
(Pot marigold)
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Pot marigolds bloom most of the summer, but are intolerant of intense heat and may die out during periods of hot humid weather. Their branching stems are covered with simple, alternate leaves and they produce large flowers in different hues of yellow and orange in the summer.

Calibrachoa 'Callie Rose Star’ Calibrachoa 'Callie Rose Star’
(Callie Rose Star)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This rose-and-cream Calibrachoa is one of a kind. The unique markings on the petals and the plant's mounding habit make it a standout in hanging baskets and containers.

Calibrachoa 'Superbells Tequila Sunrise' Calibrachoa 'Superbells Tequila Sunrise'
(Millon bells, Trailing petunia)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Calibrachoa is a relatively new genus of flowering plants. The first cultivars weren't released until 1992. This cultivar's self-cleaning, petunia-like flowers are painted in a sunny mix of orange, red, and yellow. It is an easy-to-grow, trailing perennial, often used as an annual in hanging baskets, window boxes, and other containers.

Calibrachoa 'Million Bells' Calibrachoa 'Million Bells'
('Million Bells' calibrachoa)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Million Bells were the very first calibrachoa series on the market. This exciting new plant category was created in 1993 by the breeders at Suntory Flowers in Japan. Available in a broad spectrum of colors, Million Bells are perfect in pots, hanging baskets, window boxes and landscapes. These hybrids are heat tolerant, cold hardy and amazingly prolific, blooming well into fall. Choose from trailing, mounding and more compact Bouquet types. For best results, plant in full sun.

Calibrachoa Superbells® Cherry Star Calibrachoa Superbells® Cherry Star
(Superbells® Cherry Star Calibrachoa )
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

From Proven Winners: There is nothing more super than Superbells. If there was a word that meant extra, extra super it still wouldn't be as super as we are. Calibrachoas are a new type of plants that sort of look like little Petunias, which makes sense seeing as were related. Only Superbells aren't sticky, perk right back up after it rains, and stay compact and bushy even when were stressed. Superbells are Proven Winners newest Calibrachoas. Were the ones covered with hundreds of flowers from early spring all the way through those first light frosts. Just 6 - 10 inches tall, our long, long, trailing branches cascade over the sides of hanging baskets and other containers, and spread over flower beds. Hummingbirds are cuckoo about us.

Calibrachoa Superbells® Dreamsicle Calibrachoa Superbells® Dreamsicle
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Calibrachoas are great alternatives to petunias. Superbells® Dreamsicle is cloaked with larger-than-usual, yellow-throated apricot-orange flowers. It can create a carpet of color or cascade beautifully from a container.

Calibrachoa Superbells® Lemon Slice Calibrachoa Superbells® Lemon Slice
(Superbells® Lemon Slice Calibrachoa )
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

From Proven Winners: The unique bicolor pattern of white and bright yellow has never been seen in a Calibrachoa, and it is sure to capture your attention.

Callicarpa americana Callicarpa americana
(American beautyberry)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Although it produces small, lavender-pink flowers in spring, this plant is known mainly for its violet to magenta berries, which start appearing in October. The berries, massed in tight bunches that encircle the branches, are vivid against deep-green leaves.

Callicarpa dichotoma Callicarpa dichotoma
(Purple beautyberry)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Grown for its rows of lilac-violet, round, glossy, tiny fruit, purple beautyberry is a small, deciduous shrub native to China, Korea, and Japan. Its long, arching branches often touch the ground, giving it an elegant shape. The small pink flowers in summer are followed by the small fruits that ripen in September and last through October. It has good yellow fall color as well.

Callirhoë involucrata Callirhoë involucrata
(Wine-cups)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant resembles a rosy-purple poppy mallow that blooms all summer. The saucer-shaped flowers are held above prostrate red stems and fingered leaves.

Callistemon citrinus 'Splendens' Callistemon citrinus 'Splendens'
('Splendens' bottlebrush)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This low-care, evergreen shrub to 10-15 feet tall and wide produces large, bright red bottlebrush flowers from spring through summer followed by woody seedpods. It is attractive to hummingbirds. Young shoots are pinkish red.

Calluna vulgaris 'Spring Torch' Calluna vulgaris 'Spring Torch'
(Scotch heather, Ling)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Spring Torch' gets its name from the vibrant color of its new growth in spring. The mid-green leaves are tipped in shades of cream, orange, and red. Later in the summer, mauve-pink flower spikes cover the plant and last into the fall. As cold weather sets in, leaves acquire bronze or purple tones, adding further interest. This small, mounding evergreen shrub makes a good groundcover or rock garden plant. Bees love it. Different cultivars are beautiful woven together in the garden to form a colorful tapestry.

Calocedrus decurrens Calocedrus decurrens
(California incense cedar)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This large, conical-shaped tree has dark green flattened sprays of evergreen scale-like leaves.

Calycanthus 'Venus' Calycanthus 'Venus'
('Venus' sweetshrub)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This deciduous shrub to 8-10 feet tall and wide blooms from late spring through July with 3- to 4-inch-wide, white, fragrant, magnolia-like blossoms with purple centers. This shrub is somewhat deer resistant.

Calycanthus floridus Calycanthus floridus
(Carolina allspice, Strawberry shrub, Common sweetshrub)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This deciduous shrub has a dense, rounded habit, growing 6 to 9 feet tall and as wide. Its unusual, waterlily-like, fragrant flowers combine the scent of strawberries, banana, and pineapple. Flowers appear in May and continuing blooming on and off into June and July. The dark green leaves and bark release a clove or camphor-like scent when crushed.

Camassia leichtlinii ssp. suksdorfii 'Blue Danube' Camassia leichtlinii ssp. suksdorfii 'Blue Danube'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Spikes of violet, star-shaped flowers top stems reaching from 2 to 4 feet in late spring. The species is native to western Oregon. 'Blue Danube' would be beautiful in a border, meadow, or containers. Camassia make good cut flowers.

Camellia japonica Camellia japonica
(Camellia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Japanese camellias shine in winter, with their glossy, deep green leaves and brilliant symmetry. Red, pink, and white lowers appear in spring, and they range from solids to stripes and from single cups of petals to tight double blooms. -Nellie Neal, Regional Picks: Southeast, Fine Gardening issue #127

no image available Camellia oleifera
(Camellia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This small tree from China can reach a little over 20 feet tall and about half as wide. It blooms in winter or early spring, bearing single white flowers that are fragrant. Grow this elegant shrub in a border or woodland garden, as a specimen, or in a container.

Campanula 'Elizabeth' Campanula 'Elizabeth'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Starting in early summer and continuing until fall, 'Elizabeth' puts forth abundant purple-flushed, pale pink bells with dark speckles on the inside. Flowers are 2 to 3 inches long and lightly scented. The toothed leaves are bright green. This low-maintenance, hardy perennial retains its evergreen foliage through winter.

By late fall, as the older crowns die out, new rosettes of leaves appear at the ends of underground rhizomes, giving the illusion that the plants have moved. This is not a desirable trait in formal beds, but it's an asset in naturalized plantings. 'Elizabeth' does well under deciduous trees and shrubs, in cottage and rock gardens, and along paths that leat into the woods. -Ruth Rogers Clausen, Plants to know and grow, Fine Gardening issue #121

Campanula 'Pink Octopus' Campanula 'Pink Octopus'
('Pink Octopus' spreading bellflower)
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I have a penchant for vigorous, spreading plants: For the price of one plant I can get tons more for free. Plus, plants that spread out are naturals for dry shade; the expanded network of root systems feeds the whole plant, helping it get the water it needs. ‘Pink Octopus’ quickly forms wide mats of tall, deeply cut, light green foliage. Throughout spring, octopus-shaped, candy pink flowers float in a mass over the foliage, sporadically appearing throughout summer. I use this plant as the horticultural equivalent of a slipcover to coat large areas of shade quickly, especially because it can handle the extremes of my Texas climate. This perennial is maintenance-free, other than keeping it from encroaching on less vigorous plants. -Jimmy Turner, Perennials for dry shade, Fine Gardening issue #133

Campanula carpatica Campanula carpatica
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Upright, open bell-shaped flowers completely cover the foliage of this late-blooming Campanula for several months in summer. This small plant is suitable for the front of the border or a rock garden. Numerous cultivars are available.

Campanula cochleariifolia Campanula cochleariifolia
(Fairies’ thimbles)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Diminutive (to 2 inches tall) spikes bear lavender-blue nodding flowers that sway in the breeze.

Campanula lactiflora Campanula lactiflora
(Milky bellflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This upright bellflower grows to 4 or 5 feet with rounded leaves and conical spires of bell-shaped flowers in shades of blue, violet, or white.

Campanula medium ‘Calycanthema’ Campanula medium ‘Calycanthema’
(Canterbury bells, Cup and Saucer)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This 2- to 3-foot-tall bellflower bears single or double flowers in white, blue, or pink. 

Campanula persicifolia Campanula persicifolia
(Peach-leaved bellflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant is one of the most popular campanulas. Its stiff mat of slowly spreading evergreen rosettes is topped by 3-foot-tall, all open, bell-shaped lavender to white flowers in late spring.

Campanula portenschlagiana Campanula portenschlagiana
(Dalmatian bellflower)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This low, mat-forming plant has blue-purple flowers in summer.

Campanula poscharskyana 'Blue Waterfall' Campanula poscharskyana 'Blue Waterfall'
(Serbian bellflower)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Serbian bellflowers have an easy, undemanding habit. Creating a stream of lavender blue, the 1-inch-diameter star-shaped blossoms bloom reliably from late spring to early fall. The foliage remains evergreen in mild winters and needs to be sheared only once in a while to keep its appearance tidy. 'Blue Waterfall' flows beautifully along bed edges and through rock gardens in full sun to partial shade.

Campanula punctata Campanula punctata
(Spotted bellflower)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Spotted bellflower has heart-shaped foliage on a creeping rhizome with tubular, bell-shaped creamy white to dusky pink flowers with red spots and hairs. This foot-tall bellflower is native to Siberia and Japan.

Campsis radicans Campsis radicans
(Trumpet creeper)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Trumpet creeper is a vigorous climber with clusters of  trumpet-shaped orange to red flowers from late summer to autumn.

Canna 'Centenaire de Rozain-Bourcharlat' Canna 'Centenaire de Rozain-Bourcharlat'
(Indian shot)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This 3-foot-tall canna from the 1920s has impossibly deep, pure-rose flowers recalling orchids and leis. It's an old French variety.

Canna 'Erebus' Canna 'Erebus'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Each of this plant's stunning lance-shaped leaves is the softest gray-green, edged subtly with a cream-colored pinstripe. These luminous 5-foot-tall plants are crowned with spires of delicate pink flowers with just a blush of salmon.

Canna 'Madame Paul Caseneuve' Canna 'Madame Paul Caseneuve'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A great canna to start with if you're convinced you hate them is 'Madame Paul Caseneuve', from 1902. The pearly-bronze leaves and almost purple stems of this 3- to 5-foot-tall antique beauty are the perfect foil for its elegant, sensual flowers of soft pink shading to peach and apricot.

Canna 'Sémaphore' Canna 'Sémaphore'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Growing to 6 or 7 feet, 'Sémaphore' features slender, dark-bronze leaves topped by spikes of narrow-petaled flowers of an unusual glowing color that's not quite yellow and not quite orange; perhaps flickering tongues of flame would be the best description. It is a Victorian classic from 1895.

Canna ‘Phasion’ Canna ‘Phasion’
(Tropicanna® canna)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This vigorous 5- to 6-foot plant sports fascinating foliage colors. Spring leaves emerge an intense purple and are soon striped with green, yellow, pink, and red. Vivid orange flowers appear in summer on this quick multiplier.

Canna × generalis Canna × generalis
(Indian shot)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Cannas bear broad, smooth paddle-like leaves reminiscent of banana plants. The oversize leaves make it easy to create dramatic combinations with other, more finely textured plants. Each stout, fleshy stem is topped with attractive spires of brightly colored flowers. Cultivars vary widely in height, foliage, and bloom.

Canna var. “MACtro’ Canna var. “MACtro’
(Canna Tropicanna Gold )
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Tropicanna Gold is perhaps the showiest of all of the variegated cannas and one of the best for hot, humid, sunny southern gardens. Favored for its bright green and yellow variegated foliage and deep tangerine flowers, Tropicanna Gold will grow at the edge of ponds in shallow water as well as in normal garden conditions. It is adaptable to heat and humidity. Protect in the northern part of its range, or lift tubers in fall where not hardy and store over winter.

Capsicum annuum 'Black Pearl' Capsicum annuum 'Black Pearl'
(Ornamental pepper)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This pepper boasts the most dramatically deep purple-black leaves and fruit imaginable. The vigorous, bushy plants grow to 18 inches tall and almost as wide. Flowers are lilac, and dark black peppers emerge in fall.

Carex buchananii Carex buchananii
(Leatherleaf sedge)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Two-foot-tall, stiff, orange-brown blades curve at the end like a shepherd’s staff. Burnished red-bronze foliage, which fades to flax at the tips, gives off a warm glow when backlit by the sun.

Carex divulsa Carex divulsa
(Berkeley sedge)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This sedge is one of the most adaptable of the ground-cover grasses. Its ability to look the same in sun or shade makes it a valuable asset in plantings that go in and out of full sun. Berkeley sedge is a good solution for areas under stress where lawn grasses often fail. The flowers are not particularly noteworthy.

Carex elata 'Aurea' Carex elata 'Aurea'
(Bowles' golden sedge)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This beautiful sedge's vivid foliage adds bright color to the garden. The yellow seems to glow in partial shade. Use this dramatic clump of foliage near water or in shallow water, or in another moist location.

Carex morrowii 'Ice Dance' Carex morrowii 'Ice Dance'
(Variegated sedge)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Ice Dance' is a dense, spreading sedge grown for its foliage. This sedge looks good year round, even in winter.The early-spring flowers are insignificant, but the white-edged leaves complement most other plants. Grow as a groundcover in woodland areas or in a shade garden. This sedge is evergreen in warm climates. -Jane Hutson, Regional Picks: Midwest, Fine Gardening issue# 127

Carex muskingumensis ‘Oehme’ Carex muskingumensis ‘Oehme’
('Oheme' palm sedge)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

With its yellow-trimmed foliage, ‘Oehme’ is truly the palm sedge with an edge. I love this species for its tropical feel and cascading texture. This North American native prefers a damp spot but tolerates many growing conditions. It’s attractive to butterflies and birds but is usually unappealing to deer. Use ‘Oehme’ to brighten a shady bed or as an ornamental approach to erosion control on a stream bank. -Justin Nichols, Fine Gardening #147 (October 2012), page 70 

Carex plantaginea Carex plantaginea
(Seersucker sedge)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Seersucker sedge is an evergreen, spreading sedge with narrow brown-black flowers on 8-inch stems in spring. Its wide, puckered foliage is shiny and bright green, reaching over a foot long. This sedge is native to rich woods of the eastern U.S. and makes a nice edger or accent plant.

Carex siderosticha 'Variegata' Carex siderosticha 'Variegata'
(Broad-leaf sedge)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This sedge's pearly, straplike leaves resemble striped ribbon waiting to be wrapped around a package. It sports fuzzy green flowers with green stamens in late spring. Grow as an edging or groundcover.

Carica papaya Carica papaya
(Papaya)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The papaya is a herbaceous, fast-growing shrub that grows best in tropical and subtropical climates where it will flower continually, but it will perform in colder climates from high summer to early fall. It offers a striking sculptural presence to the landscape due to its lobed, 2-foot-across leaves and large, delicious fruit (sometimes reaching 20 pounds).

Carpobrotus edulis Carpobrotus edulis
(Iceplant, Hottentot fig, Kaffir fig)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This ground-hugging succulent perennial roots at the nodes, has a creeping habit, and often forms deep mats covering large areas. It produces abundant yellow daisy-like flowers that open at noon and turn pink later in the day.

Caryopteris × clandonensis 'First Choice' Caryopteris × clandonensis 'First Choice'
(Blue beard, Blue-mist shrub)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'First Choice' is ideal for a mixed or shrub border. It's an attractive woody shrub with dark green leaves, dark purplish blue flowers, and a compact habit. Misty blue flowers appear in late summer and early autumn.This plant is relatively drought tolerant and very heat tolerant. The shrub expands as branches that touch the ground form their own roots and may self-seed.

Caryopteris × clandonensis 'Longwood Blue' Caryopteris × clandonensis 'Longwood Blue'
(Blue beard, blue-mist shrub)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Longwood Blue' is ideal for a mixed or shrub border. It's an attractive woody shrub up to 3 feet tall and 5 feet wide with silvery leaves and violet-blue flowers.. The flowers appear along the stems in late summer and early autumn.This plant is relatively drought tolerant and very heat tolerant. The shrub expands as branches that touch the ground form their own roots and may self-seed.

Caryopteris × clandonensis 'Worcester Gold' Caryopteris × clandonensis 'Worcester Gold'
(Blue beard, Blue-mist shrub)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Worcester Gold' is an attractive, mounding, woody shrub with warm yellow to chartreuse foliage and lavender-blue flowers in late summer and early autumn. The flowers are fragrant and attractive to bees and butterflies. The foliage is also aromatic. It is ideal for a mixed or shrub border.

Caryopteris incana 'Jason' Caryopteris incana 'Jason'
(Sunshine blue bluebeard)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Jason' has bright yellow-green foliage with rich amethyst blue flowers in late summer and fall. It's a vigorous grower for a mixed border or mass planting in sunny areas.

Catharanthus roseus 'Peach' Catharanthus roseus 'Peach'
(Madagascar periwinkle, Old maid)
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A tender perennial native to Madagascar, most often grown as an annual, Catharanthus roseus has attractive, glossy foliage and a bushy form that is covered by phlox-like flowers from summer to first frost. It is a very popular bedding plant and works in containers as well. Many cultivars are vividly colored, but 'Peach' has subtle pale pink-peach flowers with a darker eye.

Catharanthus roseus Cora™ series Catharanthus roseus Cora™ series
(Cora™ periwinkle, Cora™ vinca)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The disease-resistant Cora™ series of periwinkles comes in a range of flower colors—from white to lavender to burgundy—and looks great until the first fall frost.

Caulophyllum thalictroides Caulophyllum thalictroides
(Blue cohosh)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant's three-lobed, veined leaves are dark purple when they emerge and later turn green. Greenish brown or yellowish brown flowers appear in mid- and late spring, turning into waxy blue berries that dangle beneath the leaves.

Ceanothus americanus Ceanothus americanus
(Mountain sweet, New Jersey tea, Redroot, Wild snowball)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Mountain sweet is a low-growing, broad, compact, deciduous shrub. Dark-green leaves are irregularly toothed, 2 to 3 inches long, and softly hairy or nearly hairless beneath. This plant bears profuse white flowers in 1- to 2-inch-long terminal clusters.

Cedrus atlantica f. glauca Cedrus atlantica f. glauca
(Blue Atlas cedar)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This stunning evergreen conifer can be a very large specimen tree (to over 100 feet) in the landscape. Its young, silvery foliage turns vivid glaucous blue as it ages; the sharply pointed leaves are arranged in whorls. Female cones are green and can be up to 4 inches long; they ripen slowly over 2 years to pale brown. This tree needs a lot of space to reach its majestic potential.

Celastrus orbiculatus Celastrus orbiculatus
(Oriental bittersweet, Staff vine)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Oriental bittersweet is a vigorous, woody, deciduous climber with rounded mid-green leaves that turn yellow in autumn. It bears small green flowers in summer and axillary clusters of bead-like red berries with contrasting yellow casings in the fall. Fruit splits open to reveal pink to red seeds.

Celosia cristata 'Century' Celosia cristata 'Century'
(Plumed celosia)
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The flowers of this celosia cluster together in great numbers and look like silky, feathery plumes in vivid hues of yellow, red, magenta, or apricot. The plumes rise above the foliage on 2-foot-tall stalks, which wave their flags of color in the breeze from July to frost.

Centaurea cineraria 'Colchester White' Centaurea cineraria 'Colchester White'
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Best used as a foliage plant, this plant's intricately cut, frosty-silver leaves produce a large, elegant arching mound. It also bears pale lavender-blue pin-cushion flowers on lanky 30-inch stems in late spring.

Centaurea cyanus Centaurea cyanus
(Bachelor's buttons, Bluebottle, Cornflower)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Bachelor's buttons bear charming and prolific flowers in hues of blue, pink, lavender, white, and maroon. Those with a true blue color are especially welcome in the garden as that color is rare in nature. Each disc-shaped flower is about 1.5 inches across, with ragged petals radiating out from the center.

Centaurea macrocephala Centaurea macrocephala
(Giant knapweed, Yellow hardhead)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This clumping, robust perennial has unusual ramrod-stiff flower stems that bloom from early summer through late summer. Its fat, rusty buds open into large, deep yellow thistle flowers the size of a small fist. Easy to cut and dry for arrangements. This plant has big, coarse leaves that call for strong companions.

Centaurea montana ‘Amethyst in Snow’ Centaurea montana ‘Amethyst in Snow’
(Mountain bluet)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The blooms of this familiar perennial are not the standard blue; instead, they’re a striking silky white with royal purple centers. The flowers appear in late spring, then leave behind a mass of vigorous silvery green foliage.

no image available Centranthus ruber
(Red valerian, Jupiter's beard, Keys of heaven)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This clump-forming perennial has deep to mid-green leaves and dense clusters of small white, pale rose-pink, or dark crimson flowers in long, slender stems. It blooms from late spring to late summer.

Cephalanthus occidentalis Cephalanthus occidentalis
(Buttonbush, Button willow, Honey balls)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A native small tree found in wetlands from Minnesota to Florida and from New England to California, buttonbush can reach 8 to 15 feet tall and is often wider than it is tall. Prune it into a small multi-trunked tree to reveal the curly bark of its young stems and the punctuated pale spots of its older stems. Blooms are extremely rich in nectar and attract butterflies and other insects.

Cephalotaxus harringtonia 'Korean Gold' Cephalotaxus harringtonia 'Korean Gold'
(Plum yew)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This slow-growing dwarf conifer has a wide, rounded crown and narrowly furrowed, partially peeling bark. Three-inch-long needles emerge tipped in gold before aging to green in winter.

Cerastium tomentosum Cerastium tomentosum
(Snow-in-summer)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Snow-in-summer is great for rock gardens and dry areas, and also works well as a container plant. Plant it on a stone wall for a cascading effect. Snow-in-summer needs room to perform. A single plant can carpet an area as wide as a yard across. After the flowers fade, the silver/grey foliage shines on in contrast to more predictable shades of green.

Ceratostigma plumbaginoides Ceratostigma plumbaginoides
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This lovely herbaceous species is versatile and undemanding. It is the star of the late-summer garden with its spiky bright red flower buds and vivid blue flowers, displaying long-lasting mahogany red foliage in fall. Spreading slowly via underground runners, this long-lived plant makes a solid mat with erect, slender red stems and bright green leaves.

Ceratotheca triloba Ceratotheca triloba
(South African foxglove)
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A rare and graceful beauty, this plant is not a true foxglove, but its flowers are similarly shaped and hang in clusters. They come in shades of white and pink with pale violet stripes highlighting the inner throats. This plant’s soft coloring brings the delicacy typical of spring-blooming plants into the summer garden. The gray-green foliage has a distinctly nutty fragrance and is deer resistant. As a large-scale plant, South African foxglove holds its own when planted among shrubs and is best complemented by plants with deep purple foliage. It also makes a good cutting flower.

Cercidiphyllum japonicum f. pendulum Cercidiphyllum japonicum f. pendulum
(Weeping katsura)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This deciduous small tree initially has a pyramidal form, and later rounded. Cercis-like, opposite, heart-shaped blue-green leaves are borne on stiff, slender, pendulous branches that fan out from the crown and sweep the ground. Caramel-scented foliage emerges bronze or purple-red, turns blue-green, then fades to gold or apricot in autumn. Tiny red flowers emerge in late March or early April before the leaves.

Cercis canadensis 'Alba’ Cercis canadensis 'Alba’
(White redbud)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Small white flowers appear in profusion on leafless branches in early spring. Heart-shaped leaves emerge bronze, turning green, then yellow in autumn. Another white-flowered selection, 'Royal', has slightly larger blooms and more compact growth.

Cercis canadensis 'Forest Pansy' Cercis canadensis 'Forest Pansy'
(Eastern redbud)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In early spring, 'Forest Pansy' awakens with a long-lasting profusion of bright purplish-pink blooms borne in clusters, before the leaves, along smooth gray branches. Its heart-shaped, blood-red leaves are finely veined and glossy when young, slowly turning a dark, purple-tinged green in full sun. Autumn foliage is a bouquet of reds, purples, oranges, and yellows. The plant's graceful branching structure stands out in winter.

Cercis canadensis and cvs. Cercis canadensis and cvs.
(Eastern redbud)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Bright purplish-pink blooms are borne in clusters, before the leaves, along smooth gray branches. Heart-shaped leaves emerge bronze, turning green, then yellow in autumn. Cultivars are available with white ('Royal White') or pink flowers ('Tennessee Pink'), purple foliage ('Forest Pansy'), and weeping form ('Covey'). Grows 15 to 25 feet tall with a slightly wider spread.

Cercis canadensis Lavender Twist® Cercis canadensis Lavender Twist®
(Redbud)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This impressive tree, also known as 'Covey', takes the beautiful deep pink spring blossoms and attractive deciduous foliage of our native redbud and displays them on its weeping form. Lavender Twist® reaches 6 to 8 feet tall and 8 to 10 feet wide and makes a great specimen plant near walkways, foundation plantings, or patios.

Cerinthe major ‘Purpurascens’ Cerinthe major ‘Purpurascens’
(Blue shrimp plant)
(1 user review)

Though subtly colored, Cerinthe major ‘Purpurascens’ draws comment wherever it inserts itself. The steely purple bracts and leathery gray foliage of this annual seem extraterrestrial poking up among more conventional herbaceous plants. It is an annual from the Mediterranean region with leaves like a eucalyptus and flowers like a purple euphorbia. This plant produces large black seeds that drop to the ground in late summer and germinate in fall to start the cycle all over again if growing conditions are right.

Cestrum 'Orange Peel' Cestrum 'Orange Peel'
('Orange Peel' cestrum)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A wonderful hybrid derived from Cestrum diurnum and C. nocturnum, 'Orange Peel' is a veritable living bouquet of pure orange blossoms that, in warmer climates, begin with the first mild days in spring and last until the first hard frost. The tubular flowers have no fragrance during the day, but as soon as the sun sets, a sweet scent lingers in the air. In Zones 8 and warmer, 'Orange Peel' will be a deciduous shrub 6 feet tall and wide. In Zone 7, it will act as a die-back perennial and easily reach 3 to 5 feet tall and wide during the growing season. In colder zones, it makes an incredible summer-blooming annual.

Chaenomeles × superba ‘Texas Scarlet’ Chaenomeles × superba ‘Texas Scarlet’
(Flowering quince)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

One look at ‘Texas Scarlet’ flowering quince in bloom and most gardeners are instantly sold. Though the display only lasts a week or two in early spring, the sight of the tomato-red flowers is unforgettable. During the rest of the season, ‘Texas Scarlet’ remains a wave of glossy green leaves that reaches 2 to 3 feet tall in the toughest of conditions.

Chamaecrista fasciculata Chamaecrista fasciculata
(Partridge pea, Senna, Sleeping plant)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This colorful annual legume bears attractive yellow flowers that have reddish-purple spots at their base. The compound, feathery leaves look like those of sensitive plant. Fruit is contained in a pea pod, which adds additional garden interest and may attract birds.

Chamaecyparis lawsoniana 'Ellwoodii' Chamaecyparis lawsoniana 'Ellwoodii'
(Lawson false cypress)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant has a cypress-like, densely conical form with erect feathery branches of ovate blue-gray juvenile leaves. Oblong male cones emerge bluish black, opening brick red. Female cones are wrinkled and reddish brown, to one half-inch. A native of western North America, it is a very popular species since it is highly adaptable.

Chamaecyparis nootkatensis 'Pendula' Chamaecyparis nootkatensis 'Pendula'
(Nootka false cypress, Alaska cedar)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a conical tree with drooping branches and vertical, flattened sprays of bluish green to dark green foliage. This graceful cultivar has upward-curved branches with drooping branchlets and an open crown when mature. Male cones are ovoid, brownish green, and 1/8 inches long. Female cones are green, 1/2 inch long, with a recurved central hook on each scale, maturing in spring.

Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Aurea' Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Aurea'
(Hinoki cypress)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Hinoki cypress is a conical, evergreen, coniferous tree with leaves that are actually minute scales on tiny branches in the form of fans. The outer foliage of 'Aurea' is golden and the inner is green. Growth can be slow. Use as a specimen or use several as screening.

no image available Chamaecyparis thyoides ‘Heatherbun’
(White cedar, White false cypress, Heatherbun false cypress)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This evergreen, coniferous tree has flattened sprays of scale-like adult leaves. 'Heatherbun' has soft, blue-green juvenile foliage that turns plum to bronze in winter and a compact, rounded form.

Chasmanthium latifolium Chasmanthium latifolium
(Northern sea oats, Spangle grass, Wild oats)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Northern sea oats is a loosely tufted, clump-forming grass with lance-shaped, arching mid-green foliage that turns yellow in winter. Summer brings highly decorative oat-like panicles of flat, green flowerheads that shimmer and rustle in the wind, aging to bronze by late summer.

Chelone obliqua Chelone obliqua
(Turtlehead)
(4 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Turtlehead is an excellent, sturdy, vertical perennial with rounded stems, medium texture and deep-green, boldly veined leaves on short stalks. Weather-resistant flowers are dark pink or purple, borne in short, dense, terminal spikes. The flowers are tubular 2-lipped blooms, with a sparse yellow beard inside each lower lip.

Chilopsis linearis Chilopsis linearis
(Desert Willow)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Desert willow is shrub native to the Southwest U.S. and Mexico. Its erect willowy foliage is joined by large, blowsy pink flowers from early summer to first frost. This tough plants performs well in xeriscapes and other dry, unforgiving locations. It grows to 10 to 14 feet tall and wide remains blemish-free all season long.

Chionanthus retusus Chionanthus retusus
(Chinese fringetree)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species is grown for its billowy clusters of fragrant white blossoms, which appear in May or June. The erect clusters are more substantial than C. virginicus, and open at the same time as the leaves. Female specimens produce blue-black fruits in autumn.

Chionanthus virginicus Chionanthus virginicus
(White fringetree)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This North American native is unrivaled in beauty for its pendulous and diaphanous clusters of fragrant white blossoms, which appear in May or June. The individual blossoms are made up of four petals that dangle from threadlike stems in great silken clusters. The leaves are late to emerge in the spring, and this species flowers before leafing out. Female specimens produce blue-black fruits in autumn.

no image available Choisya ternata 'Sundance'
(Mexican orange blossom)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Sundance' Mexican orange blossom is an evergreen, compact shrub with white, fragrant flowers borne in late spring, and again in late summer and autumn. Groups of three little leaflets give the young yellow-green foliage a pleasing pattern, while the waxy, glossy texture adds a luminous quality.

Chrysanthemum morifolium Chrysanthemum morifolium
(Hardy garden mum)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

There would be few cut flowers blooming in October were it not for hardy garden mums. Their clusters of flowerheads show over a long period and are available in many colors, including red, orange, yellow, white, and lavender.

Chrysogonum virginianum var. australe Chrysogonum virginianum var. australe
(Goldenstar, Green-and-gold)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

From May to October, this perennial bears bright yellow, daisylike flowers on leafy stalks. It spreads by rooting runners to form an attractive groundcover that is easily controlled. This variety differs from the species in its more prostrate form and its more rapid spread.

Cissus discolor Cissus discolor
(Rex begonia vine)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Having the striking leaves of a Rex begonia and a vining growth habit, Cissus discolor is excellent in a container and can be trained onto a form. Its oval- to heart-shaped leaves are dark green with frosty silver patterns, while the undersides are red. The vine generally stays to 1 to 3 feet in containers. It may also be used on trellises or arbors.

Cistus albidus Cistus albidus
(Rock rose, Sun rose)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is an evergreen, bushy shrub native to southwestern Europe and North Africa. Rock roses are useful in a shrub border, on a hillside, or in containers. Cistus albidus bears vibrant lilac-pink flowers in summer. Although each flower lasts only one day, they are produced in great numbers on plants that are 3 feet tall and wide.

Cladrastis lutea Cladrastis lutea
(Yellowwood)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Yellowwood is a vase-shaped spreading tree with dark green foliage that turns a delicate yellow or orange in the fall and smooth light gray bark. Breathtaking, pendulous, foot-long, wisteria-like clusters of fragrant white flowers appear in late spring and early summer, often in alternate years.

no image available Claytonia virginica
(Spring beauty)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This low-growing, spring-blooming succulent touts 5-petaled, pale-pink striped flowers with strap-like foliage that continues to grow after bloom but disappears in late spring when the plants go into dormancy. It can literally carpet the ground in early spring, giving the impression of a light dusting of snow. Its flowers open when the sun is out and close when it is cloudy.

Clematis 'Blekitny Aniol' Clematis 'Blekitny Aniol'
(Blue Angel™ clematis)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

To look upon Blue Angel™ (‘Blekitny Aniol’) in full, glorious bloom is a heavenly sight indeed. A pale center and ruffled edges enhance the etherealness of its charming blue blossoms. Hundreds of flowers blanket its robust stems each summer, making it one of the most prolific bloomers I’ve ever seen. -Richard Hawke, Big blooming clematis, Fine Gardening issue #146, page 47

Clematis 'Ernest Markham' Clematis 'Ernest Markham'
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Ernest Markham' is a vigorous, late-flowering climber with abundant small flowers in summer. Blossoms are rich magenta, 4 inches across, with blunt-tipped sepals and light chocolate anthers.

Clematis 'Kakio' Clematis 'Kakio'
(Pink Champagne™ clematis)
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Pink Champagne™ (‘Kakio’) is one of the earliest large-flowered clematis to bloom. As the name implies, this variety boasts bubbly, bright pink tepals with pale centers and bright yellow stamens. Pink Champagne™ is a strong climber with a fairly narrow expanse, meaning it works well in tight spaces. I grow this variety alongside my garden gate in a cramped space that is less than a foot wide. The stems shoot straight up, making a beautiful pink exclamation point. -Richard Hawke, Big blooming clematis, Fine Gardening issue #146

Clematis 'Kiviruut' Clematis 'Kiviruut'
(Rüütel™ clematis)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

When I first saw the crimson flowers of Rüütel™ (‘Kiviruut’) in 2009, I was like a wide-eyed kid experiencing a Christmas miracle. It’s truly a luscious color. The 7-inch-wide flowers feature deeply grooved tepals with ruffled edges and similarly colored stamens, which give it a monochromatic look that I love. Rüütel™ blooms from late spring to midsummer on stems that only reach 6 feet tall, making it perfect for small patios where the luxuriant blossoms can be viewed up close. -Richard Hawke, Big blooming clematis, Fine Gardening issue #146

Clematis 'Evipo024' Clematis 'Evipo024'
(Clematis Picardy™)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A clematis doesn’t have to be big to be bold. Picardy™ (‘Evipo024’) epitomizes this rule; its compact habit certainly doesn’t restrain the boldness of the vivid, violet-red flowers. This is no shrinking violet! Picardy™ is free flowering and often reblooms into late summer. Topping out at 5 feet tall, its petite size is suitable for containers and for small patios where larger clematis would be overwhelming. -Richard Hawke, Big blooming clematis, Fine Gardening issue #146, page 47

 

Clematis 'Princess Diana' Clematis 'Princess Diana'
(Princess Diana clematis)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Princess Diana' is a steady bloomer from midsummer into early fall. Its compact habit makes it a good choice for large containers, but it will be just as happy in your perennial border.

 

Information provided by Brushwood Nursery


 

Clematis 'Cleminov 51' Clematis 'Cleminov 51'
(Sapphire Indigo ™ Clematis)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Sapphire Indigo is a non-climbing clematis that is covered in early summer with deep violet blooms that repeat bloom all summer long. -Star Roses

Clematis 'Teshio' Clematis 'Teshio'
('Teshio' clematis)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Double-flowered plants aren’t always my cup of tea; there’s something a bit fussy looking about them. But I make an exception for ‘Teshio’. Its spiky, double, lavender-blue flowers, stretching to 5 inches wide, are reminiscent of the venerable ‘Belle of Woking’ clematis, albeit darker. It’s fun to watch the spidery tepals unfurl—a bit haphazardly, at first, but eventually morphing into a pretty, well-structured blossom. ‘Teshio’ is a fairly strong bloomer from late spring to early summer, sometimes reblooming later in summer. It maintains a compact, bushy habit, reaching 7 feet tall, and is perfect for containers or patio plantings. Clematis is a great cut flower, and the spidery blossoms of ‘Teshio’ create quite a buzz in a floral arrangement. -Richard Hawke, Big blooming clematis, Fine Gardening #146, page 51

Clematis 'Viola' Clematis 'Viola'
('Viola' clematis)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

‘Viola’ is, in a word, sumptuous. The velvety, dark purple flowers are exceptional in their profusion and richness. This is a vigorous vine, reaching 10 feet tall, but climbs reasonably well without too much assistance (unlike some other large clematis varieties). Although we grew ‘Viola’ on a chain-link fence—ho hum—I always imagined its richly colored flowers more splendidly displayed against a silvery blue conifer or perhaps intertwined with a pearly white–flowered ‘Huldine’ or a rosy ‘Margot Koster’ clematis. -Richard Hawke, Big blooming clematis, Fine Gardening issue #146, page 50

Clematis ‘Nelly Moser’ Clematis ‘Nelly Moser’
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Nellie Moser' is easy to grow, producing large, flat flowers 6 to 8 inches in diameter with distinctive, gleaming lilac bars on each petal. This clematis blooms from May to late June, with a second, less profuse bloom in mid-August. Planted in a shady spot, the cheery pink-and-mauve-striped blossoms last for weeks instead of days.

Clematis alpina Clematis alpina
(Alpine clematis)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Alpine clematis is one of the earliest clematises to bloom, in early May. It bears relatively small but delightful nodding, bell-shaped flowers, 1 to 1.5 inches in diameter, in a great variety of colors.

Clematis crispa Clematis crispa
(Marsh clematis, Blue jasmine, Curly clematis)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A deciduous climber native to the southeastern United States, Clematis crispa bears lavender-blue, bell-shaped flowers with curly edges in summer. Its blooms are not profuse, but their elegant shape makes this plant a good choice for trellises, growing through shrubs, or planting in damp areas. The flowers are slightly fragrant and are followed by attractive seedheads. It also makes an unusual cut flower.

Clematis integrifolia Clematis integrifolia
(Solitary clematis)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Clematis integrifolia is a herbaceous, woody-based, upright, non-climbing perennial with a dense and somewhat sprawling habit. It bears solitary, nodding, bell-shaped flowers with slightly twisted violet to blue sepals and creamy white anthers from May to July. Sporadic blooming sometimes occurs throughout the summer. Blossoms mature to attractive, feathery, silver-green, or silvery brown seed heads.

Clematis integrifolia Mongolian Bells™ Clematis integrifolia Mongolian Bells™
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Clematis integrifolia is no longer only blue. This selection produces progeny with pink, white, and lavender blooms from midspring until late summer. The flowers are followed by attractive seed heads in fall. It has a compact, herbaceous form and grows to just 10 to 14 inches tall.

Clematis macropetala Clematis macropetala
(Downy clematis)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Downy clematis is a hardy, deciduous early bloomer that can flourish in Zone 4. The species will climb to 10 feet with a little support, and it has bell-shaped, purple-blue, almost columbine-like flowers about 1 to 2 inches, sometimes up to 4 inches in diameter, that mature to fluffy, pinkish seed heads. Blooms appear in spring and early summer, sometimes followed by a second flush in late summer to early autumn

Clematis 'Kivso' Clematis 'Kivso'
(Pillu™ clematis)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Piilu™ (‘Kivso’), which translates as “little duckling,” has pretty bicolored flowers with pale purplish pink margins and deep pink central bars. I’m particularly impressed by its prodigious flower production—it’s one of the most floriferous clematis I’ve ever grown. The open-faced flowers, 3 to 4 inches wide, are produced from early to late summer and are nicely distributed over the entire plant. The early flowers are supposedly semi-double, but I’ve only seen single flowers on our plants. This is a strong climber, reaching 6 feet tall with a narrow but full habit. For pruning purposes, Piilu™ blooms on old wood, so it can be lumped into group 1 or 2. This also means that it will flower earlier if there is no winter injury to the stems. -Richard Hawke, Big blooming clematis, Fine Gardening #146, page 51

Clematis tangutica 'Golden Tiara' Clematis tangutica 'Golden Tiara'
(Russian virgin's bower)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Golden Tiara' is a vigorous, late-flowering climbing vine to 15 or 20 feet tall with intense golden-yellow, bell-shaped flowers that eventually fully open to reveal crimson filaments. It blooms profusely from midsummer to late fall. The seedheads are fluffy and attractive in their own right. Native to western China.

Clematis terniflora Clematis terniflora
(Sweet autumn clematis)
(7 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This deciduous, late-flowering twining vine with deep green leaves and profuse, fragrant white flowers is easy to grow and will thrive and bloom in shade. Star-shaped blossoms are 1 inch across, appearing from late August to October and maturing to attractive, plume-like seed heads. The shiny green foliage is leathery.

Clematis texensis 'Duchess of Albany' Clematis texensis 'Duchess of Albany'
(Scarlet clematis, Leather flower, Texas clematis)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This vigorous climber can easily cover a support of 8 to 10 feet tall once established. Finely textured, dense light-green foliage makes an excellent foil for dainty, pink and carmine teardrop-shaped flowers 2 inches across. Blooms appear in early August and continue well into autumn.

no image available Clematis viticella 'Alba Luxurians'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Alba Luxurians' is a very tough, late-flowering climber with small flowers that open from midsummer to late autumn. White blossoms are sometimes faintly tinged with mauve when young, and are open, bell-shaped, single, and 2 to 3 inches across. Foliage is slightly gray-green.

Cleome Cleome
(Spider flower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Umbels of pink, white, or fuchsia blossoms make spider flower a beloved addition in any border. It's reseeding habit can be a boon or curse, depending on how you like your plants to behave.

Clerodendrum trichotomum Clerodendrum trichotomum
(Harlequin glorybower)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This large shrub offers a late-summer display of jasmine-like white flowers encased in red tepals and scent. Bright blue berries in autumn are accented by conspicuous bright, pinkish-red calyxes.

Clethra acuminata Clethra acuminata
(Cinnamon clethra)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Larger in all respects than common sweet pepperbush (Clethra alnifolia), this sizable shrub or small understory tree grows 8 to 12 feet tall and wide. In early summer, long, slender racemes composed of small ivory flowers appear, then give way to peppercorn-shaped seed capsules that swoop out from the branch tips in fall. About the same time, lance-shaped leaves become a glowing golden yellow before falling to reveal the reddish brown bark. The bark peels in small, irregular patches in the fashion of sycamores (Plantus occidentalis) to expose a dusty gray under-bark. Cinnamon clethra is a good choice for a woodland garden, where the tiered branches and elegant stems look captivating against new fallen snow.

Clethra alnifolia 'Hummingbird' Clethra alnifolia 'Hummingbird'
(Sweet pepperbush)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This upright, suckering shrub bears creamy white, deliciously spicy clove-scented flowers in dense, upright spikes that last four to six weeks in July and August. It is more compact than the species. Flowers mature to spikes of dark brown capsules that provide winter interest. Its oval, glossy dark green leaves turn a pleasant yellow in autumn.

no image available Clethra alnifolia 'Pink Spire'
(Summersweet, Sweet Pepperbush)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Very fragrant, light pink bottlebrush flowers grace this native shrub in late summer and early fall, attracting butterflies and other insects and perfuming the garden for weeks. Plant it in beds or borders, in a woodland or shade garden, or at waterside. It also has nice fall color.

Clethra alnifolia 'Ruby Spice' Clethra alnifolia 'Ruby Spice'
(summersweet, sweet pepperbush)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This summersweet is a sport of C. alnifolia 'Pink Spires'. Its fragrant, bottlebrush flowers are a darker pink; they attract butterflies, bees, and other insects in late summer and early fall. 'Ruby Spice' grows to about 4 to 6 feet tall and almost as wide, making this shrub suitable for a bed or border, a woodland or shade garden, or a waterside planting. Its yellow fall color extends the season of interest.

Colchicum 'Waterlily' Colchicum 'Waterlily'
(Autumn crocus, Meadow saffron)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Semi-erect, narrowly ovate leaves 7-10 inches long appear in spring and disappear by summer, followed by large, fully double, rosy lilac flowers resembling the blooms of a waterlily.

Colchicum autumnale Colchicum autumnale
(Meadow saffron)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Meadow saffron is a cormous perennial with erect, lance-shaped leaves 5 to 14 inches long. It bears 1 to 6 goblet-shaped, lavender-pink flowers in fall.

Colchicum speciosum Colchicum speciosum
(Autumn crocus, Meadow saffron)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This vigorous cormous perennial has semi-erect, lance-shaped leaves 7 to 10 inches long that emerge in spring, then go dormant in late May. In September, it bears 1 to 3 leafless, goblet-shaped, intense pink flowers with yellow anthers and often white throats.

Colocasia affinis var. jenningsii Colocasia affinis var. jenningsii
(Dwarf elephant's ear)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This little elephant ear has velvety dark leaves with prominent green veins and a large silvery central blotch. It reaches about 2 feet high.

Colocasia esculenta Colocasia esculenta
(Taro)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A large, showy, marginal aquatic plant with heart-shaped, dark green leaves, taro can reach 5 feet tall and is often grown as a summer annual. Use it in a container or near water.

Colocasia esculenta 'Black Beauty' Colocasia esculenta 'Black Beauty'
('Black Beauty' elephant's ears)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

‘Black Beauty’ is my new favorite elephant’s ear. A mutation of ‘Illustris’, ‘Black Beauty’ is grown for its 2-foot-long, 1-foot-wide, dark purple leaves with green stems and green veins. Once established in my garden, this plant held onto its leaves through the heat and drought of summer in full sun, which is unusual for the dark-foliage forms of elephant’s ears: They tend to look less than lovely when temperatures rise above 90°F.
-Adrienne Roethling, Elephant's Ears, Fine Gardening issue #148, page 61

Colocasia esculenta 'Black Magic' Colocasia esculenta 'Black Magic'
(Elephant ear, Cocoyam, Dasheen, Taro)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Rising to about 36 inches, the elephant ear's deep-purple stalks suspend luxurious leaves of the same color. When the leaves’ undersides are dusted with chalky-looking bloom, they have an intriguing, almost gray look. This plant does well in a bog or even in the margins of a water garden, as well as in average garden soil.

Colocasia esculenta 'Coffee Cups' Colocasia esculenta 'Coffee Cups'
('Coffee Cups' elephant's ear)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Coffee Cups' is an unusual and relatively recent introduction. It has nearly black stems and  cup-shaped leaves. 'Coffee Cups' is a vigorous grower, and, with a height of 6 feet, it's a good choice for the back part of a border. -Andy Cabe, Regional Picks: Southeast, Fine Gardening issue #120

Colocasia esculenta 'Diamond Head' Colocasia esculenta 'Diamond Head'
('Diamond Head' elephant's ear)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

When breeder John Cho combined a black Colocasia and a glossy Colocasia, he created something shiny and new: ‘Diamond Head’. It is named after the volcanic cone on the Hawaiian island of Oahu, which makes sense because both the cone and plant are black and lustrous. The plant’s leaves reach at least 16 inches long and 1 foot wide. ‘Diamond Head’ performs best along the edge of a pond or submerged in a water feature. If left in dry conditions, its leaf edges burn. In shade, it loses luster and appears dark green instead of purple or black. That purple-black color is what makes ‘Diamond Head’ so special, so if the light conditions in your garden don’t suit it, you might want to choose another cultivar. -Adrienne Roethling, Elephant's Ears, Fine Gardening issue #148, page 60

Colocasia esculenta 'Elena' Colocasia esculenta 'Elena'
('Elena' elephant's ear)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Bright green leaves add light and impact any place 'Elena' sets its roots.

Colocasia esculenta 'Fontanesii' Colocasia esculenta 'Fontanesii'
(Black stem elephant's ear)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This chic, black-stemmed elephant’s ear packs looks great in containers, beds, and borders. It also makes a wild addition to floral arrangements.

Colocasia esculenta 'Heart of the Jungle' Colocasia esculenta 'Heart of the Jungle'
('Heart of the Jungle' elephant's ear)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A demure egg-shell finish and a dark purple underpinning make the foliage of 'Heart of the Jungle' special.

Colocasia esculenta 'Hilo Bay' Colocasia esculenta 'Hilo Bay'
('Hilo Bay' elephant's ear)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The foliage of ‘Hilo Bay’ looks almost like crinkled taffeta hanging off black stems. Planted en masse, this selection makes an elegant yet whimsical statement.

Colocasia esculenta 'Illustris' Colocasia esculenta 'Illustris'
('Illustris' elephant's ear, Imperial taro)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The heart-shaped leaves of 'Illustris' are huge, and their dark highlights are stunning. This elephant ear is a lover of moist shade, but does best with a little dappled sunlight. It will tolerate boggy conditions. -Julia Jones, Fine Gardening issue #120

Colocasia esculenta 'Mojito' Colocasia esculenta 'Mojito'
('Mojito' elephant's ear)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

You must grow this plant—if only to be able to tell everyone that you have a mojito waiting for them in the garden. Its green leaves are set off by dark flecks and purple stems. The speckled patterns, splotches, and streaks vary from leaf to leaf, so no two ever look quite the same. ‘Mojito’ makes a thrilling addition to perennial beds, where its exotic form and color will add more surprise and interest than any other shrub or perennial you might have considered putting in its place. -Adrienne Roethling, Elephant's Ears, Fine Gardening issue #148, page 58

Colocasia esculenta 'Rhubarb' Colocasia esculenta 'Rhubarb'
('Rhubarb' elephant's ear)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Kitchen garden rhubarb doesn't hold a candle to 'Rhubarb' elephant's ear, at least not in an ornamental sense.

Colocasia esculenta 'Tiger Stripe' Colocasia esculenta 'Tiger Stripe'
('Tiger Stripe' elephant's ear)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This purple-and-cream-streaked elephant's ear makes a splash in any combination imaginable.

Colocasia esculenta ‘Thailand Giant’ Colocasia esculenta ‘Thailand Giant’
(‘Thailand Giant’ elephant's ears)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

‘Thailand Giant’ is, undoubtedly, the plant with the largest foliage in the aroid (Araceae) family. It started appearing in gardens across the country within the last decade. Leaves emerge in mid- to late spring, reaching more than 6 feet long and 3 feet wide in one season under optimal conditions. I’ve been digging out and overwintering a plant for three years now, but this past spring, I found a bud that had been left behind and survived winter; it grew a whopping 8 feet tall and wide in its first year in my Zone 7 garden on the south side of a brick wall that reflects heat and winter sun. Children and silly adults love to compare their ears to those of ‘Thailand Giant’.-Adrienne Roethling, Elephant's Ears, Fine Gardening issue #148, page 57

Consolida ajacis Consolida ajacis
(Larkspur)
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Feathery, almost fern-like leaves are mid- to dark green. In summer, larkspur bears delphinium-like open to densely packed spikes to 24 inches tall of pink, white, or violet-blue double flowers.

Convallaria majalis Convallaria majalis
(Lily of the Valley, May bells)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Lily of the valley's bell-shaped, sweetly scented flowers bloom in early spring. It likes partial to full shade and is perfect for a woodland garden. It may not be the best choice for your beds and borders because it tends to spread, but it is a perfect ground cover if you have a large shady spot under some trees.

no image available Convolvulus mauritanicus
(Ground morning glory)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Ground morning glory is a trailing low grower with a profusion of funnel-shaped lavender flowers from summer to early autumn.

Cordia parvifolia Cordia parvifolia
(Littleleaf cordia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Though its leaves are small, this semi-deciduous shrub stands out in the landscape. Littleleaf cordia has a prolifically branching, slightly open form that looks good year-round. Its roughly textured, dark gray-green foliage contrasts nicely with its coppery brown young stems. From late spring into fall, branch tips bear clusters of pristine, white, funnel-shaped flowers to provide a visually cooling effect during the peak of summer heat. It grows to 6 to 8 feet tall and wide.

Cordyline hybrida var. JURred 'Festival™ Burgundy' Cordyline hybrida var. JURred 'Festival™ Burgundy'
(Festival™ Burgundy corydaline)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This basal branching cordyline combines the rugged easy-care attributes of its cordyline cousins with an unusual mix of shiny dark color, compact bushy form, short stems and cascading grass-like leaves.

Cordyline australis 'Purple Tower' Cordyline australis 'Purple Tower'
(Giant dracaena, New Zealand cabbage palm)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Purple Tower' is a cultivar of the New Zealand native cabbage tree, frequently grown in greenhouses, as houseplants, or as large accent plants outdoors. It is hardy to Zone 10. The narrow, plum-purple leaves reach 3 feet long. The fragrant white flowers are small, but they are borne in large panicles in spring and early summer on mature plants. Plants grown in containers only rarely flower, however. Young plants are often sold as houseplants. Mature specimens have thick trunks with foliage at the top, resembling a palm tree. They are striking container specimens and can be plugged into a summer border. The species has naturalized in portions of California and the southern U.S.

Coreopsis auriculata Coreopsis auriculata
(Eared coreopsis)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Large golden-yellow blossoms are borne in late spring and midsummer on top of stems reaching almost 3 feet high. Native to the southeastern U.S.

no image available Coreopsis grandiflora
(Large-flowered tickseed)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

As the name implies, this species bears large, daisy-like blossoms (2.5 inches across) of golden yellow rays and darker yellow centers. It blooms from late spring to late summer and is native to the central and southeastern U.S.

Coreopsis grandiflora 'Baby Sun' Coreopsis grandiflora 'Baby Sun'
(Tickseed)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A multitude of 2-inch, golden-yellow daisy flowers sits atop thready foliage from late spring to late summer if deadheaded promptly. This clump-forming perennial is native to the central and southeastern U.S. It is sometimes grown as an annual. It makes a beautiful cut flower, and its casual habit makes it valuable in cottage gardens, borders, containers, and meadows.

Coreopsis grandiflora 'Sunray' Coreopsis grandiflora 'Sunray'
(coreopsis, 'Sunray' tickseed)
(5 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Sunray' coreopsis has double to semi-double yellow flowers that begin blooming in late spring and continue throughout the summer. The species is native to the central and southeastern U.S. Flowers are good for cutting. Use in beds and borders or in containers.

Coreopsis hybrid 'Route 66' Coreopsis hybrid 'Route 66'
(Threadleaf coreopsis)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Route 66' features big, bold, bicolor blooms. A rich ring of burgundy surrounding the flower center bleeds out to the very tips of the yellow petals. Narrow, deep-green foliage forms vigorous, uniform clumps.

Coreopsis lanceolata Coreopsis lanceolata
(Lance-leaved coreopsis)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Solitary yellow petals with toothed edges and flat, yellow centers open from early to late summer. Native to the central and southern U.S.

Coreopsis rosea Coreopsis rosea
(Tickseed)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant bears a profusion of lavender-pink flowers with yellow centers from mid-summer to early autumn. This perennial has finely textured leaves that give it an airy appearance.

Coreopsis rosea 'Mercury Rising' Coreopsis rosea 'Mercury Rising'
('Mercury Rising' coreopsis)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Large, velvety-red blooms bring long-lasting, dramatic color to the garden from early summer into fall. This easy-to-grow beauty is deer resistant and perfect cut for summer bouquets! -American Meadows

Coreopsis rosea 'Sweet Dreams' Coreopsis rosea 'Sweet Dreams'
(Tickseed)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The bicolored, white-tipped and raspberry-centered blooms are large (1 to 1.5 inches across) and long lasting. Flowers cover the mound of grassy foliage for weeks in summer and early fall. This hybrid does not produce seed.

Coreopsis verticillata ‘Moonbeam’ Coreopsis verticillata ‘Moonbeam’
(Thread-leaved tickseed)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Moonbeam' produces star-like blossoms of pale yellow from late spring into autumn. This cultivar is widely used because the refreshing tint of yellow compliments so many colors. The finely textured foliage adds interest all season long.

Corepsis verticillata ‘Zagreb' Corepsis verticillata ‘Zagreb'
(Thread-leaved tickseed)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Zagreb' produces star-like blossoms in egg-yolk yellow in early summer on plants 12 inches tall and wide. The sturdy, upright stems and finely textured foliage add delicate texture to the garden.

Cornus alba 'Elegantissima' Cornus alba 'Elegantissima'
(Redtwig dogwood, Cream-edge tatarian dogwood)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This vigorous deciduous shrub provides a long season of interest in the garden with its variegated leaves, attractive berries, pretty fall color, and red winter stems.

no image available Cornus alba
(Redtwig dogwood)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

These showy shrubs have two distinct phases of garden interest. In winter, they display boldly colorful bark—red, yellow, or orange—on twiggy stems to make a striking scene. In spring, the stems lose their vivid color and produce bright green, gold, or variegated foliage that accents the garden through the fall. Twig and leaf color vary according to the cultivar.

Cornus alternifolia Cornus alternifolia
(Pagoda dogwood, Green osier)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant owes its name to its distinctive layered branches, which resemble the tiered, spreading roofline of an elaborate pagoda. Pagoda dogwoods are especially striking when accented by masses of small, fragrant creamy white flowers in early summer. Small, round fruits ripen to a deep blue-purple in late summer.

no image available Cornus canadensis
(Creeping dogwood, Bunchberry, Dwarf cornel)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A spreading subshrub, Cornus canadensis has whorls of leathery mid-green leaves that turn purple in the winter. Green and white, sometimes pink-flushed flowers emerge in late spring and early summer, followed by clusters of scarlet berries.

Cornus controversa 'Variegata' Cornus controversa 'Variegata'
(Giant dogwood)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This rounded, deciduous tree with spreading, tiered branches is especially dramatic in the landscape. Its branches stand out in winter while the leaves, edged in a bold creamy white, add superb color and texture to the garden. In early summer, single white flowers are borne in large, flattened clusters up to 7 inches across. Blue-black fruit follows in autumn, attracting birds.

no image available Cornus drummondii
(Roughleaf dogwood)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This dogwood can be classified as either a deciduous shrub or small tree. Appealing creamy white flowers appear in late spring and become attractive clusters of milky white fruit in fall. The first cold front often turns the leaves a dark burgundy, and the winter stem tips have a glossy mahogany hue.

Cornus florida Cornus florida
(Flowering dogwood)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This native flowering tree is best known for its early spring blossoms, which are actually yellowish green flowers clustered in the center of four showy, white to pink bracts 1-1/2 to 2 inches long. Clusters of four bright red fruits mature in early fall, often persisting into the beginning of winter. 

Cornus kousa Cornus kousa
(Kousa dogwood)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A native of Korea and Japan, Kousa dogwood makes an excellent landscape tree and offers a long season of interest. Beginning in early summer, white bracts in sets of four (sometimes with pink tinges) surround tiny green flowers. These are followed by reddish fruit that resembles raspberries and attracts birds. Autumn color is a deep reddish purple. This species is resistant to dogwood anthracnose and has good cold hardiness. Grow as a specimen plant or in a woodland setting. It can be grown as a tree or large, multi-stemmed shrub.

Cornus racemosa 'Emerald' Cornus racemosa 'Emerald'
(Snow Lace® gray dogwood)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This native shrub dogwood is more compact than the species with semiglossy, emerald green foliage and showy, white fruit. Purple fall leaf color and rosy pink pedicels make this gray dogwood a fine choice for the woodland edge. Its silvery gray bark in winter adds interest into another season. White flowers in the spring add to the list of what it offers. Plant this dogwood in the landscape where it will be seen in the fall and winter. It rarely suckers.

Correa 'Dusky Bells' Correa 'Dusky Bells'
(Australian fuchsia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This spreading ground cover flowers from fall into spring. Its tubular, dusky pink flowers attract hummingbirds, and its deep green leaves release a citrus scent when crushed. Tolerant of dry conditions, frost-hardy 'Dusky Bells' correa should be tip-pruned regularly to promote new growth and improve flowering. Healthy specimens can live up to 50 years or more.

no image available Cortaderia selloana
(Pampas grass)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This stunning grass has 1- to 3-foot-long, densely tufted plumes atop tall, upright stalks and arching mid-green leaves. Plumes come in white, cream, or beige-pink and appear in late summer.

Cortaderia selloana 'Gold Band' Cortaderia selloana 'Gold Band'
('Gold Band' pampas grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This clumping, drought-tolerant grass is one of the best pampas grasses you could grow. It has the showy, late-summer plumes common to this group, but they grow straight up, not willy-nilly like many other varieties; they eventually stand 4 to 6 feet above the foliage. Even better news is that this cultivar does not set seed, so it is noninvasive. The foliage features distinct golden edges, which, for a grass, usually menas that it loves shade or moisture. But 'Gold Band' tolerates heat and drought, making it great for large containers, and it can handle coastal conditions, too.

Cortaderia selloana ‘Pumila” Cortaderia selloana ‘Pumila”
(Pampas grass)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This dwarf cultivar has mid-green leaves and densely tufted plumes atop tall, upright stalks and arching mid-green leaves. Masses of silvery yellow plumes appear in late summer.

Corydalis ‘Blackberry Wine’ Corydalis ‘Blackberry Wine’
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Stunning, fragrant pinkish-purple flowers bloom in spring and then sporadically through fall. The ferny foliage can reach as high as 3 feet and looks great around hostas and other shade garden plants. 

Corydalis aurea Corydalis aurea
(Scrambled eggs)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In spring, this biennial produces small yellow flowers, which are carried tightly over finely divided, sea green leaves. It self-sows freely.

Corydalis cheilanthifolia Corydalis cheilanthifolia
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant's tapering, finely dissected leaves make it look like a fern relative. The bronzy tints of the emerging foliage add to this plant's beauty. It bears buttery yellow blossoms from spring to summer.

Corydalis curviflora var. rosthornii 'Heronswood Form' Corydalis curviflora var. rosthornii 'Heronswood Form'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This variety has fragrant, deep blue, cornucopia-shaped flowers carried tightly on red stems above 6-inch tall, blue-green foliage. It is considered one of the best blue forms for color and performance.

Corydalis elata Corydalis elata
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This fragrant, blue-flowered species is more vigorous and heat tolerant than the blue cultivars. It blooms from late spring to early summer, and its foliage persists throughout the season with adequate moisture.

no image available Corydalis flexuosa
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

From late spring to summer, this species produces clusters of brilliant blue flowers over ferny foliage. It is the parent of many of the rapidly expanding selection of choice blue cultivars.

Corydalis flexuosa 'Blue Panda' Corydalis flexuosa 'Blue Panda'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The first of the coveted blue corydalises to be introduced, it produces fragrant clusters of long-spurred, azure flowers on a compact plant. 

Corydalis flexuosa 'China Blue' Corydalis flexuosa 'China Blue'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the coveted blue corydalises. It produces whorled clusters of sky-blue flowers on 18-inch tall plants. 

Corydalis flexuosa 'Purple Leaf' Corydalis flexuosa 'Purple Leaf'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This choice corydalis produces fragrant clusters of periwinkle-blue flowers and ferny foliage infused with purple hues. It is similar to 'Blue Panda,' yet is slower to spread and blooms more reliably during the summer.

Corydalis linstowiana Corydalis linstowiana
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species produces copious purplish-blue flowers in spring and fall. It has light green ferny leaves with a mid-rib of silver.

Corydalis lutea Corydalis lutea
(Yellow corydalis)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species has bluntly spurred golden yellow flowers from late spring to early fall. Its pale green, glaucous leaves form compact, ferny mounds.

Corydalis ochroleuca Corydalis ochroleuca
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

From late spring and throughout the summer, creamy flowers cover a delicate mound of filigreed gray-green foliage.

Corydalis scouleri Corydalis scouleri
(Scouler's fumeroot)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species has tiers of lacy foliage that form broad clumps, 3 feet high by 3 feet wide. Its hot pink flowers bloom from May to July.

Corydalis solida Corydalis solida
(Fumewort)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species produces mauve-pink, purple, or white flower spikes in spring over deeply divided gray-green leaves that are barely 10 inches tall. 

Cosmos atrosanguineus Cosmos atrosanguineus
(Chocolate cosmos, Black cosmos)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A chocolate scented flower! Dark red-brown, sometimes almost black, velvety flowers on long, slender, reddish brown stems bloom from early summer to autumn. Chocolate cosmos is a tuberous-rooted, tender perennial native to Mexico that can be overwintered indoors where not hardy. Grow in a border or in containers where the flowers can be appreciated up close. They also make good cut flowers.

Cosmos bipinnatus 'Sea Shells' Cosmos bipinnatus 'Sea Shells'
(1 user review)

This unique annual produces quilled blossoms of hollow, tube-shaped petals that radiate from the center in shades of white, pink, or carmine red. The flowers, which bloom all summer long, sometimes have bicolored interior and exterior tubes. 

Cosmos bipinnatus 'Sensation Series' Cosmos bipinnatus 'Sensation Series'
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This series of annuals produces extra large, cup-shaped blossoms to 3-1/2 inches across in shades of white or pink all summer long. 

Cosmos bipinnatus 'Sonata Dwarf Mix' Cosmos bipinnatus 'Sonata Dwarf Mix'
(1 user review)

This series produces compact plants 1 foot tall and about as wide with large blossoms in pure white and many shades of pink. These season-long performers make fine edging plants.

Cosmos bipinnatus cvs. Cosmos bipinnatus cvs.
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Cosmos are branching annuals with ferny foliage and pink, crimson, or white flowers that work well in the back of a border. Although introduced in 1799, cosmos did not beome popular for the garden or as the subject of breeding efforts until the early 1900s. The rest is now history. The variety 'Sensation' won the All-American Selection Award of Merit in 1936 for its clear colors of pink and white, on early-blooming, 3- to 4-foot-tall plants. 'Purity' is the glistening white form of cosmos in the 'Sensation' series. 'Sea Shells' has quilled florets. The Sonata Series cultivars are dwarf plants only growing to about a foot or two tall.

Cosmos sulfureus 'Cosmic Red' Cosmos sulfureus 'Cosmic Red'
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The intense scarlet red blooms and yellow centers of this bedding plant will stop you in your tracks. ‘Cosmic Red’ blooms all summer and looks great at the front of the border and in containers. As with other cosmos cultivars, grow this plant in full sun and moist, well-drained soil. The already hypnotic color will intensify as light levels increase.

Cotinus 'Grace' Cotinus 'Grace'
('Grace' smoke tree)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This cross of the European smoke bush (C. coggygria) and the American smoke tree (C. obovatus) is a gem in the garden thanks to its multiseason interest. Its iridescent spring foliage is green overlaid with red; then its large pink clouds of blooms in summer are followed by brilliant autumn foliage that ranges from red to orange. 'Grace' combines well with just about anything; asters, ornamental grasses, and Japanese maples are good places to start.

Cotinus coggygria Cotinus coggygria
(Smoke tree, Venetian sumac)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This bushy shrub or small tree has generated many notable cultivars, all of which add great textural qualities to the landscape. It has 6-inch-long frothy plumes that appear after the flowers and give a long-lasting, smoky haze to branch tips. Its green leaves are smooth and rounded and produce brilliant fall color.

Cotinus coggygria 'Ancot' Cotinus coggygria 'Ancot'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This specimen is grown for its stunning golden leaves, which turn to brilliant shades of orange and red in autumn. It may or may not produce the smoke-like plumes typical of the genus. 

Cotinus coggygria ‘Royal Purple’ Cotinus coggygria ‘Royal Purple’
(Smoke tree, Venetian sumac)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This shrub or small tree has stunning dark red-purple foliage that turns scarlet in autumn. It has plume-like seed clusters, which appear after the flowers and give a long-lasting, smoky haze to branch tips.

Cotinus coggygria ‘Velvet Cloak' Cotinus coggygria ‘Velvet Cloak'
(Smoke tree, Venetian sumac)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This shrub or small tree has stunning deep purple foliage that turns orange-red in autumn. It has plume-like seed heads, which appear after the flowers and give a long-lasting, smoky haze to branch tips.

Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb’ Cotoneaster 'Tom Thumb’
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This compact, low-growing, and self-rooting deciduous shrub is useful as an underplanting or ground cover. Its shiny dense foliage turns a brilliant red in the fall and requires little or no pruning.

no image available Cotoneaster horizontalis
(Rockspray)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This deciduous shrub has a spreading habit and branches that form a herringbone pattern. Its glossy, dark green leaves turn red in autumn.White flowers tinged with pink appear in late spring and mature to bright red, round fruit.

Crambe cordifolia Crambe cordifolia
(Colewort)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species is notable in stature, forming a giant mound and producing a profusion of airy white flowers on tall stems in late spring to midsummer and then dying down in midsummer to late summer. Colewort can reach 8 feet high and about half as wide. Grow in a large border or open woodland.

Crinum 'Sangria' Crinum 'Sangria'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This purple-leaved hybrid has Crinum bulbispermum in its blood, so it is more cold hardy than many other purple-leaved crinums. In spring, 'Sangria' sends up 2-foot-long leaves (it will stay evergreen in frost-free climates). 'Sangria' crinum serves as a superb substitute for phormiums, though it is somewhat less upright. It is grown for its foliage alone or for its pink flowers, which appear in the spring. -Andy Cabe, Regional Picks: Southeast, Fine Gardening issue #120

Crocosmia 'Lucifer' Crocosmia 'Lucifer'
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Abundant eye-catching, brillliantly red, tubular flowers appear in midsummer atop bold, slightly arching, sparsely branched 3-foot-tall stems. Crocosmia's mid-green leaves are pleated and swordlike.

Crocosmia 'Star of the East' Crocosmia 'Star of the East'
('Star of the East' crocosmia )
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

To put it in perspective, ‘Star of the East’ crocosmia is as far removed from the well-known ‘Lucifer’ crocosmia as Lady Gaga is from an Appalachian clogger. ‘Star of East’ is a strong grower without being aggressive, starting the season off with attractive green leaves that are held verti­cally. The foliage remains upright and in good condition well into fall, which isn’t always the case with other cultivars. The flower stems are exceptionally sturdy, too, and they need to be because they bear some of the largest flowers of any crocosmia—nearly 4 inches in diameter.
In late summer, deep orange flower buds emerge like tubes of lipstick from protective bracts. The flowers open widely with a glowing, soft orange face highlighted by a pale center. A surprisingly long bloom period is a bonus, the blossoms perfectly mixing with the other hot colors of late summer and then seamlessly blending into the warm oranges and yellows of autumn.

Crocosmia × crocosmiiflora Crocosmia × crocosmiiflora
(Montbretia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Montbretia looks like a small gladiolus until it blooms in late summer, when abundant sprays of orange, gold, or yellow star-shaped flowers are held by gracefully thin, arching, zigzag stems rising from a cluster of pale green, sword-shaped leaves.

Crocus sativus Crocus sativus
(Saffron crocus)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The saffron crocus blooms in the autumn, producing 1 to 5 rich lilac flowers with dark purple veins, held wide open above inconspicuous foliage.

Crocus speciosus Crocus speciosus
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This autumn-flowering cormous perennial bears long-tubed flowers in shades of violet-blue with deeper blue veins and divided, bright orange styles.

Crocus vernus Crocus vernus
(Dutch crocus)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Dutch crocus is one of the hardiest, if not the hardiest, crocus species readily available to home gardeners. A true harbinger of spring, it can be planted in borders, rock gardens, and even lawns. After flowering, the foliage must be left intact until it withers, which may cause lawn-mower anxiety in some gardeners. Often sold as "mixed crocus," cultivars of this species are typically white, lilac, or purple and white striped.

no image available Cryptomeria japonica
(Japanese cedar)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a coniferous evergreen with year-round interest and a graceful shape. Young foliage emerges a pale shade of yellow in a herringbone pattern in the spring and is a striking contrast to the deeper green of the older needles by summer. Crinkled brown cones dangle daintily on the ends of the branches in autumn, followed by new developing cones gleaming like little lanterns through the winter.

no image available Cryptomeria japonica ‘Sekkan-sugi’
(Japanese cedar)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This conical evergreen offers year-round interest and a graceful shape, with branches that are more pendent than the species. Young foliage emerges a pale shade of yellow in a herringbone pattern in the spring and is a striking contrast to the deeper green of the older needles by summer. Crinkled brown cones dangle daintily on the ends of the branches in autumn, followed by new developing cones gleaming like little lanterns through the winter.

Cuphea llavea Flamenco Samba™ Cuphea llavea Flamenco Samba™
(Bat-faced cuphea)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This bold-colored cuphea is a compact, mounding subshrub covered with dark-centered, cherry red blooms centered with a deep purple throat and slightly ruffled petal edges. Flowers are larger than those of the species. This sun-loving plant can reach up to 3 feet in height and width.

Cuphea llavea Totally Tempted™ Cuphea llavea Totally Tempted™
(Totally Tempted™ cuphea)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Totally Tempted™ cuphea has nonstop, bright red summer flowers that don't need deadheading. It doesn't mind summer heat and has a more compact habit than most cultivars in this species, growing to just a foot tall and a little wider.

no image available Cuphea micropetala
(Cigar plant)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This tireless bloomer is best known for its small, tubular flowers, each colored in vivid orange hues and tipped with white, like the ash on a glowing cigar. Each plant creates a mass of slender branches with lance-shaped, mid-green leaves. At the tip of the branches are fireworks bursts of unusual cigarlike flowers, each 1-1/4 inches long and softly hairy. Though the flowers look orangey, they are actually colored red and shaded with green-yellow.

no image available Cyathea australis
(Australian tree fern, Rough tree fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Australian tree fern has dark green fronds that can reach 12 feet long. Its stem elongates into a trunk-like structure, giving the plant the appearance of a palm tree. Humidity is essential to growing this plant well. Use it as a specimen plant, in a container, or in a greenhouse.

Cyclamen hederifolium Cyclamen hederifolium
(Baby cyclamen)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A fine plant for fall, this cyclamen's frequently scented, mottled flowers emerge directly from the soil, followed by a carpet of patterned, mid- to dark green leaves attractively variegated with patterns in white or silver. It often blooms for up to two months. Each small pink or white flower has swept-back petals resembling a dove in flight, marked with maroon at the mouth. It makes a good foliage display all winter after the flowers have faded.

Cynara cardunculus Cynara cardunculus
(Cardoon)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Cardoon is an architectural splendor with bold texture, thanks to its large, prickly, almost dagger-shaped gray-green arching leaves and a statuesque, vase-shaped frame. It is topped with round, purple, thistlelike flowers in midsummer. Cardoon can reach up to 5 feet tall and 4 feet wide.

Cyperus papyrus King Tut® Cyperus papyrus King Tut®
(King Tut® papyrus)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This exotic-looking beauty has a fantastic bold form and strong appeal. Its pendulous leaves sit on tall, upright stems. King Tut® is a rapid grower that makes an impressive centerpiece in the landscape. It likes wet places like water gardens or waterside and is perfect for containers without drainage holes. This papyrus is easy to grow and untroubled by pests or diseases.

Cypripedium reginae Cypripedium reginae
(Showy lady's slipper)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This terrestrial orchid has 3 to 7 oval to lance-shaped leaves. Unusual flowers almost 4 inches long, with a rose-pink floral globe under a pair of twisted petals, are borne singly or in pairs on upright stems in summer.

no image available Cyrtomium falcatum
(Japanese holly fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Spreading, glossy, dark green fronds reach a length of 8 to 24 inches. This fern has holly-like pinnae and sori scattered over the underside of the pinnae.

Cyrtomium fortunei Cyrtomium fortunei
(Japanese holly fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Usually found in moist, rocky areas or woodland in central and eastern Asia, this evergreen fern is deciduous in colder climates. Fronds may be cut to the ground in spring if damaged by dry winter winds. The distinctive fronds make great accents among groundcovers, or in drifts with perennials, shrubs, and trees.

Cytisus scoparius Cytisus scoparius
(Scotch broom)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Scotch broom is an upright, deciduous shrub with slender, arching shoots. In late spring, it produces abundant yellow flowers in axillary clusters.

Dahlia 'Bashful' Dahlia 'Bashful'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Bashful' is a reliable and prolific bloomer. The blooms (purplish petals surrounding a golden center) have a velvety feel that draws bees and butterflies. As dahlias go, 'Bashful' is not a tall plant, so it's best to place it near the front of a bed. -Alastair Gunn, Dahlias that deliver, Fine Gardening issue #121

Dahlia 'Bed Head' Dahlia 'Bed Head'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Bed Head'  is a tall plant with 4-inch-wide salmon-colored blooms with an unusually tangled appearance. It flowers less abundantly than many other dahlias, but is striking nonetheless. 'Bed Head' is a lush grower that benefits from strong staking. Plant it at the back of the border, and show it off as a cut flower in a vase. -Alastair Gunn, Dahlias that deliver, Fine Gardening issue #121

Dahlia 'Bishop of Llandaff' Dahlia 'Bishop of Llandaff'
(Dahlia)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

With its deep purple-black leaves and brilliant summer blooms, 'Bishop of Llandaff' is a fine addition to the sunny bed or border. The 4- to 6-inch-round red-petaled flowers have deep purple and yellow centers, which are set off nicely by the plant's dark foliage. Use this long-stemmed cultivar in cut-flower arrangements. -Gerald Gibbens, Regional Picks: Northwest, Fine Gardening issue#120

Dahlia 'Bodacious' Dahlia 'Bodacious'
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Bodacious' lives up to its name, with brilliant color and blooms that are supersized in both height and diameter. Heavy-headed 'Bodacious' requires beefy stakes. The rich color and ruffled effect of the loosely arranged petals make it stunning as a cut flower. -Alastair Gunn, Dahlias that deliver, Fine Gardening issue #121

Dahlia 'David Howard' Dahlia 'David Howard'
(Dahlia)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'David Howard' is large and vigorous dahlia with fine color. Apricot blooms contrasts nicely with the dark foliage and with dark-colored companion plants. It pairs well both with hot colors such as red and orange and cool blues and purples. A tall grower, it requires staking and looks best in the middle or back of a border. Perhaps best of all, it blooms continually without deadheading. -Alastair Gunn, Dahlias that deliver, Fine Gardening issue #121

no image available Dahlia 'Figaro'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Figaro' is a dwarf "landscape" dahlia with semi-double flowers in shades of red, pink, orange, yellow, and white. It works well as bedding and in containers, and blooms from planting time until frost.  

Dahlia 'Fire Pot' Dahlia 'Fire Pot'
('Fire Pot' dahlia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Resembling a water lily, the spectacular pink and yellow blooms are perfect for fabulous summer bouquets! The bright blooms are butterfly-magnets and Fire Pot is extremely easy to grow both in the garden and in containers.
-American Meadows

Dahlia 'Gallery Art Deco' Dahlia 'Gallery Art Deco'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Gallery Art Deco' is a little taller than the other plants in the Gallery series. It grows to a height of 2 feet and bears 4- to 5-inch-wide peach/apricot blooms. Petals are outlined in burgundy. 'Gallery Art Deco' provides lots of large flowers for a long time, and it is a perfect choice for containers. -Alastair Gunn, Dahlias that deliver, Fine Gardening issue #121

Dahlia 'Hissy Fitz' Dahlia 'Hissy Fitz'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Hissy Fitz' isn't a fussy plant, in spite of its amusing name. Its prolific and strong clear yellow blossoms  look like pompoms, thanks to the small incisions at the tip of each petal. Of medium height, 'Hissy Fitz' is a sturdy grower and not hard to stake. It's a fine addition to the sunny border. -Alastair Gunn, Dahlias that deliver, Fine Gardening issue #121

Dahlia 'Honka' Dahlia 'Honka'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Honka' has a simple, cheerful charm. Its eight-petaled, star-shaped flowers are lightly scented (not many dahlias are fragrant). 'Honka' brings a subtle presence to the late-summer border. Sturdy stems support the flowers above the plant and look good in the front of the border alongside taller perennials with a backdrop of dark foliage. No staking is required. -Alastair Gunn, Dahlias that deliver, Fine Gardening issue #121

Dahlia 'Jersey Beauty' Dahlia 'Jersey Beauty'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The 20th century's most celebrated dahlia is 'Jersey Beauty'. This towering, 4- to 6-foot-tall 1920s classic will produce so many lively, true-pink, classic dahlia flowers that you can cut all you want and still have a great garden display. This selection is exceptionally vigorous and beautiful.

Dahlia 'Kaiser Wilhelm' Dahlia 'Kaiser Wilhelm'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Of the maybe 10,000 named dahlias introduced in the 1800s—when dahlias ranked right up there with roses in popularity—only three survive. One of them is 'Kaiser Wilhelm', introduced in 1892. Its 3-inch flowers have neatly curled petals of soft custard-yellow brushed with burgundy, and a green button eye just like that of an old rose. The plant can grow to 5 feet.

Dahlia 'Kidd's Climax' Dahlia 'Kidd's Climax'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The pink-and-cream dinner-plate-sized 'Kidd's Climax' of 1947 has 10-inch flowers atop 4-foot-tall plants.

Dahlia 'Myrtle's Folly' Dahlia 'Myrtle's Folly'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

If you like the combination of peach and pink, you'll love 'Myrtle's Folly', whose narrow, twisted petals of deep pink and light orange  mature to reveal a yellow center. Perhaps too ungainly to use as a border plant, 'Myrtle's Folly' will provide a reliable supply of flowers that look perfect in a vase. -Alastair Gunn, Dahlias that deliver, Fine Gardening issue #121

Dahlia 'Mystic Illusion' Dahlia 'Mystic Illusion'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This new dahlia has gorgeous, bright yellow blooms that pop against its rich, dark purple (nearly black) foliage. 'Mystic Illusion' is well branched and makes a strong statement in beds, borders, and containers.

Dahlia 'Pooh' Dahlia 'Pooh'
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A charming choice, 'Pooh' has orange-red petals with gold and lemon-colored petal-like sepals. Plant this dahlia toward the back in a border, where its small flowers on tall stalks will be sure to stand out. -Alastair Gunn, Dahlias that deliver, Fine Gardening issue #121

Dahlia 'Zorro' Dahlia 'Zorro'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

For a change of pace, 'Zorro' looks fantastic floating stemless in a bowl of water. The ruffled petals accentuate the dark red hue. Staking is a must to prevent the stems from flopping beneath the weight of its huge and heavy blooms. Pinch back the young shoots to promote branching and sturdier stalks. 'Zorro' consistently produces quality tubers for division and, as such, is the perfect cultivar to start (or sustain) a dahlia collection. -Alastair Gunn, Dahlias that deliver, Fine Gardening issue #121

Dalea frutescens Dalea frutescens
(Black dalea)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This low, mounding, Southwest native shrub up to 4 feet tall and 6 feet wide has feathery foliage that contributes fine texture to a garden. While evergreen in milder climates, in temperate climates it is deciduous. Its small, pealike purple flowers appear in late summer and continue into fall.

Dalea greggii Dalea greggii
(Trailing indigo bush)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Despite a soft, delicate appearance, trailing indigo bush is one of the toughest groundcovers around. The feathery, silvery green compound foliage makes the clusters of tiny, rosy purple flowers stand out at close range. The blooms, which occur most heavily in spring and summer, return sporadically the rest of the year. This plant is excellent for stabilizing soil on slopes because its stem nodes root wherever they come in contact with the ground.

Daphne × burkwoodii 'Briggs Moonlight' Daphne × burkwoodii 'Briggs Moonlight'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This stunning specimen has luminous, creamy-ivory leaves and narrow green margins. The pale pink flowers are secondary to the glamorous foliage, which can light up a shady border and create definitive contrast.

Daphne × burkwoodii 'Carol Mackie' Daphne × burkwoodii 'Carol Mackie'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This celebrated hybrid is notable for its green leaves with golden-yellow margins that fade to cream. Its deep-pink buds open to pale, pink-white blossoms in early spring and give off a sweet fragrance.

Daphne × transatlantica 'Summer Ice' Daphne × transatlantica 'Summer Ice'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This rounded shrub has leaves with white margins, and pale pink star-shaped flowers that bloom in the spring, fall, and sometimes in between.  The blossoms release an intoxicating fragrance. 

no image available Daphne × transatlantica 'Jim's Pride'
('Jim's Pride' daphne)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This small shrub to 3-4 feet tall and wide blooms from late spring to fall with a liberal sprinkling of small, white, highly fragrant flowers over grey-green leaves that form a fine-textured mound. This shrub is semi-evergreen. It will retain some of its leaves in winter, though in colder climates it may be completely deciduous.

no image available Daphne odora
(Winter daphne)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This evergreen species produces rose-purple buds that open to white and are intensely and exotically fragrant. The blooms (from mid-winter to early spring) are followed by red fruit and dark-green, glossy leaves.  

Daphne odora 'Marginata' Daphne odora 'Marginata'
(Winter daphne)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This winter daphne has yellow-margined leaves and rosy-pink flower buds that open to white. Fragrant flowers bloom in winter and early spring. Reaching 4 feet tall and wide, 'Marginata' is beautiful against a wall or near a patio or deck where its fragrance can be appreciated. Or grow in a shade garden where its variegated leaves really shine. Daphne odora is evergreen and has a rounded form. It is native to China and Japan.

Darmera peltata Darmera peltata
(Indian rhubarb, Umbrella plant)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Darmera's flower stalks emerge from the ground on naked stems in spring, and are followed by cupped, rounded but indented leaves up to 24 inches across. The foliage forms a lovely, vase-like clump, 4 feet tall and 3 feet wide. The flower clusters are composed of many 5-petaled, starry, pink or white florets with conspicuous stamens. This native of the western U.S. is found growing along woodland stream banks, and helps to add a tropical look to temperate gardens. Darmera makes a distinct and long-lasting foliage statement in moist conditions, and exhibits autumn color also. 

Datura metel Datura metel
(Downy thorn apple, Devil's trumpet, Horn of plenty)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Datura metel grows 3 to 4 feet tall with large dark green leaves that have a bad smell. However, the large trumpet-shaped flowers have a sweet fragrance that spreads throughout the garden in the morning and evening. Flowers may be single or double and range from white and yellow to pink and purple.

Davidia involucrata Davidia involucrata
(Dove tree, Ghost tree, Handkerchief tree)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a lovely species grown for its distinct pairs of 7-inch-long, assymetrical white bracts which hang from the branches in layers in late spring. Given room and maturity (seed-grown trees may not bloom for up to 20 years), this plant is notable in both form and flower.

no image available Deinanthe bifida
(Deinanthe)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This small perennial blooms in summer with cup-shaped, waxy flowers that have numerous yellow stamens. Use Deinanthe in a shade garden, a woodland, or a rock garden.

no image available Delosperma 'John Proffit'
(Ice plant)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Covering itself with glowing fuchsia daisy-like flowers with many narrow petals, 'John Proffit' makes a beautiful groundcover or container plant. The succulent foliage looks like it has small pieces of ice on it (hence the name "ice plant') and is evergreen in warmer climates. Growing to only a few inches tall, it can spread almost 2 feet wide. It blooms from late spring to early fall.  

Delosperma ‘Kelaidis’ Delosperma ‘Kelaidis’
(Mesa Verde® Ice Plant)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Mesa Verde® is a moderately-spreading ground cover with small, bright salmon pink flowers that bloom from midspring till late fall. It is tolerant of a wide variety of soil conditions, from poor or sandy to well-drained.

Delosperma cooperi Delosperma cooperi
(Ice plant)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Summer-long bloom and a tough constitution make the mat-forming ice plant a perfect groundcover. Two-inch magenta blossoms with white anthers are produced in midsummer and late summer.

Delphinium 'Bluebird' Delphinium 'Bluebird'
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Blue Bird' is a Pacific Hybrid delphinium grown as an annual or biennial. Its mid-blue flowers have white centers. The flowers are large but short-lived and bloom on tall stems from early summer to midsummer. Grow at the back of a border or in the middle of an island bed. There is nothing quite like delphiniums in the garden.

no image available Delphinium 'Delft Blue'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Belonging to the Belladonna Group hybrids, this delphinium bears loose, branched spikes of intense blue flowers with soft white edges. It may rebloom if deadheaded. The cultivar name pays homage to the resemblance of the flower color to Delft pottery.

Delphinium elatum Delphinium elatum
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The parent of the regal hybrid Delphiniums, the species has 3- to 4-foot-tall spires of blue, violet, lavender, or white flowers. It usually requires staking.

Dennstaedtia punctilobula Dennstaedtia punctilobula
(North American hay-scented fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This fern's lacy foliage smells of freshly mown grass and carpets the woodland or a moist, partially sunny site. The green lushness turns golden in the fall. It is a good choice for rapid naturalizing. Use in a woodland garden or near water features.

Deschampsia cespitosa 'Northern Lights' Deschampsia cespitosa 'Northern Lights'
(Tufted hair grass, Tussock grass)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A tuft of thin grassy foliage with gray and gold variegation distinguishes this cultivar. Early summer brings 3-foot-tall, airy plumes of tiny flowers that look beautiful when backlit by the sun. As fall approaches, the foliage turns golden with pink-coral tips. This grass even grows well in shadier sites. Plant in a border, woodland garden, or shaded rock garden.

Deutzia crenata var. nakaiana 'Nikko' Deutzia crenata var. nakaiana 'Nikko'
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This compact variety performs well as a groundcover and is an excellent choice for the mixed border or rock garden. 

Deutzia gracilis Deutzia gracilis
(Slender deutzia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This erect and bushy deutzia has masses of fragrant white flowers in upright clusters for weeks in spring and early summer.

Dianthus 'Bath's Pink' Dianthus 'Bath's Pink'
(Cheddar pink)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Dianthus 'Bath's Pink' is a stunning, wide-spreading ground cover with grassy, blue-green foliage and pink flowers. Use it to edge a bed or grow it in your rock garden for a splash of cool color. To keep its blooms going, be sure to deadhead.

Dianthus 'Neon Star' Dianthus 'Neon Star'
(Carnation, Pink)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This hybrid has a compact, mounding habit, with silvery-blue foliage and fluorescent pink toothed flowers, which continue blooming with deadheading.

Dianthus × allwoodii Dianthus × allwoodii
(Allwood hybrids)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

These modern hybrids bear salmon-pink blossoms ('Doris' has scarlet in the center) and bloom freely with moderate fragrance.

Dianthus alpinus Dianthus alpinus
(Alpine pink)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Clusters of serrated single blooms in pink to dark crimson sit just off the ground in summer.

Dianthus barbatus Dianthus barbatus
(Sweet William)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

These short-lived perennials or biennials are charming plants, and are worth their weight in gold in the cottage border. After flowering, the attractive foliage holds the space well.

Dianthus barbatus 'Summer Sundae' Dianthus barbatus 'Summer Sundae'
(Sweet William)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Summer Sundae' Sweet William is a nice mix of red, pink, and white flowers held in rounded groups at the tops of stems. Plants bloom from late spring to early summer. The flowers are lightly fragrant. Use in a cottage garden or border, or in containers. It flowers the first year from seed.

Dianthus chinensis ‘Ideal Crimson' Dianthus chinensis ‘Ideal Crimson'
(China pink, India pink)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Fringed flowers in shades of bright red with white centers open without fragrance in summer. 

Dianthus deltoides Dianthus deltoides
(Maiden pink)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This mat-forming species with dark green leaves is one of the easiest to grow.  Blossoms range from white to red and are usually single and without fragrance. Use as bedding or in rock gardens.

Dianthus deltoides 'Arctic Fire' Dianthus deltoides 'Arctic Fire'
(Maiden pink)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This mat-forming species with narrow, dark green leaves is one of the easiest to grow. Blossoms with red eyes open in early summer and may rebloom if sheared back after flowering.

Dianthus gratianopolitanus Dianthus gratianopolitanus
(Cheddar pink)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This compact species forms broad mats of blue-gray linear leaves and is perfect for a rock garden setting. The purplish-pink flowers are solitary, toothed, and deliciously fragrant. 

Dianthus gratianopolitanus 'Firewitch' Dianthus gratianopolitanus 'Firewitch'
(Cheddar pink)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Silvery-blue mats of evergreen, linear foliage. Well-known and loved for the showy, profuse, single, magenta blooms, spring-fall. 'Firewitch' exudes the spicy scent of cloves. Very hardy; good performer. Moderate to fast grower. Heat resistant and tolerant of humidity. Excellent for use in containers, as an edger, in rock gardens, scented gardens and the front of the border. If cut back, they often rebloom in early fall. Considered deer resistant once established. Attracts butterflies!  Very suitable for gardens in the South. -Santa Rosa Gardens

no image available Dianthus plumarius
(Modern border pink)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Especially fragrant and variable in color, modern border pinks form mats of grayish green leaves and fringed, saucer-shaped flowers.

Diascia barberae Diascia barberae
(Twinspur)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This softly textured tender perennial (or annual) produces delicate, loose spires in summer and fall. Diascia is at home spilling onto a walkway or filling in between more structured plants. 

Dicentra 'King of Hearts' Dicentra 'King of Hearts'
(Bleeding heart)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'King of Hearts' has bright rose-pink, heart-shaped flowers in clusters over blue-green parsley-like foliage. It offers the garden a long blooming season, plump flowers, and rich colors.

Dicentra eximia ‘Alba’ Dicentra eximia ‘Alba’
(Fringed bleeding heart, Turkey corn)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Rows of white flowers dangle above the fern-like foliage, opening in April and continuing intermittently until October.

Dicentra formosa Dicentra formosa
(Western bleeding heart)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Don't let its delicate appearance fool you: Western bleeding heart is hardy and tenacious. This elegant, herbaceous perennial spreads slowly from rhizomes to form drifts of soft blue-green, ferny foliage in shady woodland areas. Above the leaves in late spring, pink heart-shaped flowers hang gracefully from long, arched stems, attracting scores of hummingbirds but not the local deer. It is surprisingly drought tolerant during the summer months.

no image available Dicentra scandens 'Athens Yellow'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Bright yellow heart-shaped flowers bloom in April or May; bloom continues off and on throughout the season. This climbing perennial can reach 3 feet high and wide. The species is native to the Himalayas.

Dicentra spectabilis Dicentra spectabilis
(Bleeding heart, Lyre flower)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A garden favorite for many years, bleeding heart has soft green foliage and 1-inch-long rose pink and white heart-shaped flowers for several weeks in spring. Plants can form clumps 3 feet across and almost as tall. Foliage generally goes dormant in summer, so be sure to choose companion plants carefully so there isn't an empty space left in the garden. Beautiful in a border or woodland garden.

Dicentra spectabilis 'Gold Heart' Dicentra spectabilis 'Gold Heart'
(Bleeding heart, Lyre flower)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Golden yellow foliage emerges from the ground in early spring and is soon accompanied by rosy-pink broken hearts that open in succession for nearly a month as the stems elongate.

Dichondra argentea 'Silver Falls' Dichondra argentea 'Silver Falls'
(Kidney weed, Silver nickel vine, Silver pony's foot)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Long silvery stems, sometimes reaching 4 feet or more, bear silvery, small leaves. Use this striking plant as a groundcover or in containers.

Diervilla lonicera Diervilla lonicera
(Northern bush honeysuckle)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

While not a true honeysuckle (Lonicera spp. and cvs., USDA Hardiness Zones 3-10), Northern bush honeysuckle has honeysuckle-like yellow flowers and glossy green foliage on a native, deciduous shrub 3 to 4 feet tall and 3 to 5 feet wide. The flowers appear in early summer and last through summer, and the foliage occasionally exhibits bright red fall color.

Diervilla sessifolia 'LPDC Podaras' Diervilla sessifolia 'LPDC Podaras'
(Cool Splash™ bush honeysuckle)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A small shady nook is one of the hardest areas in which to design a garden. Whether it’s under a large tree or in a tiny bed alongside a sheltered patio, this area needs a dwarf shrub that magnetizes the senses in order to become a focal point. Although the go-to shrub for these situations is often a small rhododendron, Cool Splash™ bush honeysuckle is much more exciting.

 This deciduous shrub brightens up dark landscapes and stays compact. Although it can handle shade, it will also thrive in a sunny border. Summer clusters of perfumed, trumpet-shaped yellow blossoms sit atop creamy-white-and-pea-green leaves. You’ll often see butterflies and hummingbirds anywhere this shrub grows. And although I love wildlife, I get a kick out of seeing deer shrug and turn away from this plant. Dry shade and hard clay soil are conditions this shrub can handle. Cool Splash™ has an extensive root system, which makes it great for erosion control, too

Digitalis grandiflora Digitalis grandiflora
(Yellow foxglove)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Originating in mountainous woodland and stony habitats from Europe to western Asia, yellow foxglove is tolerant of dry shade but flourishes with moisture. Arising in midsummer from neat clumps of fine-toothed foliage, a mass of soft yellow open bells, speckled brown inside, blooms along one side of a 3-foot-tall stem. Usually described as a perennial, it is more accurate to call it a biennial or short-lived perennial. If the flowering stalk is cut down after blooms have faded, it may rebloom in the fall. When a few flower stalks are left, the plant self-seeds. 

Digitalis obscura Digitalis obscura
(Sunset foxglove, Willow-leaved foxglove)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This foxglove has long-lasting flowers in seductive shades of burnt umber. Its glossy, linear leaves are evergreen in mild climates, but turn brown in colder climates.

no image available Digitalis purpurea 'Pam's Choice'
(Common Foxglove)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a biennial or short-lived perennial, which may last longer and rebloom if deadheaded. It sports dramatic blossoms in contrasting colors in spires reaching six feet high in rich soil, but more likely to 3 or 4 feet. 

Diphylleia cymosa Diphylleia cymosa
(Umbrella leaf)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Wide and distinct umbrella-like leaves form beautiful clumps in a woodland setting. The small white flowers, which persist throughout the season, transform into striking umbels of blue-black berries on cerise stalks.

Disporum sessile 'Variegatum' Disporum sessile 'Variegatum'
(Variegated fairy bells)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This cultivar adds attractive white-striped foliage to shady areas, as well as pendent, white, bell-shaped flowers in late spring and early summer, and black berries in fall. The species is native to Japan. Variegated fairy bells grows to about 24 inches tall and wide.

Draba aizoides Draba aizoides
(Yellow whitlow grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Yellow whitlow grass is a small, semi-evergreen perennial perfect for growing in a trough, rock wall, or xeric bed. It grows to only 4 inches high and twice as wide. This delightful, drought-tolerant miniature has spiny rosettes of lustrous green leaves through the winter and cheerful yellow flowers in early spring.

Dryopteris × australis Dryopteris × australis
(Dixie wood fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This dramatic fern diplays 4-foot-tall arching fronds that form impressive clumps with age. It is a hybrid of two native ferns and makes a wonderful groundcover.

Dryopteris celsa Dryopteris celsa
(Log fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This fern is a tall plant with foliage that looks good all summer long. Upright deep-green fronds are semi-evergreen but topple over in fall. May reach 3 feet.

Dryopteris crassirhizoma Dryopteris crassirhizoma
(Wood fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a handsome and lush, semi-evergreen vase-shaped fern with thickly textured leaves that is suitable for specimen treatment. It reaches 3.5 feet tall. Grow in a woodland or moist shade garden.

Dryopteris erythrosora Dryopteris erythrosora
(Autumn fern, Pink shield fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In spring, autumn fern’s fronds unfurl a copper red, then turn to bronze, and finally become a shiny dark green. The fronds are upright and lend a lacy texture to the woodland garden. This fern is usually deciduous. -Lou Anella, Regional Picks: Southern Plains, Fine Gardening issue #127

Dryopteris tokyoensis Dryopteris tokyoensis
(Tokyo wood fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Tokyo wood fern's ladderlike, upright fronds provide a strong vertical accent to its surroundings. The vase-shaped clumps grow to 18 to 36 inches tall. Grow in a woodland or shade garden.

Duranta erecta Duranta erecta
(Golden dewdrop, Pigeon berry, Sky flower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This tropical shrub or small tree may be grown in a mixed or shrub border; in colder climates, it does well in a temperate greenhouse. Flowers in shades of sky-blue, lilac, purple, or white blossom gracefully along arching branches in summer; they are followed by spherical, yellow fruit.

Dyckia fosteriana 'Cherry Cola' Dyckia fosteriana 'Cherry Cola'
('Cherry Cola' dyckia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Cherry Cola' , a relatively new cultivar, features deep, dark burgundy foliage and small but sharp teeth (handle with care!). In summer, orange blossoms appear, and hummingbirds love them. Like other Dyckias, this plant tolerates extreme heat and is perfect for hot, dry locations. -Jeff Moore, Regional Picks: Southwest, Fine Gardening issue #120

Eccremocarpus scaber Eccremocarpus scaber
(Chilean glory flower, Chilean glory vine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This fast-growing, evergreen climber has sharply 4-angled stems and red-orange tubular flowers tipped with yellow that are borne in clusters 4 to 6 inches long. Chilean glory flower blooms from late spring to autumn. Light green leaves are small, ovate, and boldly veined.

Echinacea 'Art's Pride' Echinacea 'Art's Pride'
(Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This cross of E. purpurea 'Alba' and E. paradoxa bears narrow coppery-orange ray petals and prominent deep brown central cones. The fragrant blooms open from early to late summer with sporadic later bloom. It has semi-glossy leaves and grows 2 to 3 feet tall.

Echinacea 'Harvest Moon' Echinacea 'Harvest Moon'
(Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the exceptional Big Sky™ series (E. paradoxa crossed with E. purpurea), bearing fragrant, earthy-gold petals and golden orange central cones. These hybrids have all inherited the large green leaves, strong branching stems, wide flower petals, and profuse blooming tendencies of E. purpurea.

Echinacea 'Sundown' Echinacea 'Sundown'
(Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the exceptional Big Sky™ series (E. paradoxa crossed with E. purpurea), bearing fragrant, russet-orange petals and reddish-brown central cones. These hybrids have all inherited the large green leaves, strong branching stems, wide flower petals, and profuse blooming tendencies of E. purpurea.

Echinacea 'Sunrise' Echinacea 'Sunrise'
(Coneflower)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the exceptional Big Sky™ series (E. paradoxa crossed with E. purpurea), bearing fragrant, pale citron petals and green-maturing-to-copper central cones. These hybrids have all inherited the large green leaves, strong branching stems, wide flower petals, and profuse blooming tendencies of E. purpurea.

Echinacea 'Sunset' Echinacea 'Sunset'
(Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the exceptional Big Sky™ series (E. paradoxa crossed with E. purpurea), bearing fragrant, vibrant salmon-orange petals and brown central cones. These hybrids have all inherited the large green leaves, strong branching stems, wide flower petals, and profuse blooming tendencies of E. purpurea.

Echinacea 'Twilight' Echinacea 'Twilight'
(Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the exceptional Big Sky™ series (E. paradoxa crossed with E. purpurea), bearing fragrant rose-colored petals and stunning red central cones on 24-inch plants. These hybrids have all inherited the large green leaves, strong branching stems, wide flower petals, and profuse blooming tendencies of E. purpurea.

no image available Echinacea angustifolia
(Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This native meadow perennial has daisy-like blossoms in early summer. It bears copper-orange central cones surrounded by short, arching, ray petals in pink or purple-pink, and occasionally white.

Echinacea purpurea Echinacea purpurea
(Purple coneflower)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Because of its carefree performance, this native meadow perennial with daisy-like flowers appropriately inhabits the gardens of many. It blooms from midsummer into early autumn, with prominent, copper-orange central cones surrounded by rose-purple, ray petals (to 5 inches across).

Echinacea purpurea Echinacea purpurea
(Purple coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Create a field full of gorgeous pink blooms with easy-to-grow Echinacea seeds. Butterflies and Hummingbirds will flock to your property each summer and the multitude of blooms make for spectacular bouquets. -American Meadows

Echinacea purpurea 'Fragrant Angel' Echinacea purpurea 'Fragrant Angel'
('Fragrant Angel' coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Coneflowers have much to offer the garden, and now they have fragrance, too. 'Fragrant Angel' has large, sweetly scented flowers made up of two rows of white petals surrounding a greenish orange cone. The plants grow to 40 inches and attract butterflies. Grow them in a border, meadow, cottage garden, or cut flower garden.

Echinacea purpurea 'Kim's Knee High' Echinacea purpurea 'Kim's Knee High'
(Purple coneflower)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This native meadow derivative is a compact version of the species. It blooms from midsummer into early autumn, with prominent, copper-orange central cones surrounded by drooping, rose- or purple-pink ray petals. It will reach 24 inches if not cut back.

Echinacea purpurea 'Magnus' Echinacea purpurea 'Magnus'
(Purple coneflower)
(12 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This native meadow derivative has vibrant, daisy-like flowers that bloom from midsummer into early autumn. Its prominent, dark orange central cones are surrounded by larger (to 7 inches across) and more horizontal, reddish-pink, ray petals than the species.

Echinacea purpurea ‘Bright Star’ Echinacea purpurea ‘Bright Star’
(Purple coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This native meadow derivative with daisy-like flowers blooms from early summer into early autumn. 'Bright Star' has prominent, copper-orange central cones surrounded by red-purple ray petals (to 5 inches across), and grows to less than 3 feet tall.

Echinacea purpurea ‘White Swan' Echinacea purpurea ‘White Swan'
(White coneflower)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This cultivar of a native meadow coneflower has white, daisy-like flowers from early summer into early autumn. Its prominent, coppery-green, central cones are surrounded by large white ray petals that reach 4.5 inches long.

Echinacea tennesseensis 'Rocky Top' Echinacea tennesseensis 'Rocky Top'
(Tennessee coneflower)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The 'Rocky Top' hybrid offers the garden an abundance of pastel pink coneflowers with greenish-black cones on plants 2 to 3 feet tall and 1 foot wide. Interestingly, the flowers follow the sun like sunflowers and the petals sometimes curl upward slightly. Use this compact coneflower in borders, meadows, or as cut and dried flowers. E. tennesseensis was thought to be extinct in the 1960s, but was rediscovered and is now widely available as a garden plant.

Echinops ritro Echinops ritro
(Small globe thistle)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This compact species has cobweb-like, woolly foliage. The unique spherical flowerheads appear steely blue before maturing to a brighter blue. The late summer flowers add charm of form and texture to a mixed border.

Edgeworthia chrysantha Edgeworthia chrysantha
(Paper bush)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This small shrub from China is noteworthy for its spherical clusters of very fragrant yellow flowers that bloom in winter and early spring.

Elaeagnus pungens Elaeagnus pungens
(Thorny elaeagnus)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a tough evergreen shrub with pendent flowers that provide a delightful gardenia-like perfume during October and November. Brown fruit ripens to red in autumn. Handsome foliage is a lustrous green above, dull and silvery dotted with brown below.

Elaeagnus umbellata Elaeagnus umbellata
(Autumn olive)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Autumn olive is a vigorous, deciduous shrub with pale yellow-white bell-shaped flowers to a half-inch long borne in late spring and early summer. Its silvery fruit turns red in fall and attracts birds. Wavy-margined leaves are silvery when they emerge and mature to bright green above.

Elymus arenarius Elymus arenarius
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant has densely tufted, spreading clumps of strap-like, flowing foliage. Pale blue-gray leaves arch loosely. In summer, it produces stiff, upright, blue-gray spikes of flowers that turn buff.

Emilia coccinea Emilia coccinea
(Tassel flower, Flora's paintbrush)
(1 user review)

A captivating little plant for the front of the border, tassel flower produces small, scarlet-orange pompons which, when viewed from a distance, seem like they’re floating in air. The flowers cluster at the top of wiry stems that rise from a basal rosette of blue-green leaves. Plants occasionally self-sow when sited in a good location. With its small habit, tassel flower lends itself well to container gardens and fresh-cut flower arrangements, adding an element of whimsy. Its delicate and airy nature looks best with bold-leaved or showy plants in the background, creating a see-through effect. To magnify their magic, mass several plants together.

no image available Enkianthus campanulatus
(Redvein enkianthus)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This tree-like shrub bears pendent clusters of bell-shaped, creamy-white flowers with rose veins in late spring and early summer. In autumn, the foliage turns magnificent shades of orange and red.

Enkianthus perulatus Enkianthus perulatus
(White enkianthus)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is perhaps the most refined Enkianthus, bearing dainty, white pendulous bells in May. It forms an elegant, rounded shrub to 6 feet with gracefully tiered branches and produces brilliant scarlet color in autumn.

Ensete ventricosum 'Maurelii' Ensete ventricosum 'Maurelii'
(Red banana, Abyssinian banana, Ethiopian banana)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This banana-like perennial has large paddle-shaped leaves, which range in color from deep claret brown to red-purple to pale green, produced from the center of the plant, with thick midribs bright red beneath. White flowers are borne in inflorescences 3 to 4 feet long. Fruits are banana-like but dry and unpalatable.

Ephedra equisetina Ephedra equisetina
(Bluestem joint fir)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A member of the conifer clan, Ephedra equisetina is commonly called bluestem joint fir due to its finely textured blue stems. In spring, it features a conspicuous froth of yellow blooms that are often followed by red berries. It is perfect for naturalized areas since it reliably spreads.

Epimedium × rubrum Epimedium × rubrum
(Red epimedium, red barrenwort, bishop's hat)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Early in the season, the thin, heart-shaped leaves of this plant have a red tinge, which turns to bronze in fall. Plant red epimedium along a path, where its delicate foliage and tiny spring flowers can be admired. -Marty Hair, Regional Picks: Upper Midwest, Fine Gardening issue #127

Epimedium grandiflorum cvs. Epimedium grandiflorum cvs.
(Longspur barrenwort, Bishop's hat)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Longspur barrenwort is a clump-forming, deciduous, rhizomatous perennial. Leaves, light green and flushed bronze when young, are heart-shaped with spiny margins. Four-petaled white, yellow, pink, or purple flowers, hanging in clusters, appear in mid- and late spring.

Eragrostis chloromelas Eragrostis chloromelas
(Boer love grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

From late spring until fall, Boer love grass puts on a glorious display as inflorescences that emerge silver and dry to gold dance up to 2 feet above the fine-textured clump of foliage. The show is shorter in humid climates.

Eremurus robustus Eremurus robustus
(Foxtail lily, Desert candle)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species produces very tall spires of pale pink flowers with yellow stamens atop leafless stems that puncture vertical space with unmatched elegance.

Erigeron karvinskianus Erigeron karvinskianus
(Fleabane)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Profusion' fleabane is a carpeting, rhizomatous, woody-based perennial with lax, branching stems and abundant yellow-centered white flowers in summer. Blossoms fade to pink and purple. Foliage is hairy and grayish green. Excellent in containers.

Eriogonum umbellatum Eriogonum umbellatum
(Sulfur flower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Wild buckwheats have assumed star roles in drought-tolerant landscapes throughout the West, and none is more useful than sulfur flower. It has wonderful evergreen foliage with brilliant blooms from late spring through late summer. Long-lived, this perennial is so adaptable that it also thrives in humid climates.

Eschscholzia californica Eschscholzia californica
(California poppy)
(1 user review)

California poppies grow to about 12 inches tall, and their pretty foliage is ferny, like carrot tops. They come in a variety of colors, from the standard golden orange, to yellow, cream, and red. Grow them in a border or rock garden.

no image available Eschscholzia californica 'Rose Chiffon'
(Rose chiffon)
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California poppies grow to about 12 inches tall, and their pretty foliage is ferny, like carrot tops. This cultivar has soft rose colored, double blooms with yellow centers.

Eucalyptus neglecta Eucalyptus neglecta
(Omeo gum, Omeo round-leaved gum)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a very hardy, strongly aromatic eucalyptus with large leaves and white flowers. It makes a good specimen.

no image available Eucomis bicolor
(Pineapple lily, Pineapple flower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species boasts maroon-speckled stems and green flowers with maroon margins. The flowers occur on thick, solitary stalks bearing bottle-brush-like wands of tightly-clung florets, which are crowned by tufts of green bracts. As the common name implies, these unusual and magnificent inflorescences are reminiscent of pineapples.

no image available Eucomis comosa
(Pineapple lily, Pineapple flower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species boasts stems and undersides of leaves with maroon spotting, and white flowers tinged with maroon. The flowers form on 24-inch-long, thick stalks bearing bottle-brush-like wands of tightly-clung florets, which are crowned by tufts of green bracts. As the common name implies, these unusual and magnificent inflorescences are reminiscent of pineapples.

Eucomis comosa 'Oakhurst' Eucomis comosa 'Oakhurst'
(Pineapple lily, Pineapple flower)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This bulbous perennial has striking reddish purple, strap-like leaves and foot-long purple flowers that resemble pineapples in late summer. Grow in a sunny border, container, or greenhouse. Plants used outdoors may be overwintered in a frost-free location. The species is native to South Africa.

Eucomis comosa 'Sparkling Burgundy' Eucomis comosa 'Sparkling Burgundy'
(Pineapple lily, Pineapple flower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This outstanding cultivar boasts dark burgundy leaves that slowly change to olive green, and then revert back dramatically as the flowers fade. The flowers form on 20- to 30-inch stalks bearing bottle-brush-like wands of tight, smokey pink florets, which are crowned by tufts of purple bracts. As the common name implies, these unusual and magnificent inflorescences are reminiscent of pineapples.

Euonymus alatus Euonymus alatus
(Burning bush, Winged spindle tree)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The familiar burning bush is a dense, flat-topped, deciduous shrub with a rounded, horizontal branching habit. Reddish purple fruit grows beneath the simple, finely toothed, dark green leaves. Foliage turns an extremely showy bright red in autumn. Smaller cultivars exist.

Euonymus atropurpureus Euonymus atropurpureus
(Eastern wahoo)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Because it is a relative of the immensely popular burning bush (E. alatus), it isn't surprising that eastern wahoo has great fall color. This North American native grows as a small tree in the southern part of its range and as a large shrub on the Plains. The bright red of its fall foliage is amplified and extended by abundant clusters of scarlet fruits that persist after the leaves have fallen, providing color even into midwinter. Eastern wahoo is effective as an accent plant or when massed wherever a bold, surprising splash of color is desired.

no image available Euonymus fortunei cvs.
(Wintercreeper)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Prostrate to mound-forming, vigorous evergreen shrubs have oval, toothed, dark green leaves. Cultivars vary in foliage color and variegation, form, climbing or creeping habit, and fall interest.

Eupatorium 'Phantom' Eupatorium 'Phantom'
('Phantom' Joe Pye weed)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Phantom' Joe Pye weed is an excellent 3-foot-tall perennial that was bred especially for smaller gardens and mixed containers. Plants have dark green, whorled foliage and handsome lavender to purple flower heads in late summer and fall. The blooms are darker when night temperatures are cool. Joe Pye weed attracts butterflies and other insects.

Eupatorium dubium 'Little Joe' Eupatorium dubium 'Little Joe'
(Joe Pye weed)
(5 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Little Joe' is a dwarf cultivar of a species of our native Joe Pye weed. It can reach 3 or 4 feet tall and 2 to 3 feet wide, and it has the familiar large domes of lavender-pink flowers that attract lots of butterflies in late summer and early fall. Its smaller size makes it a better fit in moist borders, beds, meadows, or roadside plantings.

Eupatorium maculatum Eupatorium maculatum
(Joe Pye weed)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Large, flat-topped flowerheads in shades of purple add soft color and texture to the summer and fall garden. The leaves are purple-tinged on thick stems with maroon spots. Butterflies love this eastern U.S. native.

Eupatorium maculatum 'Gateway' Eupatorium maculatum 'Gateway'
('Gateway' Joe Pye weed)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This cultivar of the eastern North American native Joe Pye weed is shorter and bushier than the species. From late summer into fall, its domes of dusky pink flowers attract butterflies and other insects. The seedheads persist well into winter. Grow 'Gateway' in a border, meadow, or cottage garden. It does best in soil that does not dry out.

Eupatorium purpureum Eupatorium purpureum
(Joe Pye weed)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Large, domed flowerheads of pink, light purple, or off-white add soft color and texture to the summer and fall garden. The leaves are purple-tinged on thick stems suffused with maroon. This eastern U.S. native attracts butterflies from mid-summer to early fall.

no image available Eupatorium rugosum
(White snakeroot)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This eastern U.S. woodland plant has clusters of small, fluffy white flowers topping stiff 3- to 5-foot-tall stems midsummer to frost. 

Eupatorium rugosum 'Chocolate' Eupatorium rugosum 'Chocolate'
(White snakeroot)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The deliciously colored maroon-brown leaves contrast nicely with neighboring plants through the season. Pure white flowerheads bloom in midsummer and stay open well into autumn.

Euphorbia 'Black Bird' Euphorbia 'Black Bird'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

With velvety foliage that darkens to near black in full sun, 'Black Bird' euphorbia looks good in perennial borders and is especially striking in containers. Flowers open above bright, lime green bracts on red stems that form a compact vase shape. -Pat McKernan, Regional Picks: Midwest, Fine Gardening issue #120

Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost' Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This hybrid produces masses of pure white bracts above finely textured, apple green foliage. It adds stunning texture and color to a border in partial shade.

no image available Euphorbia 'Helena’s Blush™'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This hybrid has petite green-and-cream variegated foliage with a hint of pink on the undersides. It produces chartreuse and apple green bicolored bracts on airy stems.

Euphorbia 'Jade Dragon' Euphorbia 'Jade Dragon'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant makes a riveting focal point in the border, with golden bracts with red centers that open just above the burgundy-tinted, dark green leaves in spring to summer.

Euphorbia amygdaloides Euphorbia amygdaloides
(Wood spurge)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Wood spurge is a soft, hairy, evergreen perennial with red-tinged stems and matte dark green leaves with red tones underneath. In mid-spring to early summer, it produces 8-inch-tall, greenish-yellow bracts.

no image available Euphorbia amygdaloides ‘Rubra’
(Wood spurge)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This cultivar has a compact, bushy habit to 20 inches tall and purple-red flushed leaves, especially on new growth and in winter. It produces yellow bracts in mid-spring and early summer.

Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae
(Mrs. Robb's bonnet)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This variety has dark, glossy evergreen leaves arranged in tight rosettes, and it produces yellow-green bracts in mid-spring and early summer.

no image available Euphorbia characias
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This upright, evergreen shrub has stunning texture and form. Its gray-green leaves and woolly, purple-tinged stems form billowy, 4-foot long branches. From early spring to early summer, it produces giant cylindrical bract clusters in yellow-green with purple-black nectar glands, and creates a specimen that looks otherworldly.

Euphorbia cotinifolia Euphorbia cotinifolia
(Tropical smoke bush, Caribbean copper plant)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

With its woody stems and oval-shaped leaves, this perennial looks a lot like a tree. Like other members of the euphorbia family, it has milky sap and tiny flowers. Most of the appeal comes from the leaf color. dark burgundy on older leaves, a brighter red on new foliage. The foliage generally dies back in winter. -Jeff Moore, Regional Picks: Southwest, Fine Gardening issue #120

no image available Euphorbia dulcis
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species produces erects stems of bronzy green leaves and greenish yellow bracts in early summer. In autumn, its leaves turn shades of red, orange, and gold.

Euphorbia dulcis 'Chameleon' Euphorbia dulcis 'Chameleon'
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This notable species produces erect stems of bronzy burgundy leaves and purple-green bracts in early summer. It looks exceptional when placed near contrasting plants. The foliage may be cut back after flowering to produce fresh growth.

Euphorbia griffithii Euphorbia griffithii
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species has red stems and dark green leaves, which emerge in spring with a reddish tinge. In early summer, it bears conspicuous bracts of orange-red or red. 

Euphorbia griffithii 'Fireglow' Euphorbia griffithii 'Fireglow'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Fireglow' bears conspicuous bracts in vivid orange-fuchsia in early summer. It has red stems and dark green leaves, which emerge in spring with a reddish tinge.  

no image available Euphorbia myrsinites
(Myrtle spurge)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Long-lasting, terminal clusters of lime green bracts and flowers punctuate the meandering 'arms' of this ground-hugging species. The chalky seafoam foliage looks great spilling over a stone wall in a rock garden or at the edge of any bed.

Euphorbia palustris Euphorbia palustris
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This robust perennial forms a large shrub that adds a nice textural element to the back of the border. In early spring it produces 6-inch-wide, vivid yellow bracts.

Euphorbia polychroma Euphorbia polychroma
(Cushion spurge)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Electric yellow bracts bloom on a low cushion in April and persist, but gently fade as the stems elongate to form a 16-inch mound by midsummer. The leaves produce shades of red, orange, and purple in autumn.

no image available Euphorbia rigida
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species is similar to E. myrsinites, but its habit is first erect before spreading, and its steely blue leaves are more narrow and pointed. It also bears terminal yellow bracts from early spring to summer.

no image available Euphorbia tirucalli
(Pencil tree, Finger tree)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This unusual looking plant has many succulent, pencil-like branches. The leaves are small and short-lived, and the flowers are insignificant. Euphorbia tirucalli can grow to almost 30 feet in the wild, but it can be used as a smaller specimen or container plant in the garden. It is hardy only in Zone 11.

Evolvus Blue My Mind™ Evolvus Blue My Mind™
(Blue My Mind™ evolvus)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Blue is hard to get one's hands on in the garden, but Blue My Mind™ evolvus fills the void! This heat-tolerant beauty makes a stunning addition to containers beds alike, and it's so polite that it doesn't even need deadheading.

Fagus sylvatica 'Purple Fountain' Fagus sylvatica 'Purple Fountain'
(Purple fountain beech, European beech)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Purple Fountain' is a deciduous, columnar, dark-leaved tree with bronze-purple, wavy margined leaves and cascading branches. Leaves become more green as summer wears on. It can be used as a specimen tree or for pleaching. It is similar to the purple weeping beech but is much more columnar. Fall color is yellow, then orange-brown.

Fallugia paradoxa Fallugia paradoxa
(Apache plume)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A member of the rose family (Rosaceae), Apache plume has single, white, rose-like flowers in a fine-textured shrub up to 5 feet tall and 8 feet wide. Flowering occurs from late spring until late summer, and is followed by clouds of showy, pink, feater-duster-like seed heads that are just as showy as the flowers.

Farfugium japonicum 'Aureomaculatum' Farfugium japonicum 'Aureomaculatum'
(Farfugium)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Green-and-yellow mottled, shiny, kidney-shaped leaves distinguish this evergreen perennial native to streamsides and seashores in East Asia. The large, leathery leaves can reach a foot across. The yellow flowers bloom in fall and winter, but they are small and secondary to the foliage. Farfugium are nice at waterside, as a groundcover, in a border, or in containers.

no image available Farfugium japonicum 'Crispatum'
(Farfugium)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This evergreen foliage plant has large, leathery leaves and daisy-like yellow flowers. It looks great in the border or in containers. 

Fargesia nitida Fargesia nitida
(Fountain bamboo)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This striking clump-forming bamboo, with olive-purple stems, dark green leaves, and an upright habit, is suitable for screening. May be grown in a container if provided with adequate moisture.

Fatsia japonica Fatsia japonica
(Paperplant)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Japanese fatsia has very large, hand-shaped glossy leaves that glow in the shade. New leaves fan out on stiff stems all along the ringed trunks. The flower clusters of older fatsias attract bees. -Nellie Neal, Regional Picks: Southeast, Fine Gardening issue #127

Festuca glauca 'Boulder Blue' Festuca glauca 'Boulder Blue'
(Blue fescue, Gray fescue)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Regarded by some as the bluest blue fescue, this plant forms compact, cascading mounds of foot-tall, intensely blue, narrow leaves that are attractive in all seasons. Blooms are generally secondary to the foliage, but this cultivar blooms more heavily than most, with spikelets in summer. This cultivar is long-lived and very hardy. Grow in groups in a border or rock garden, or as a groundcover. 

Festuca glauca 'Elijah Blue' Festuca glauca 'Elijah Blue'
(Blue fescue, Gray fescue)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

These compact tufts of 8-inch-long powder-blue leaves are well suited for edging and naturalizing in the rock garden. 

Festuca mairei Festuca mairei
(Atlas fescue)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This sturdy groundcover is fast becoming one of the most dependable grasses for creating drought-tolerant meadows. Clumping evergreen foliage is a rich khaki green and grows in an arching clump. The flowers, while noticeable, are not showy. Atlas fescue is at its best in groups and grows in all but hot, humid, and low desert climates.

no image available Ficus lyrata
(Fiddle-leaf fig)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Large, paddle-shaped leaves with prominent veins make this tree a standout in containers outdoors or as a houseplant. Native to topical regions of western and central Africa, fiddle-leaf fig has leathery, glossy, evergreen leaves and round fruit. In the wild, it can reach 100 feet tall and almost as wide, but its size is easily controlled in containers. It was a popular houseplant in the 1950s and 60s.

Forsythia ‘Courtasol’ Forsythia ‘Courtasol’
(Forsythia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Like other cultivars of this genus, 'Courtasol' is as tough as nails. The biggest difference from the rest, however, lies in its form. The stems reach to only 18 inches tall before arching down to the ground and running along to yield a 5-foot-wide spread. Its grapefruit yellow flowers appear in early spring.

no image available Forsythia × intermedia 'Kolgold'
(Forsythia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Striking, extra-large yellow blooms cover each stem from base to tip in early spring.