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Browse Plants

Narrowed By:Characteristics: Self Seeds+ Tolerance: Deer Tolerant
Displaying 1 - 43 of 43 listings   1 | 2 | 3View All Sort By: Sort
Digitalis grandiflora Digitalis grandiflora
(Yellow foxglove)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Originating in mountainous woodland and stony habitats from Europe to western Asia, yellow foxglove is tolerant of dry shade but flourishes with moisture. Arising in midsummer from neat clumps of fine-toothed foliage, a mass of soft yellow open bells, speckled brown inside, blooms along one side of a 3-foot-tall stem. Usually described as a perennial, it is more accurate to call it a biennial or short-lived perennial. If the flowering stalk is cut down after blooms have faded, it may rebloom in the fall. When a few flower stalks are left, the plant self-seeds. 

no image available Echinacea angustifolia
(Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This native meadow perennial has daisy-like blossoms in early summer. It bears copper-orange central cones surrounded by short, arching, ray petals in pink or purple-pink, and occasionally white.

no image available Euphorbia dulcis
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species produces erects stems of bronzy green leaves and greenish yellow bracts in early summer. In autumn, its leaves turn shades of red, orange, and gold.

Euphorbia dulcis 'Chameleon' Euphorbia dulcis 'Chameleon'
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This notable species produces erect stems of bronzy burgundy leaves and purple-green bracts in early summer. It looks exceptional when placed near contrasting plants. The foliage may be cut back after flowering to produce fresh growth.

no image available Euphorbia myrsinites
(Myrtle spurge)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Long-lasting, terminal clusters of lime green bracts and flowers punctuate the meandering 'arms' of this ground-hugging species. The chalky seafoam foliage looks great spilling over a stone wall in a rock garden or at the edge of any bed.

Euphorbia polychroma Euphorbia polychroma
(Cushion spurge)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Electric yellow bracts bloom on a low cushion in April and persist, but gently fade as the stems elongate to form a 16-inch mound by midsummer. The leaves produce shades of red, orange, and purple in autumn.

no image available Euphorbia rigida
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species is similar to E. myrsinites, but its habit is first erect before spreading, and its steely blue leaves are more narrow and pointed. It also bears terminal yellow bracts from early spring to summer.

Linum lewisii Linum lewisii
(Blue flax)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Blue flax is a short-lived perennial with blue-green needlelike leaves on graceful 2-foot-tall stems. Satiny sky blue flowers, borne on wiry stems, appear in late spring, last through mid-summer, and open fully only on sunny days. Small rounded seedheads form in summer. 

Muhlenbergia capillaris Muhlenbergia capillaris
(Muhly grass)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In autumn, this unique specimen creates a spectacular, billowy inflorescence of massed, vibrant pink, airy flowers on 4-foot stems. It is noted for its tolerance to poorly drained soil. It is possibly hardy to Zone 6 with protection.

Muhlenbergia lindheimeri Muhlenbergia lindheimeri
(Lindheimer's muhly)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This beautiful warm-season grass produces attractive, pale purplish-gray plumes in autumn and goes dormant in the cold season. It forms a neat, upright clump with fine blue-gray foliage.

Narcissus jonquilla Narcissus jonquilla
(Wild jonquil, Daffodil)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This Division 10 Bulbocodium species blooms late in the season, bearing up to 5 fragrant and nodding golden-yellow flowers. It has cylindrical, dark-green stems to 12 inches. It is good for naturalizing, and prefers neutral to alkaline soil.

Pennisetum alopecuroides Pennisetum alopecuroides
(Fountain grass)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species produces 2- to 5-foot-tall mounds of narrow green foliage and bottle brush-like silvery-pink to purple flowers, both of which mature to shades of brown. It is the parent of numerous cultivars with notable flowers that range from purple to gray/black. It and some of its cultivars self-sow plentifully in warm climates. It is marginally hardy in Zone 5.

Pennisetum glaucum 'Purple Majesty' Pennisetum glaucum 'Purple Majesty'
(Pearl millet)
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This cultivar of pearl millet has wide, deep purple foliage and stems. It forms a 5-foot-high specimen with tight cylindrical flowers of purple-brown seeds—a favorite of many birds. This plant makes a stunning container specimen. In the mixed border, its foliage contrasts nicely with other plants.

Pennisetum messiacum Pennisetum messiacum
(Bunny tails)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This annual grass produces deep pink flowers that resemble rabbits' tails. Flowers persist throughout the season. It forms a tidy, evergreen clump, 2 feet high and 3 feet wide.

no image available Pennisetum messiacum 'Red Buttons'
(Red bunny tails, Fountain grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This annual produces deep reddish-black flowers that resemble rabbits' tails. Flowers persist throughout the season. This plant forms an evergreen clump of green foliage with burgundy highlights, 2 feet high and 3 feet wide.

no image available Ribes odoratum
(Buffalo currant, Clove currant, Golden currant)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In spring, this North American native shrub produces clove-scented, lemon-yellow flowers, which are followed by black edible fruits. It has attractive leaves, and grows 6 feet high and wide.

no image available Ribes sanguineum 'White Icicle'
(Red flowering currant, Winter currant)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is considered one of the best white flowering currants, bearing long-lasting, pendent racemes of pungently spicy, pure-white blooms. Its yellow autumn leaves fall to expose mahogany stems in winter, which later make a striking contrast to chartreuse flower buds in spring. It grows to about 10 feet high and wide.

no image available Saccharum arundinaceum
(Plume grass, Hardy sugar cane)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In late summer, this large, clump-forming species bears huge plumes of delicate pink flower clusters, which eventually fade to silver.

Saccharum ravennae Saccharum ravennae
(Ravenna grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This large, clump-forming grass has linear leaves with central white stripes. In late summer it bears huge, purplish-bronze flower clusters, which eventually fade to silver. It resents high fertility and shows considerable drought tolerance.

Salvia coccinea Salvia coccinea
(Texas sage, Hummingbird sage)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This upright tender perennial provides rich color for annual bedding schemes where it is not hardy. Its deep red flowers are borne on 2- to 2.5- foot, open spikes from summer to autumn. Plants grow to about a foot wide and bear hairy, oval to heart-shaped leaves. Salvias are some of the showiest plants for containers, annual borders, and mixed borders. Butterflies and hummingbirds love them.

Schizachyrium scoparium Schizachyrium scoparium
(Little bluestem, Prairie beard grass)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Little bluestem is a tidy, finely textured clumping grass with a blue-green summer color. Its silvery seed heads rise to a height of nearly 2 feet in late summer and are at their best when backlit in the morning or afternoon sun. In fall, the grass turns a rosy rust color that lasts all winter.

Sesleria autumnalis Sesleria autumnalis
(Autumn moor grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This cool-season grass begins the season with bright green blades. In late summer and early fall, it produces silvery inflorescences which complement its golden-hued autumn foliage and persist throughout the winter.

no image available Solidago caesia
(Goldenrod, Wreath goldenrod, Blue-stemmed goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In early autumn, this species produces elegant, wand-shaped flowerheads atop wiry stems with blue-green, linear leaves. It is found in open woods and along woodland edges, and prefers some shade. It responds well to rich soil, but can tolerate dry soil also. 

Solidago flexicaulis Solidago flexicaulis
(Goldenrod, Zigzag goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species is aptly named for its distinctive crooked stems that bend back and forth at 45° angles between nodes. It bears starry, medium-yellow flowers atop 1- to 3-foot tall stems. 

Solidago juncea Solidago juncea
(Goldenrod, Early goldenrod, Yellow top)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is the first goldenrod to bloom, featuring bright yellow, plume-like panicles in midsummer. It has dark green leaves along reddish stems, which form a vase-shaped clump when mature. 

Solidago nemoralis Solidago nemoralis
(Goldenrod, Gray goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the smallest species of goldenrod, topping out at only 4 to 6 inches high in poor soils, and 2 feet high in fertile soils. It is considered a garden-worthy species, with gray-green leaves that form clumps and languid, one-sided yellow plumes. It is tolerant of both sandy and clay soils.

Solidago rigida Solidago rigida
(Goldenrod, Stiff goldenrod)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This lovely goldenrod has velvety leaves that are gray-green in summer and dusky rose in autumn. It has broad, flattened clusters of rich yellow flowers, which create a striking display on stems 2 to 5 feet tall.

no image available Solidago rugosa
(Goldenrod, Rough-stemmed goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species has open, tree-shaped flower clusters that radiate out like a fountain. It has given rise to S. rugosa 'Fireworks'.  It can grow to 7 feet tall and blooms in mid- to late autumn.  

no image available Solidago speciosa
(Goldenrod, Showy goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This garden-worthy species has dramatic, bright yellow flowers that are arranged into erect, pointed clusters. It has deep reddish stems that grow to 3 feet tall. It blooms in late summer and early autumn.

Solidago sphacelata 'Golden Fleece' Solidago sphacelata 'Golden Fleece'
(Goldenrod, Creeping goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This outstanding cultivar forms a neat, 1-foot tall groundcover. It has dense, branched panicles that splay upward and outward whimsically, resembling a mass of elegantly bunched bouquets. 

Sporobolus heterolepsis Sporobolus heterolepsis
(Prairie dropseed)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The finely textured, green leaves of this slow-growing, clump-forming perennial turn golden yellow in autumn. It bears cloudy panicles of fragrant, pale-pink to tawny flowers 5 to 10 inches long in late summer, reaching 3 feet tall.

no image available Stipa arundinacea
(New Zealand wind grass, Pheasant's tail grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This evergreen species makes a handsome specimen with narrow, arching foliage that is streaked orange in summer and becomes orange-brown in winter. Its fine, pendent flower inflorescences open purplish-green in midsummer and have a misty quality.

Stipa gigantea Stipa gigantea
(Giant feather grass, Golden oats)
(1 user review)

This semi-evergreen species makes a stately, stand-alone specimen with narrow, arching foliage and shimmering gold panicles that reach 8 feet tall. The flowers open in June as silvery-purple and mature to shades of wheat.

Stipa tenuissima Stipa tenuissima
(Mexican feather grass)
(5 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

No other grass exhibits quite the refinement of texture as this species. Its bright green foliage resembles delicate filaments that arise in elegant, vase-like clumps and spill outward like a soft fountain. All summer it bears a profusion of feathery panicles, which mature from foamy-green to blonde. It is native to the Americas.

Verbascum bombyciferum Verbascum bombyciferum
(Mullein, Nettle-leafed mullein, Turkish mullein)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This biennial or short-lived perennial has evergreen woolly leaves like silvery flannel that make sensuous-looking rosettes in the first year. In mid- to late summer of its second year, large sulfur-yellow blossoms open from the bottom up on flower stalks that reach up to 6 feet high. Blooming continues for many weeks. Verbascum bombyciferum has naturalized in regions of the U.S.

Verbascum chaixii Verbascum chaixii
(Chaix mullein, Nettle-leaved mullein, Mullein)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the few truly perennial species of mullein. Pale yellow blossoms with purple filaments bloom profusely on long flower stalks in mid- and late summer, reaching about 3 feet high. Individual flowers are short-lived but numerous, and flowering takes place over a long time. Verbascum chaixii's glossy, dark green rosettes are semi-evergreen. 

no image available Verbascum densiflorum
(Dense-flowered mullein, Large-flowered mullein)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This biennial or short-lived, semi-evergreen perennial forms rosettes of leaves densely covered with grayish-yellow hairs. In summer, its bright-yellow or occasionally white blossoms flower along erect, branching stalks up to 5 feet high. It has naturalized in regions of the U.S.

Verbascum phoeniceum Verbascum phoeniceum
(Purple mullein, Mullein)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This biennial or short-lived perennial species is one of the earliest mulleins to bloom. Its showy blossoms of dark-purple, violet, pink, or white open along slender 3-foot spires for about two weeks in early summer. Its shiny dark green leaves are ground-hugging and evergreen. It has naturalized in some regions of the U.S.

Yucca filamentosa ‘Golden Sword’ Yucca filamentosa ‘Golden Sword’
(Adam's needle, Bear grass, Weak-leaf yucca, Golden Sword soapwort)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This easy to grow evergreen yucca bears dramatic, sword-shaped yellow leaves with a dark green edge. Not as staunchly upright as some yuccas, its leaf tips sometimes droop with age. Its foliage color is best from fall to spring. Plants grow to nearly 2 feet in height and 3 feet in width. In summer, it produces a 6-foot-tall spike covered with nodding, fragrant, white bell-shaped flowers.

Yucca glauca Yucca glauca
(Soapweed)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This clumping evergreen shrub with narrow leaves produces a startling, 3- to 4-foot-tall flower stalk. The fragrant flowers are pale green or greenish white. It is a tenacious weed in areas of the American West, but adds a touch of the desert to gardens. Soap can be made from its roots and the foliage is used in basket-making.

no image available Zauschneria arizonica
(Hardy hummingbird trumpet, Arizona fuchsia, Firechalice, Wild fuchsia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This heat-loving native Southwestern species has gray-green leaves and grows to 3 feet tall and 2 feet wide. Orangey red, tubular blossoms cover the plant in late summer and early fall.

Zephyranthes reginae Zephyranthes reginae
(Rain lily, Rainflower, Valles yellow rain lily, Zephyr lily)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

These Mexican native bulbs actually offer demanding gardeners flowers on demand. They produce strappy foliage to 12 inches tall and clusters of buttery-yellow, starry, crocus-like blossoms two to three days after every rain in summer and early autumn. Or, if it doesn't rain, simply water and fertilize three days prior to your intended display, and the moisture will prompt the flowers to appear, hence the common name, rainflower. These bulbs are widely adaptable to diverse soil conditions, and may be grown in full sun to partial shade, but they prefer some shade.

Zinnia grandiflora Zinnia grandiflora
(Prairie zinnia)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This native perennial wildflower of the American Southwest bears a profusion of bright yellow to golden yellow flowers atop 4-inch high plants that spread to 15 inches wide. They bloom from late summer into fall. 


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